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Booshanky
11-21-2008, 1:49 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

dribbler
11-21-2008, 2:20 PM
in, been pondering this same stuff for about a month

stphnman20
11-21-2008, 2:27 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?
Wanted a better life outside the "hood" Also my life wasn't going far!
For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?
HELL YEAH! would I do it over again? YUP
Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?
SEEN it in 03, 04 and 08. No it didn't change my view.. It's the Military not the peace corp!
What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?
DO IT!


Answers in bold

Stockton
11-21-2008, 2:35 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?


My hero's growing up were soldiers. It was explained to me as a teenager what it meant to serve this nation and doing something for society that could never be taken away from me.

Absolutely worth while. I wanted it though. If you don't want or have to be forced into it that please stay out of the military.

Yes, no it did not, don't be fooled by yourself or anyone else, the very first things you are taught is how to listen,move,shoot, and communicate. There is a reason for that.

Advise: Do it because its what you really want. The military isn't for everyone but you need to understand why you would be doing it. Don't do it for money, fame, glory, or anything else. You would only be failing the man standing next to.

dwa
11-21-2008, 3:19 PM
my country was at war and i felt it was my duty to serve my country.
many seem to not be able to understand this, im not able to understand how people can choose not to serve. regardless of your politics your country needs you, some can choose to ignore that i cant. i got all the way out thinking that i had done my part, after some soul searching i decided that i need to do more so now im in the reserve while im in school and intend to return to service as an officer in four years.

Matt C
11-21-2008, 3:30 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

I wanted the training, the experiance, and the chance to serve (joined right after 9/11).

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Absolutely.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

No, it didn't.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Join the Air Force...

Ironchef
11-21-2008, 3:41 PM
I signed back in November of 1990 but was disqualified because I had a 1" patch of psoriasis on my back, so I didn't serve. Been a couch commando ever since..a fanboi as it were.

I just wanted to get out of dodge, get combat training (still want it of course), and Bush 41 was getting ready to invade Iraq so I wanted to go play volleyball in Saudi Arabia or Kuwait!

About 9 years ago I again attempted to go into the Army NG but again, my psoriasis got in the way. I just wanted to be trained, possibly play with toys I paid for with my taxes, maybe help in a disaster. I tried to explain that my dad was a proud 1st sgt in the ANG and he had gobs more psoriasis than I'd ever have. But no go. I'll bet if I enlisted during the last few years, they'd have let me in...but now I'm washed up and plagued with arthritis and i'm a good 60lbs too much man for them! lol Well, that's some of the reason I wouldn't have enlisted in the last few years....the other reasons are best left off this forum.

Vacaville
11-21-2008, 3:44 PM
I was in the Army from '82 to '85. No combat for me, thanks. I was a legal clerk. I joined because there was kind of an unwritten rule in my family that if you didn't go to college, you joined the military. What I picked up:

The good: I learned discipline. Before the military I had about 30 jobs over a couple of years. Since I got out, I have worked for three companies over the past 23 years. I also learned that I am capable of working my way through pain and adversity when most people give up. Basic Training will show you what the human body is truly capable of. And, it's not all physical, a lot of it is mental. I can also get dressed and out of the house in 10 minutes.

What to watch out for: Don't think specific military training is going to open doors for you when you get out. Unless you've learned a specific skill that translates directly to civilian life, like being an electrician or some kind of mechanic, most employers won't give a rat's *** about your MOS (Military Occupational Specialty). That being said, most employers do look favorably on people who have served our country.

If you're a loser and can't make it outside the military, you're not going to make it inside the military. When you get kicked out or quit, you become a BOLO!

Army GI
11-21-2008, 4:35 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?


Mostly family tradition and admiration of the military as an institution. Grandfather was a WW2 vet (fought in the segregated Army units in the Pacific). Father was an LT for a short while before being medically discharged.
Can't really answer that, I've never been deployed. So the only thing I can say from my light experience is that it forced me to grow up in a hurry.
No, thank God. But I will follow orders of called upon to do so.
The first thing that comes to my mind is to make clear to them what the purpose of the military is. It's not boarding school, it's not a job welfare program. It's an institution meant solely for one thing, to fight wars, kill people, and destroy things.


edit: why are you asking this? Are you writing a dissertation or something?

chris
11-21-2008, 5:01 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

I have to say a sense of duty and patriotism mostly. i grew up around servicemembers. neighbors dad was a WWII vet, was in the pacific saw all kinds of stuff. both sons served one in the Marines other the Navy, dad Air Force, both grandparents helped in the war effort in WWII. but i serve mainly for the reason is that the freedom we have is not free it has been paid for in the blood sweat and tears of men and women of this country. some of our finest leaders have been in the military. i personally think you should serve if anyone plans to run for office. see "Starship Troopers". that made sense service entitles you to privalages that others who don't serve are not allowed to have. holding public office is not a right it is to be an honor and privalege to serve in public office.


