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View Full Version : Dec. 7, 1941 67 years ago Let's all take a moment to remember


Fire in the Hole
12-07-2008, 10:49 AM
Please let's all stop for a moment today to consider and reflect upon the sacrifices that those young Sailors and Marines made for us on this day in 1941 67 years ago. I give you these: I can't listen to them without getting all choked up.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bnm-4kSLKdI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oB25pp9HaDc

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Iu8y2pvuRg


"Eternal Father, Strong to Save": The Navy Hymn

The song known to United States Navy men and women as the "Navy Hymn," is a musical benediction that long has had a special appeal to seafaring men, particularly in the American Navy and the Royal Navies of the British Commonwealth and which, in more recent years, has become a part of French naval tradition.

The original words were written as a hymn by a schoolmaster and clergyman of the Church of England, the Rev. William Whiting. Rev. Whiting (1825-1878) resided on the English coast near the sea and had once survived a furious storm in the Mediterranean. His experiences inspired him to pen the ode, "Eternal Father, Strong to Save." In the following year, 1861, the words were adapted to music by another English clergyman, the Rev. John B. Dykes (1823-1876) , who had originally written the music as "Melita" (ancient name for the Mediterranean island of Malta). Rev. Dykes' name may be recognized as that of the composer given credit for the music to many other well-known hymns, including "Holy, Holy, Holy," "Lead, Kindly Light," "Jesus, Lover of My Soul," and "Nearer, My God to Thee."

In the United States, in 1879 the late Rear Adm. Charles Jackson Train, an 1865 graduate of the United States Naval Academy at Annapolis was a lieutenant commander stationed at the Academy in charge of the Midshipman Choir. In that year, Lt. Comdr. Train inaugurated the present practice of concluding each Sunday's Divine Services at the Academy with the singing of the first verse of this hymn.

The hymn, entitled "Eternal Father, Strong to Save," is found in most Protestant Hymnals. It can be more easily located in these hymnals by consulting the "Index to First Lines" under "Eternal Father, Strong to Save." The words have been changed several times since the original hymn by Rev. Whiting was first published in 1860-61. One will find that the verses as now published differ from the original primarily in the choice of one or two words in several lines of each verse. However, inasmuch as it is not known whether the original words are now available in a hymnal, those original words are given below:
Eternal Father, Strong to save,
Whose arm hath bound the restless wave,
Who bid'st the mighty Ocean deep
Its own appointed limits keep;
O hear us when we cry to thee,
for those in peril on the sea.
O Christ! Whose voice the waters heard
And hushed their raging at Thy word,
Who walked'st on the foaming deep,
and calm amidst its rage didst sleep;
Oh hear us when we cry to Thee
For those in peril on the sea!
Most Holy spirit! Who didst brood
Upon the chaos dark and rude,
And bid its angry tumult cease,
And give, for wild confusion, peace;
Oh, hear us when we cry to Thee
For those in peril on the sea!
O Trinity of love and power!
Our brethren shield in danger's hour;
From rock and tempest, fire and foe,
Protect them wheresoe'er they go;
Thus evermore shall rise to Thee,
Glad hymns of praise from land and sea.

It will be noted that in the Hymnal (1940) of the Protestant Episcopal Church, the second and third verses of the hymn are different from those second and third verses published elsewhere. These substitutions give recognition to changing aspects of our culture, particularly the advent of additional modes of transportation -- the automobile and the airplane. The Episcopal second and third verses are:
O Christ, the Lord of hill and plain
O'er which our traffic runs amain,
by mountain pass or valley low,
Wherever Lord thy brethren go;
Protect them by Thy guardian hand
From every peril on the land.
O Spirit, Whom the Father send
To spread abroad the Firmament;
O wind of heaven, by Thy Might,
Save all who dare the eagle's flight;
And keep them by Thy watchful care
From every peril in the air.

__________________

chuck762
12-07-2008, 12:12 PM
RIP all our service members who died on Dec 7th and the rest of the war.
Sadly today, most people it seems want to forget this day and the sacrifices that were made.

chris
12-07-2008, 12:36 PM
it is hard to believe that is has been 67 years since that fatefull day. too bad most people today have no idea what happened today so many years ago.

97F1504RAD
12-07-2008, 12:58 PM
Isnt that the truth. They barely teach about it in school any more and the sad part of all is that it is making people forget. I myself will never forget as my grandfather was a Pearl Harbor Survivor.

God Bless them and all.

Fire in the Hole
12-07-2008, 5:01 PM
I had a Japaneese Foreign Exchange student in one of my classes in HS. She said that nothing much is taught in Japaneese schools about WWII, Nagasaki, Hiroshima, and especially Pearl Harbor. When I was stationed in Germany, I made some German friends. They said that Adolph Hitler's name was never brought up. Nor was Auschwitz or Bukenvald.

jpkotor
12-09-2008, 12:23 PM
I had a Japaneese Foreign Exchange student in one of my classes in HS. She said that nothing much is taught in Japaneese schools about WWII, Nagasaki, Hiroshima, and especially Pearl Harbor. When I was stationed in Germany, I made some German friends. They said that Adolph Hitler's name was never brought up. Nor was Auschwitz or Bukenvald.

Much like every history teacher I've ever had neglects to mention George Washington was a slave owner. It came up once (wayyy back when) and the teacher told us "but he was different because he was very nice to his slaves". Yea. Right.

That said, I see why Germans don't learn about Hitler, and Japanese don't learn about Pearl Harbor. But American schools should focus more on Pearl Harbor and other events of the war, because its not something to be ashamed of.

While we're at it, American schools should probably improve upon the whole math, science, english composition, and social studies things.... Yea.. long way to go.

garandguy10
12-17-2008, 12:56 PM
I did not hear Pearl Harbor mentioned once on T.V. or Radio. Good thing I rarely use T.V. or Listen to AM/FM radio.