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AvyDriver
12-14-2008, 5:52 PM
Hey all,

I have been wanting an M14 for sometime now and whenever I start to do some research on the net about them i always run across them being titled as M1A/M14. What is the difference between the M1A and M14? I know a semi auto m14 is getting harder and harder to come by and if the M1A and M14 are basically the same gun that would make my life alot easier. Thanks for the input.

Darklyte27
12-14-2008, 5:53 PM
M1A is the Civilian version of the M14.
some more knowledgeable people can chime in what the difference is.

I am looking for a M1A MA9826CA.

SoundFX
12-14-2008, 6:00 PM
The M1A is a trademark of Springfield Armory Inc. (the modern company, not the original Springfield Armory that used to make USGI parts). Some companies, like LRB, make the "M14SA", and things like that. But M1A's are only made by Springfield.

Also, the main difference between a real M14 and their civilian counterparts is the select fire capability. Obviously, the civilian versions lack the ability to fire fully-automatic.

Bimmer2
12-14-2008, 7:01 PM
SoundFX is right: M1A is just the Springfield Armory Inc. version of the M14.
"M1A" has become the generic term for "semi-auto M14," just like "AR-15" (Colt trademark) is the generic term for semi-auto M16.

SoundFX is wrong: The difference is much more than just select-fire capability.
Though real USGI M14 receivers are basically N/A, there's a GREAT premium placed on original USGI parts for their quality, rather than later (generally inferior) commercially-made parts.
In same cases this is merely cosmetic, but in other cases (exploding Chi-Com bolts), it's really a safety issue.

Check out "The Firing Line" if you're really serious about getting one.

SoundFX
12-14-2008, 7:51 PM
SoundFX is right: M1A is just the Springfield Armory Inc. version of the M14.
"M1A" has become the generic term for "semi-auto M14," just like "AR-15" (Colt trademark) is the generic term for semi-auto M16.

SoundFX is wrong: The difference is much more than just select-fire capability.
Though real USGI M14 receivers are basically N/A, there's a GREAT premium placed on original USGI parts for their quality, rather than later (generally inferior) commercially-made parts.
In same cases this is merely cosmetic, but in other cases (exploding Chi-Com bolts), it's really a safety issue.

Check out "The Firing Line" if you're really serious about getting one.

Whelp, I was trying to give a general answer so as not to be overly verbose. Also, there are a lot of non-USGI parts that are of excellent quality. For example, the many parts on my two Smith Enterprise Crazy Horse rifles out in the safe (gas cylinder, plug, piston, gas lock, and bolt release are all built by SEI), LRB's gas cylinders or muzzle brakes, or the new Korean forged one-piece op-rods. SEI's op-rods should be available pretty soon as well. The Chinese bolts aren't the same as USGI bolts, it's true, but you can have a Chinese rifle modified to accept a proper USGI bolt.

And if you notice, I said "the main difference".

:)

Pugster
12-14-2008, 8:23 PM
Real M14 have a forged receiver while the M1A has a cast

SoundFX
12-14-2008, 9:04 PM
LRB's are forged, and some Smith Enterprise receivers were forged as well.

AvyDriver
12-14-2008, 9:16 PM
Ok so other then quality of parts (being USGI on true M14s) and M1A being a trademarked name of Springfield Armory, if you broke the two weapons down into parts would all the parts be the same (other then quality of manufacture)?

I have a feeling this is going to turn into me buying bits and pieces from vendors to end up building exactly what I want and I am trying to decide between building from complete scratch of buying an M1A as a beginning platform and upgrading as I go.

SoundFX
12-14-2008, 10:14 PM
Ok so other then quality of parts (being USGI on true M14s) and M1A being a trademarked name of Springfield Armory, if you broke the two weapons down into parts would all the parts be the same (other then quality of manufacture)?

If you mean, "Will my USGI trigger group fit my Springfield Armory Inc. M1A?", then the answer is yes. Many of the parts are interchangeable. They are just manufactured to different specs and often have different metallurgy. For instance, most Springfield Armory Inc. op-rods are cast, but the USGI versions are forged, etc.


I have a feeling this is going to turn into me buying bits and pieces from vendors to end up building exactly what I want and I am trying to decide between building from complete scratch of buying an M1A as a beginning platform and upgrading as I go.

Yep, your feeling is imho correct. You could have LRB, Fulton Armory, or others build you a rifle from start to finish (some companies will use USGI parts, though some are often well-worn). BUT, if you REALLY want to get what you want, I'd start scouring the net for the parts. That's what I did.

Lots of folks like TRW parts best, because they were manufactured with the best technology available at the time (they made aircraft parts). Gotta say, everything that I have that says TRW on it has been really special. But, I have Winchester, HRA, Springfield Armory (the original company) and other parts too.

PM me if you want my opinion on how to build the best rifle. It won't be cheap, though.

Sfx

WINGEDSWORD
12-14-2008, 10:22 PM
The more correct answer on the select fire part of the question is that the M-14 could be set for select fire, but that had to be done by the unit armorer.
As issued, only the automatic rifleman in each fire team had select fire capability. The rest were strictly semi-automatic.

SoundFX
12-14-2008, 10:37 PM
The more correct answer on the select fire part of the question is that the M-14 could be set for select fire, but that had to be done by the unit armorer.
As issued, only the automatic rifleman in each fire team had select fire capability. The rest were strictly semi-automatic.

It's kind of splitting hairs, because it's easy enough to modify the rifle to either configuration. My point was that M14 receivers had the proper cuts to allow for the select fire parts. Hence, "select fire capability". Civilian versions do not share the same receiver geometry, and cannot be lawfully (or easily!) modified to accept the full-auto parts.

I was not aware that most Soldiers were not issued rifles that were select-fire ready, but it certainly makes sense on a logistical level.

victor1echo
12-18-2008, 4:03 PM
I was looking on Gunbroker, and there was a springfield for about 1,550. In the picture, of the box, there was a sticker that said Not Legel in California if purchased after 1999. What was that all about--the rifle looked NIB?

MILLITIAof1
12-18-2008, 4:06 PM
I was looking on Gunbroker, and there was a springfield for about 1,550. In the picture, of the box, there was a sticker that said Not Legel in California if purchased after 1999. What was that all about--the rifle looked NIB?

probably flash hider/over 10rnd mags

Bimmer2
12-18-2008, 4:09 PM
probably flash hider/over 10rnd mags

+1 A flash hider or a 20-round mag mean it's a no-no.

You could probably get the seller to take off the flash hider and keep the magazine...

Bimmer2
12-18-2008, 4:12 PM
Whelp, I was trying to give a general answer so as not to be overly verbose...
And if you notice, I said "the main difference".


No offense intended, SoundFX. I just didn't want him to think that "parts are parts."

SoundFX
12-18-2008, 5:31 PM
No offense intended, SoundFX. I just didn't want him to think that "parts are parts."

Hey, no prob Bimmer2. I think I was feeling kinda defensive that night. Lots of work lately, with the accompanying stress. Sorry if the tone of my reply was kinda off.

victor1echo
12-19-2008, 4:33 PM
Thanks friends.