For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?
my time in continues and will for sometime to come. and it has been 20 yrs. now. i have met some of the funniest and strangest people in the military. but while i was deployed i had the distinct honor and privalege to serve with SF in Iraq. and i can tell you that is an honor to have.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

why yes i have been in combat and i will go again if called upon. in Iraq 05 and 06. great time. i will never forget my tour.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

to serve this country should be an honor as some of the finest men and women have worn the uniform. especially today total strangers will thank you and shake your hand. it is a great time to serve. and at no time should anyone in uniform abuse the kindness of the people of this country. we cannot do our jobs without the support of the people. they are our anchor and we can accomplish our missions placed before us.


do you plan on serving this country or just wanting to find out what makes us serve. sometimes no words can describe why we do it.

there are many reasons to serve.

Maddog5150
11-21-2008, 5:28 PM
Im just a cherry but I do have regrets. My largest regret is that I didnt sign the dotted line at 18 and waited eight years to do so.
I joined because I wanted to serve like my father and his father did. We take so many things for granted and I knew I would probably never really understand the pain and sacrifices made to make my life comfortable. I got tired of sitting on my hands and just being a fan boy and wanted to be one of the good guys to give others the chance of freedom. Just went in late in the game but better late then never.
Second regret is that I cannot afford to go active. Pay for a private is too little for my bills but my next goal is either 82nd or 173rd.
Airborne!

Sometimes friends, family or strangers ask me about the training and if I regret dealing with the heat, humidity, injuries, stress, and some stranger screaming at me. Now Im no hero like some of the guys here, never been over seas and in combat only been away from my family for 20 weeks and not 12-14 months and im just some cherry out of training but I would say that so far, those 20 weeks in benning was the greatest time of my life. I would endure everything all over again in a heart beat. Especially jumpschool :D

If you want to join, dont hesitate and make excuses. You will never look back no matter what branch or MOS you pick... less its MP :p

nick
11-21-2008, 5:32 PM
less its MP :p

+1.

Crosis
11-21-2008, 5:52 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?
I had always wanted to join, my family were all government employees or military... When 9/11 hit I was 17, I walked into the recruiting station that day.

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?
Yes, I learned a lot and I'm a better person for it.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?
Nope, I'm a wounded vet. if I had the chance I'd go back... I had an idea of what to expect My uncle was in a few spats in the middle east before Desert Storm... He is a Sheriff now...

I was deployed from Feb '03 - Oct '03, and Feb '04 - April '05.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

The military isn't for everyone...

Pick a job that's reasonably transferable into civilian life... Grunt/MP = easier to join police force, EOD = Possible Bomb Squad, etc...

A buddy of mine joined the Army, keeps changing his MOS each time he re-enlists... I believe he is an "Artillery Weatherman" currently... I don't foresee that having a whole lot of potential in the civilian world...

hotwls13
11-21-2008, 6:35 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

I have been out for 9 years now. When I joined (back in 90) I had been on pre-enlistment for over a year. I knew I wanted to be in the Air Force at 16. I didn't grow up around Military or really know much about it. I just Knew that's what I wanted.

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Definitely. I am proud to have served.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

No. I deployed a lot of guys during Desert Shield and Storm, as well as other deployments throughout my 9 years.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Pretty much what others have said. THINK about what you would like to do when you get out. Try to get a job while your in doing something similar. It's tough though as most guys going in are young and really don't know what they want to do when they grow up. :) I was Air Transportation and when I got out, I moved back to my small hometown with a small Airport. Hence, NO JOBS in my line of work. :) Luckily I had some computer training and experience.

kermit315
11-21-2008, 7:45 PM
I cant point to a reason why I joined....it just felt like something I needed to do. I joined before 9/11. I was in school during 9/11 and thought my class was going undesignated to the fleet to chock and chain airplanes: it didnt phase me one bit, that was my job at the time. I have always worked hard, and done my job to the best of my abilities, while looking out for my guys at the same time.

My advice to those considering enlisting: dont do it for the college. do it because you want to be there. if you are just doing it for the college money, TA, NCPACE, etc., your head wont be fully in the game, you will be looking at the clock, waiting to get out and dedicate your time to school. if you are there, you need to be all the way there. if you can dedicate yourself to doing 100 percent of your job, and still have the time and motivation to pursue education off duty, you are welcome in my AT shop anytime.

I have launched aircraft guiding ordnance to hostile areas, and seen aircraft come back with no ordnance left, so I guess that is as close to combat as a carrier/squadron Sailor can get without getting an IA billet (that my wife informed me I have to wait for till after our shore duty). Did it change my views, no. We dropped those bombs on people who needed it done, because they were screwed up in the most fundamental sense. Do innocent people get caught in that, yes, and for that I am sorry, but only because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

JMO

11Z50
11-21-2008, 8:23 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

I have been retired for 5 years now. When I joined (back in 74) I knew it was what I was born to do. I got off active duty in '78 and went to college, became a cop, but went back on active duty in '86.

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

HELL YES


Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

Yes. No.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Do it because you love your country.

CavTrooper
11-21-2008, 8:37 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

War. I watched the invasion of Iraq on TV and was very upset that I wasnt there to participate.

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

So far, so good. Its changed my life in many positive ways and taught me alot about the world, people and dealing with many different types of situations.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

Yes. Iraq, '05. It changed the way I felt about garrison life (prefer combat), Marines, and chickens**t leadership.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Dont ever think you arent going to war, regardless of what anyone tells you.

