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View Full Version : which rear sight would you go with?


GoingPro
12-16-2008, 12:52 AM
i have no sights on my AR right now...and i need to get one until i get my aimpoint . which one do you guys think would be best?

Artery
12-16-2008, 1:01 AM
I have an ARMS 40L on mine, works fine, folds down nice and low

aplinker
12-16-2008, 1:10 AM
Fixed: LMT or LaRue

Folding: Troy

GoingPro
12-16-2008, 1:20 AM
Fixed: LMT or LaRue

Folding: Troy

alright i ordered my troy just now..thanks

Ballistic043
12-16-2008, 4:45 AM
lmao


good base for a decision. the troy is definitely worth the money... if you plan on standing on your front sight

GoingPro
12-16-2008, 2:16 PM
the troy BUIS will work with the stock front iron sight right?

Mark One
12-16-2008, 2:39 PM
Damn Double Posting...

Mark One
12-16-2008, 2:40 PM
the troy BUIS will work with the stock front iron sight right?

If by stock you are referring to the A-Frame then yes.

aplinker
12-17-2008, 7:18 AM
the troy BUIS will work with the stock front iron sight right?

yes

Mac Attack
12-17-2008, 7:42 AM
I like the GG+G MADD rear foldup buis. Simple and reliable. I have had one on mine for years and it always hold zero.

maxicon
12-17-2008, 10:13 AM
Here's my standard post on choosing a BUIS. It's hard to go wrong with the Troy, though, as they're low enough for most optics to fit over.


Are you going to mount a magnified optic? If so, you need to consider whether the BUIS will fit under the scope and mount combo - some mounts (like the Armalite) are very low, and others (like the M1Sales) are quite high.

If it's for a red dot/Eotech style, there's a lot more flexibility.

For a magnified scope, you'll need a flip-up BUIS. For a non magnified optic, you can use a fixed sight as well, which is generally sturdier, but obscures part of your field of view.

A few things to consider when choosing rear flip-up BUIS, depending on if it's going to be a range gun or a SHTF gun:

- Will it be used for precision or long-range shooting? A small aperture is helpful for this. If the use is both close-up and long-range, a dual-aperture sight is useful.
- If it's multi-aperture, which one is deployed when it flips? Some flip with the large aperture deployed, others with the small. If you're not in a hurry, this won't matter, but some people care.
- If multi-aperture, do the apertures deploy in the same plane? Some deploy with an elevation shift to account for the range differences, others use the same zero for both apertures.
- Do you want the windage knob easy to adjust or shielded to prevent accidental adjustments? ARMS are exposed and easy, Troy is shielded.
- Does it have elevation adjustments? Some do (like the Wilson Combat), most don't.
- How easy is it to deploy or adjust if your hands are muddy or gloved?
- Does it latch in the up position, the down position, or both?
- How protected is it from damage, both down and deployed? The Matech is one that sticks up with little protection and can easily be tweaked or broken by rough handling when deployed.
- How robust is the detent mechanism? The Matech will wear over time and become easier to deploy (and eventually won't lock). For many, this doesn't matter, as their BUIS aren't used often.
- How many slots does it cover? This is important if you need to conserve rail space.

Figure out which of these are important to you and what capabilities you want, and it will narrow down the choices quite a lot.


Here's how to figure out if it will fit under your scope and mount.

- Measure the scope's eyepiece diameter, with flip caps if you're going to use them. Butler Creek usually adds about 0.1" to the diameter.
- Divide that by 2.
- Subtract that from the centerline height of your mount or rings.
This gives the maximum height BUIS that will fit under that scope/mount combo.

For example, my Leupold VX1 4-12x40 eyepiece diameter is 1.7" with flip caps - divided by 2 gives 0.85". Mounting it in a 1" LaRue LT-104, which has a 1.41" centerline, would leave (1.41-0.85) = 0.56 as the tallest BUIS that would fit. As you can see from the list below, that leaves out many. This is one reason the Troy BUIS is so popular.

Here are some popular BUIS heights:

ARMS 40 - 0.950" folded (mine is 1.00" even)
YHM-9680 - 0.840" folded (mine is 0.850")
Matech - 0.75" folded
MI ERS - 0.750" folded
GG&G MAD - 0.625" folded
ARMS 40L - 0.610" folded
Troy - 0.460" folded
MI MCTAR-SPLP - .4375" folded
KAC 300m - 0.315" folded

GoingPro
12-17-2008, 12:40 PM
Here's my standard post on choosing a BUIS. It's hard to go wrong with the Troy, though, as they're low enough for most optics to fit over.


Are you going to mount a magnified optic? If so, you need to consider whether the BUIS will fit under the scope and mount combo - some mounts (like the Armalite) are very low, and others (like the M1Sales) are quite high.

If it's for a red dot/Eotech style, there's a lot more flexibility.

For a magnified scope, you'll need a flip-up BUIS. For a non magnified optic, you can use a fixed sight as well, which is generally sturdier, but obscures part of your field of view.

A few things to consider when choosing rear flip-up BUIS, depending on if it's going to be a range gun or a SHTF gun:

- Will it be used for precision or long-range shooting? A small aperture is helpful for this. If the use is both close-up and long-range, a dual-aperture sight is useful.
- If it's multi-aperture, which one is deployed when it flips? Some flip with the large aperture deployed, others with the small. If you're not in a hurry, this won't matter, but some people care.
- If multi-aperture, do the apertures deploy in the same plane? Some deploy with an elevation shift to account for the range differences, others use the same zero for both apertures.
- Do you want the windage knob easy to adjust or shielded to prevent accidental adjustments? ARMS are exposed and easy, Troy is shielded.
- Does it have elevation adjustments? Some do (like the Wilson Combat), most don't.
- How easy is it to deploy or adjust if your hands are muddy or gloved?
- Does it latch in the up position, the down position, or both?
- How protected is it from damage, both down and deployed? The Matech is one that sticks up with little protection and can easily be tweaked or broken by rough handling when deployed.
- How robust is the detent mechanism? The Matech will wear over time and become easier to deploy (and eventually won't lock). For many, this doesn't matter, as their BUIS aren't used often.
- How many slots does it cover? This is important if you need to conserve rail space.

Figure out which of these are important to you and what capabilities you want, and it will narrow down the choices quite a lot.


Here's how to figure out if it will fit under your scope and mount.

- Measure the scope's eyepiece diameter, with flip caps if you're going to use them. Butler Creek usually adds about 0.1" to the diameter.
- Divide that by 2.
- Subtract that from the centerline height of your mount or rings.
This gives the maximum height BUIS that will fit under that scope/mount combo.

For example, my Leupold VX1 4-12x40 eyepiece diameter is 1.7" with flip caps - divided by 2 gives 0.85". Mounting it in a 1" LaRue LT-104, which has a 1.41" centerline, would leave (1.41-0.85) = 0.56 as the tallest BUIS that would fit. As you can see from the list below, that leaves out many. This is one reason the Troy BUIS is so popular.

Here are some popular BUIS heights:

ARMS 40 - 0.950" folded (mine is 1.00" even)
YHM-9680 - 0.840" folded (mine is 0.850")
Matech - 0.75" folded
MI ERS - 0.750" folded
GG&G MAD - 0.625" folded
ARMS 40L - 0.610" folded
Troy - 0.460" folded
MI MCTAR-SPLP - .4375" folded
KAC 300m - 0.315" folded


sweet thank you for the info