If you arent ready to see death, dont do it.

Dont half-a** it, if youre gonna do it, do it all the way, theres time for "part-time" after active duty.

dwa
11-21-2008, 9:31 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

why do you ask (not trying to be combatative just curious)

Matt C
11-21-2008, 9:42 PM
Can't believe no one has put "college money" down yet. That was the #1 of most people joining when I was getting off AD (around 2004).

nick
11-21-2008, 9:46 PM
Nah, it only paid for a couple of years of college :)

kermit315
11-21-2008, 9:47 PM
well, I did mention college money in my post.....lol.

BB63Squid
11-21-2008, 9:58 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Uncharted territory for you Matich

1. Couldn't relate to my peers and the path they were taking.

2. It was for me.

3. Received combat pay. No.

4. If you are afraid of being uncomfortable, stay on the porch. If you feel you don't owe your country something, stay on the sidelines and watch. If you feel you want to prove something to yourself and see what you are really made of, step up.

11Z50
11-22-2008, 9:40 AM
College money was nice, but that's not why I enlisted. I did take advantage of the GI bill and went to college for 5 years, full and part-time. When I retired, the VA offered vocational rehabilitation since the infantry has no related civilian skills. I went to several training sessions and they paid for a laptop and some other gear.

If you enlist specifically to get college money, you will find it would be much easier (and safer) to simply work hard and save money for school and apply for a grant. I know several soldiers who cited school money as a reason for joining that never went to college. I know a few that actually got a degree while in the Army for little or no expense.

If you served honorably, you should take advantage of any benefits and entitlements you are eliagble for. You earned them.

NiteQwill
11-22-2008, 7:19 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?
Both grandparents were in WWII. Tradition I could say. Not to mention the Army let me choose a very unique and challenging MOS, only very few of us in the service (about 400 qualified) AND I received 2 licensures and a certification to practice in the civilian world.

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?
Yes, for the most part. The only thing I dislike is the backstabbing politics.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?
Yes. Depends how you would perceive a change of perception... For the most part, it makes you appreciate freedoms of those folks who have never served, my service is for them.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?
Go Air Force, seriously. If you want to see combat in the AF, become a PJ/CTT/CTW.
Above

chris
11-23-2008, 5:06 PM
why do you ask (not trying to be combatative just curious)

i would like to the OP to state why he asked this question. i think it would be the right thing to do.

Matt C
11-23-2008, 5:18 PM
i would like to the OP to state why he asked this question. i think it would be the right thing to do.

He can't just be curious?

chris
11-23-2008, 5:20 PM
He can't just be curious?

i'm sure he is. but i can ask as another poster just as he has.

Booshanky
11-24-2008, 7:53 AM
Hey guys, I was up in the Bay Area all weekend doing some photographic work so I didn't have a whole lot of time to be in the interwebs.

I wrote this thread because I'm curious. I'm reading a book right now about the history of American warfare and I just finished a book called "War is a force that gives us meaning" that was quite possibly the most f***ed up and heartbreaking book I've ever read. It's written by a journalist who has covered conflicts from central America to the Balkans, he also happened to be a divinity student before he became a journalist so he writes with a style that really portrays war and the effect it has on people very well.

There are many ways to look at the military. From a macro perspective that shows the effect on nations, to the effect the military has on civilians, to the way that outsiders see it. I've read a lot about the macro perspective, and the way that journalists working in war zones see it, now I want to learn about the way the people in the military see it.


I couldn't ever be in the military I don't think. My mom raised me on the phrase "because I said so" and it irritated me so much growing up that I'm pretty much incapable of following orders without knowing all the details of why I do something. And of course that just doesn't fly in the military. For a more pragmatic reason, I'm covered in tattoos so they'd have to REEEEALY lower their standards on those sorts of things to even let me in. And lastly, the wife would never let me join anyway.


Thanks for everyone who wrote. I appreciate the honesty.

-Mark

dwa
11-24-2008, 12:14 PM
i would like to the OP to state why he asked this question. i think it would be the right thing to do.

i was curious, generally the vibe i get from boo is he is not very appreciative of the military so i was curious why he asked. may i ask why you asked that i asked?

chris
11-24-2008, 12:47 PM
i was curious, generally the vibe i get from boo is he is not very appreciative of the military so i was curious why he asked. may i ask why you asked that i asked?

you perked my curiousity that is why. i did not think about it until i saw your post. but since he has repiled and in a polite manner as both of our requests were polite and were not in any context to be rude in asking. since i have the same feeling you have. maybe since reading the book he read he may have a deeper respect and understanding for what we do and why.

4 Brigada
11-24-2008, 5:39 PM
Cause I look so good in my bag. :rofl2::smilielol5:

MrLogan
11-24-2008, 7:12 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

1. I had always been fascinated by our military history and all things military. Thought about serving after high school, but didn't do it because my family wanted me to go to college. After a year of college, 9/11 happened, and I put off school to serve and do my part.

2. I definitely feel like my time in service is worthwhile. I love this country and am proud of my service.

3. I wouldn't hesitate to encourage enlisting. But I would temper that enthusiasm by telling potential enlistees that, like any other job, the military experience will have both good and bad experiences. But overall, a great experience. A million dollar experience that you wouldn't pay a penny for, but great nonetheless. :D

Booshanky
11-25-2008, 8:19 AM
you perked my curiousity that is why. i did not think about it until i saw your post. but since he has repiled and in a polite manner as both of our requests were polite and were not in any context to be rude in asking. since i have the same feeling you have. maybe since reading the book he read he may have a deeper respect and understanding for what we do and why.

It's not that I have a disrespect for the people who serve in the military, I just think that the way our military has been used by our elected leaders has been inappropriate.

Is that unreasonable? Do you honestly feel that everything our military has done over the last 8 years was worthwhile? Have we made no mistakes?

Just because I think that the Iraq war was a mistake does not mean that I think less of those who serve in the military.

Jamez
11-25-2008, 9:46 AM
1. Big family history
2. It was either that or smoke tons of pot and fail out of college (i wasn't very productive in my high school years HA!)

chris
11-25-2008, 9:55 AM
It's not that I have a disrespect for the people who serve in the military, I just think that the way our military has been used by our elected leaders has been inappropriate.

It depends on what the use is. we are engaged in a war. in the 90's the military was used in more peacekeeping missions than anything. i did not get deployed in any of those. i only herd the fallout of such use other than warefare. ya know blow things up and break things not nation building. we are doing that in Iraq after a conflict with them.

Is that unreasonable? Do you honestly feel that everything our military has done over the last 8 years was worthwhile? Have we made no mistakes?

yes there have been many mistakes that is a given it's the military. nothing goes to plan. no plan survives intial contact (murphy's law of combat) Afghanistan is defenitly the right thing to do. Iraq was an elective war and we chose to do it. also i think the heads at the Pentegon wanted to see if we can fight 2 wars at the same time. also during the last 8 years our equipment is way better than it was in the 90's. active, reserve and guard are getting new equipment pretty much at the same time the active force is, not years later. our pay and benefits have increased alot since also. but this not a perfect world if it was there would be no war, if there was anything planned for that conflict would go perfectly to plan.

since i have been to Iraq i have a different view than most. i considered my deployment quite unique than most. i was able to interact with the Iraqi people often and did see more of a positive result of us being there. but there will always be people in any country that don't want you there. those people IMO are the ones that benefited from Saddams rule and are now on the same level as the people they may have had oppressed. just my opinion. as i saw a great many things that i have relized more in the 2 yrs. since i have been home.

Just because I think that the Iraq war was a mistake does not mean that I think less of those who serve in the military.

if anything since the Iraq war began people have had a better view of the military and of course Afghanistan. but Iraq really put us in the spotlight so to say. go to an airport in uniform and it's almost guarrenteed that someone will buy you a drink. also being in public people will thank us for our service and so on. again i think the American public has learned a lot in the last 8 yrs. of our service our sacrifice and our dedication to serving this country. i have never been more proud to serve this country since returning from Iraq. it is a great feeling and to be honest, and hard to do without shedding a tear.




hope this helps.

NOTE: my question as to why you created this thread was in no way to be hostile towards you. just a general question.

new cal shooter
11-25-2008, 12:34 PM
"Cause......." :)

chris
11-25-2008, 12:37 PM
"Cause I did'nt went to College"

dude this thread is more directed to those that have rather than those that have not.

new cal shooter
11-25-2008, 12:42 PM
No really,
I did not feel I could do the higher education thing and am currently active
E-7, never looked back, all kinds of travel, good times :)

chris
11-25-2008, 12:53 PM
No really,
I did not feel I could do the higher education thing and am currently active
E-7, never looked back, all kinds of travel, good times :)

your first post did not state that you were an E-7.

Quote:
Originally Posted by new cal shooter
"Cause I did'nt went to College"

pdq_wizzard
11-25-2008, 12:57 PM
[QUOTE=Crosis;1717662]

The military isn't for everyone...

Pick a job that's reasonably transferable into civilian life... Grunt/MP = easier to join police force, EOD = Possible Bomb Squad, etc...
QUOTE]

From what I understand MP dose not = easier to a LEO job, as the laws in the military do not translate to civilian life very well, I know it is next to imposable to join the Sacramento Sheriff's Department if you were an MP.

Booshanky
11-25-2008, 1:43 PM
hope this helps.

NOTE: my question as to why you created this thread was in no way to be hostile towards you. just a general question.

It's cool.

Personally I've found a lot of guys in the military to be arrogant, rude, and holier than thou. At the same time, I've got a lot of friends in the military who are just the opposite. Just like Law Enforcement, it's a type of job that can attract people who enjoy abusing the power that they're given. People who make up for a lack of self esteem by using their title to become above others.

By saying that, I don't mean to denigrate military service by any means, it's just another reason that I wouldn't want to serve. The majority of people I've met in the service are the type that I wouldn't want to be around.

I've spoken it over with the wife and we both said that the only way we'd serve in the military would be if we could both be stationed together and if we were fighting a war here on American soil.

dwa
11-25-2008, 3:27 PM
It's cool.

Personally I've found a lot of guys in the military to be arrogant, rude, and holier than thou. At the same time, I've got a lot of friends in the military who are just the opposite. Just like Law Enforcement, it's a type of job that can attract people who enjoy abusing the power that they're given. People who make up for a lack of self esteem by using their title to become above others.

By saying that, I don't mean to denigrate military service by any means, it's just another reason that I wouldn't want to serve. The majority of people I've met in the service are the type that I wouldn't want to be around.

I've spoken it over with the wife and we both said that the only way we'd serve in the military would be if we could both be stationed together and if we were fighting a war here on American soil.

the military draws its numbers from the citizenry of the us which includes a**holes and holier than thou arts, so yes there are some. there's the other side of it too, imagine you went to this horrible place where its 120 in the day 90 at night during the summer and cold as balls in the winter, the earth literally smells of feces, the people have an average IQ of 10 and someone who outranks you always has a brilliant idea that causes you too loose sleep. you wear around 60lbs of gear everyday which seems it was designed to purposely hurt your back, all of the vehicles you ride in were designed for the residents of lilliput from Gulliver's travels and most of the natives exhibit minimal effort to be competent in anything. you were there for 15 months you get to go home for 12 and then go back. oh i forgot some of your friends died, and not just one.

now while your on your 12 month break you hear some guy in 24 hour fitness telling some other guy about how GW faked 911 and osama was framed or some other liberal fantasy I'm sure you've at least heard of. your response to said remark could come off as sightly arrogant rude or holier than thou art. somethings you just cant understand unless you have been though them, then again you cold just have ran into a d***he.

Matt C
11-25-2008, 3:29 PM
I've spoken it over with the wife and we both said that the only way we'd serve in the military would be if we could both be stationed together and if we were fighting a war here on American soil.

While I can understand why you would only fight a war on US soil (assuming it's for moral reasons, not because you don't like travel). On the other hand, stating you would not fight if you had to separate from your wife really shows that you lack the ability to sacrifice or endure hardship in order to defend your country. Lucky for you there are better men that will stand up when you won't (yes they are better, sorry if that makes me sound "holier than thou") so that you can have the luxury of not fighting. And I'm sure they won't mind if you don't want to hang around them.

Sorry if that sounds harsh, but you posted it.

6172crew
11-25-2008, 5:30 PM
Answers in bold
Pretty much the same for me. I tried school and didnt like it. I think its the best thing that I have done so far in my life. The other stuff is muted.

Booshanky
11-25-2008, 7:33 PM
While I can understand why you would only fight a war on US soil (assuming it's for moral reasons, not because you don't like travel).

Yeah, moral reasons. I disagree with almost every military action our country has taken since WWII.

On the other hand, stating you would not fight if you had to separate from your wife really shows that you lack the ability to sacrifice or endure hardship in order to defend your country. Lucky for you there are better men that will stand up when you won't (yes they are better, sorry if that makes me sound "holier than thou") so that you can have the luxury of not fighting. And I'm sure they won't mind if you don't want to hang around them.

Sorry if that sounds harsh, but you posted it.

My wife is a damn fine shot, one of the smartest people I know, and there are few people I trust with my back more than her.

I don't know why you want to turn into a pissing match of who would possibly sacrifice more in some completely hypothetical situation that most likely would never happen in our lifetime. Who knows what we'll do if the time came down to it. I might not even join the military then depending on the leadership of our government at the time.

But this is all just pure speculation on our parts, with us knowing nothing about what the real situation might look like.

Booshanky
11-25-2008, 7:45 PM
the military draws its numbers from the citizenry of the us which includes a**holes and holier than thou arts, so yes there are some. there's the other side of it too, imagine you went to this horrible place where its 120 in the day 90 at night during the summer and cold as balls in the winter, the earth literally smells of feces, the people have an average IQ of 10 and someone who outranks you always has a brilliant idea that causes you too loose sleep. you wear around 60lbs of gear everyday which seems it was designed to purposely hurt your back, all of the vehicles you ride in were designed for the residents of lilliput from Gulliver's travels and most of the natives exhibit minimal effort to be competent in anything. you were there for 15 months you get to go home for 12 and then go back. oh i forgot some of your friends died, and not just one.

I agree, that'd pretty much suck more than anything.

My personal experience though is mostly with members of the military who had not been to war zones. I grew up in Reno NV, and I knew a lot of people who joined the military after high school. I'd run into them in bars with their girlfriends and they were always the least amicable people I've met. Flaunting their uniforms and looking for fights.

And again, I also have some really good friends who are in the military. A buddy of mine just got back from Gitmo, one who did three tours in Iraq at the beginning of the war, and I've got another who is in Iraq right now. They're some of the nicest people I know.

But like I said, I think it's just one of those jobs that tends to attract the jerks because it gives them the authority they lack in their normal every day lives.

Not trying to be stereotypical or judgmental by any means, just my personal observations.

now while your on your 12 month break you hear some guy in 24 hour fitness telling some other guy about how GW faked 911 and osama was framed or some other liberal fantasy I'm sure you've at least heard of. your response to said remark could come off as sightly arrogant rude or holier than thou art. somethings you just cant understand unless you have been though them, then again you cold just have ran into a d***he.

Oh believe me, the 9/11 truthers are some of the most godawful annoying people on the face of the earth. I'm on your side there.

dwa
11-25-2008, 8:54 PM
I agree, that'd pretty much suck more than anything.

My personal experience though is mostly with members of the military who had not been to war zones. I grew up in Reno NV, and I knew a lot of people who joined the military after high school. I'd run into them in bars with their girlfriends and they were always the least amicable people I've met. Flaunting their uniforms and looking for fights.

generally i don't have a high opinion of people who haven't deployed or who aren't in combat arms that think they're bad asses

And again, I also have some really good friends who are in the military. A buddy of mine just got back from Gitmo, one who did three tours in Iraq at the beginning of the war, and I've got another who is in Iraq right now. They're some of the nicest people I know.

But like I said, I think it's just one of those jobs that tends to attract the jerks because it gives them the authority they lack in their normal every day lives.

yes and no i believe your a photographer? do you meet a lot of stuck up jerks there? most the people your thinking of probably aren't well liked within the military. you don't start off with authority some of the time you have to earn it, it takes awhile to get any I'm guessing the guys you had problems with were lower enlisted which goes back to you only get whats in the pool you draw from. there was a photographer that broke down crying when we got hit with an ied that doesn't make me think all photographers would break down crying.

Not trying to be stereotypical or judgmental by any means, just my personal observations.

i didn't think you were but you are hard to figure out, you've said things that i agree with and things that make me want to choke you (figureativly) but "But like I said, I think it's just one of those jobs that tends to attract the jerks because it gives them the authority they lack in their normal every day lives." that sounds fairly judgemental to me



Oh believe me, the 9/11 truthers are some of the most godawful annoying people on the face of the earth. I'm on your side there.

the part about that was a true story i nearly lost control and had to leave after i b*tched him out, lol i still get mad thinking of it

MrLogan
11-25-2008, 8:57 PM
I agree, that'd pretty much suck more than anything.

My personal experience though is mostly with members of the military who had not been to war zones. I grew up in Reno NV, and I knew a lot of people who joined the military after high school. I'd run into them in bars with their girlfriends and they were always the least amicable people I've met. Flaunting their uniforms and looking for fights.
And again, I also have some really good friends who are in the military. A buddy of mine just got back from Gitmo, one who did three tours in Iraq at the beginning of the war, and I've got another who is in Iraq right now. They're some of the nicest people I know.

But like I said, I think it's just one of those jobs that tends to attract the jerks because it gives them the authority they lack in their normal every day lives.

Not trying to be stereotypical or judgmental by any means, just my personal observations.



Oh believe me, the 9/11 truthers are some of the most godawful annoying people on the face of the earth. I'm on your side there.

This tends to be the ones who're much younger, or the ones who have never matured.

I think a lot of what comes off as arrogance is that we go through a lot of hardships and make a lot of sacrifices that most people who haven't experienced just don't fully understand. It makes it difficult to relate to civilians, as they can't relate to you.

Like in any job, we have our share of jerks. But to put it into perspective, a service member "is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel."

goathead
11-26-2008, 12:24 AM
i was curious, generally the vibe i get from boo is he is not very appreciative of the military so i was curious why he asked. may i ask why you asked that i asked?

that's why i will not answer... that all i will say

Crosis
11-26-2008, 3:25 AM
The military isn't for everyone...

Pick a job that's reasonably transferable into civilian life... Grunt/MP = easier to join police force, EOD = Possible Bomb Squad, etc...


From what I understand MP dose not = easier to a LEO job, as the laws in the military do not translate to civilian life very well, I know it is next to imposable to join the Sacramento Sheriff's Department if you were an MP.

I know a few Marines who got out after being MP's with jobs in the NYPD and their local police departments (other states)... Maybe here in Cali its a bit harder but, in a large majority of states its not... You still have to go through Police Academy and all (according to my interview with the LAPD)... When I was getting out LAPD, CHP, and SDPD were all on base trying to get Marines interested in joining the force...

Booshanky
11-26-2008, 6:25 AM
This tends to be the ones who're much younger, or the ones who have never matured.

I think a lot of what comes off as arrogance is that we go through a lot of hardships and make a lot of sacrifices that most people who haven't experienced just don't fully understand. It makes it difficult to relate to civilians, as they can't relate to you.

Like in any job, we have our share of jerks. But to put it into perspective, a service member "is the barroom loudmouth, dumber than five wooden planks, whose overgrown frat-boy behavior is outweighed a hundred times in the cosmic scales by four hours of exquisite bravery near the 38th parallel."


True, I moved to LA when I was 21 so the guys I'm talking about were younger. And the guys I know in the military here in LA are a hell of a lot nicer than those dudes.

It could be the age thing, or it could be that anyone in Reno who joins the military is an arrogant hick. haha.

11Z50
11-26-2008, 9:12 AM
Booshanky, let me give you some TR:

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who, at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt

You, as one of the protected, live in the margin of safety created by those of us who stood up and served our country. Certainly, we are flawed and often perceived as arrogant or rude by those we protect. As a veteran, I don't want to be revered or even honored by civilians. I just ask that they understand the sacrifices that have been made for them, and respect those who defend our way of life.

Booshanky, you can sit back and pick and choose what you would defend, where you would fight, and with what degree of enthusiasm. That's nice. But that's not how it works. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, I would advise you not to spout it off in the presence of veterans. They will become annoyed, and that will not be a pleasant experience for you.

chris
11-28-2008, 3:47 PM
Booshanky, let me give you some TR:

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who, at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt

You, as one of the protected, live in the margin of safety created by those of us who stood up and served our country. Certainly, we are flawed and often perceived as arrogant or rude by those we protect. As a veteran, I don't want to be revered or even honored by civilians. I just ask that they understand the sacrifices that have been made for them, and respect those who defend our way of life.

Booshanky, you can sit back and pick and choose what you would defend, where you would fight, and with what degree of enthusiasm. That's nice. But that's not how it works. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, I would advise you not to spout it off in the presence of veterans. They will become annoyed, and that will not be a pleasant experience for you.

well said.

MolonLabe2008
12-01-2008, 8:44 AM
I would like to thank all who have served. Your sacrifices and loyalty to our Nation are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

But, all who have responded to Boo's OP were baited. Boo's continued dialogue in this thread is showing his true colors, which is military bashing.

MrSlippyFist
12-01-2008, 8:50 AM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

All my friends were doing it.

On a small scale, for the life experiences and friends I made.

Yes. No.

Do it, you pansy.

MolonLabe2008
12-01-2008, 2:14 PM
Booshanky wrote:
I couldn't ever be in the military I don't think. My mom raised me on the phrase "because I said so" and it irritated me so much growing up that I'm pretty much incapable of following orders without knowing all the details of why I do something.

So, what you are saying is that you don't like to be told what to do? That's odd, because you are so much into big government telling everyone else how to live their lives.

Maybe if your Dad was around, you might have turned out differently.

Matt C
12-01-2008, 2:18 PM
Maybe if your Dad was around, you might have turned out differently.

I don't know where you are coming from, but that comment sounds totally out of line. :mad:

MolonLabe2008
12-01-2008, 2:32 PM
Blackwater OPS wrote:
I don't know where you are coming from, but that comment sounds totally out of line.

So, it is OK for him to blame his mother for the way he turned out? :mad:

MrSlippyFist
12-01-2008, 2:36 PM
Nope. We'll start by not blaming yours.

EOD3
12-01-2008, 2:39 PM
Booshanky, let me give you some TR:

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who, at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt

You, as one of the protected, live in the margin of safety created by those of us who stood up and served our country. Certainly, we are flawed and often perceived as arrogant or rude by those we protect. As a veteran, I don't want to be revered or even honored by civilians. I just ask that they understand the sacrifices that have been made for them, and respect those who defend our way of life.

Booshanky, you can sit back and pick and choose what you would defend, where you would fight, and with what degree of enthusiasm. That's nice. But that's not how it works. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, I would advise you not to spout it off in the presence of veterans. They will become annoyed, and that will not be a pleasant experience for you.


Words to live by...

MolonLabe2008
12-01-2008, 2:48 PM
MrSlippyFist wrote:
Nope. We'll start by not blaming yours.

Boo said the following about his mother...

I couldn't ever be in the military I don't think. My mom raised me on the phrase "because I said so" and it irritated me so much growing up that I'm pretty much incapable of following orders without knowing all the details of why I do something.

So, Boo blamed his mother for the way he turned out. I'm trying to defend his mother and you are getting on my case.

Matt C
12-01-2008, 2:48 PM
So, it is OK for him to blame his mother for the way he turned out? :mad:

I don't know what you are talking about, but my father was not around when I was growing up and your comment really touches a nerve. Why don't you just leave people's parents out of it? This is not the third grade.

MrSlippyFist
12-01-2008, 2:57 PM
Boo said the following about is mother...



So, Boo blamed his mother for the way he turned out. I'm trying to defend his mother and you are getting on my case.

I don't see that as blaming his mother. And i'm the first to start complaining about crap like that. It seems to be the mantra of today's youth, just listen to the whiny rock on the radio.

PatriotnMore
12-01-2008, 3:10 PM
For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile? Absolutely, I tell my boys and their friends, IMHO, everyone should serve. We have something worth fighting for, and making a small time commitment to make it better and safe, is everyone's responsibility.

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service? NO

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Take your time and get good advice, get schooling that can be used once you get out. Make the best of it, its about serving others and the greater good, you'll have your whole life to do for yourself when you get out.

6172crew
12-01-2008, 4:20 PM
Take it easy guys, let's leave my mom put of this.

gwl
12-01-2008, 5:58 PM
Booshanky, let me give you some TR:

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who, at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt

You, as one of the protected, live in the margin of safety created by those of us who stood up and served our country. Certainly, we are flawed and often perceived as arrogant or rude by those we protect. As a veteran, I don't want to be revered or even honored by civilians. I just ask that they understand the sacrifices that have been made for them, and respect those who defend our way of life.

Booshanky, you can sit back and pick and choose what you would defend, where you would fight, and with what degree of enthusiasm. That's nice. But that's not how it works. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, I would advise you not to spout it off in the presence of veterans. They will become annoyed, and that will not be a pleasant experience for you.

Bravo MSG!

goathead
12-01-2008, 6:15 PM
I would like to thank all who have served. Your sacrifices and loyalty to our Nation are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

But, all who have responded to Boo's OP were baited. Boo's continued dialogue in this thread is showing his true colors, which is military bashing.

1++++ on that ... that's why i didn't answer

Futurecollector
12-01-2008, 10:11 PM
Well the AF is paying for my schooling so thats how they roped me in but i would have Enlisted either way, and i am doing ti because we have the best country in the world, and i like it here and i feel as thought it is partly my responsibility to help in any way i can.

to those of you CG on here that have served I thank you for you selflessness and bravery and i truly thank you for the sacrifice you made no matter how big nor small Thanks.

Booshanky
12-02-2008, 10:00 AM
I would like to thank all who have served. Your sacrifices and loyalty to our Nation are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

But, all who have responded to Boo's OP were baited. Boo's continued dialogue in this thread is showing his true colors, which is military bashing.

What I've said can only be considered "military bashing" if you believe that people in the military should only be discussed in glowing terms at all times.

People in the military are human beings just like you or I. They are drawn from the population at large and because of that there are going to be some really amazing people and some lowlife jerks. I've known both. I have a friend who's serving in Iraq right now who is one of the nicest guys I know. I've also known people who joined the military because they just wanted to have some authority, and as such abused it on a constant basis.

If anything, I'd say that I have a deep appreciation for the military because I view it without blinders.

Booshanky
12-02-2008, 10:04 AM
So, what you are saying is that you don't like to be told what to do? That's odd, because you are so much into big government telling everyone else how to live their lives.

I'm saying I don't like to be told what to do without knowing the "why" of it.

Maybe if your Dad was around, you might have turned out differently.

That's true, who knows what kind of a person I might have become? While I'm sure you'd disagree, I think my mom did a damn fine job of raising me. She worked three jobs as a single mom and my sister and I have both turned out to be successful people.

Booshanky
12-02-2008, 10:06 AM
So, it is OK for him to blame his mother for the way he turned out? :mad:

Why on earth do you care what I think of my mom? Why do you presume to know anything about her?

Booshanky
12-02-2008, 10:07 AM
Boo said the following about his mother...



So, Boo blamed his mother for the way he turned out. I'm trying to defend his mother and you are getting on my case.

Are you some sort of magical being who was not influenced in any way by the way your parents raised you or something? I'm really confused why you're being so rude here.

Booshanky
12-02-2008, 10:09 AM
I don't know what you are talking about, but my father was not around when I was growing up and your comment really touches a nerve. Why don't you just leave people's parents out of it? This is not the third grade.

To top it off, I was raised by a single mom who was also gay. So yeah, that's influenced the way I think a lot too.

dwa
12-02-2008, 2:51 PM
To top it off, I was raised by a single mom who was also gay. So yeah, that's influenced the way I think a lot too.

im not trying to pick a fight but im asummeing you had a biological father, if you did then is your mom then bisexual and not gay?

Army GI
12-02-2008, 7:01 PM
im not trying to pick a fight but im asummeing you had a biological father, if you did then is your mom then bisexual and not gay?

Well, as mentioned before dad is gone. So it's not a stretch to say that mom probably turned gay.

Booshanky
12-03-2008, 7:55 AM
im not trying to pick a fight but im asummeing you had a biological father, if you did then is your mom then bisexual and not gay?

Good question. I personally think she's asexual since I don't think she's dated anyone seriously in about 15 years.

And my dad is around, he lives in Chicago and we get along great.

Booshanky
12-03-2008, 7:56 AM
Well, as mentioned before dad is gone. So it's not a stretch to say that mom probably turned gay.

Yeah, it was a really bad divorce and my mom still hates my dad to this day. So I wouldn't be surprised if she just went gay out of spite for men. Who knows?

dwa
12-03-2008, 2:07 PM
Good question. I personally think she's asexual since I don't think she's dated anyone seriously in about 15 years.

And my dad is around, he lives in Chicago and we get along great.

without more information im going to have to say that shes less homosexual and more just angry at men. perhaps if she had some lesbian experiances (i dont recall you specifiying) it was more of an "all men are dogs" kinda thing.

Casual Observer
12-03-2008, 4:31 PM
I love how this has devolved into a discussion about Boo's Mom's sex life.

I joined because my father served, his father served, his father served, etc.

It was something I felt I had to do. This country isn't great, but it's pretty damn good and we benefit by living here that I believe everyone should give back in some way (Robert Heinlein was sooo right.)

And Boo, I know some of my friends who are a bit arrogant too. But I understand that. Most civilians these days, especially my age (20's) are a bunch of spoon fed, whiny little *****es who wear their sister's jeans and complain about how "tough" their lives are when, really, they lead cushy pampered lives and have never had to go through true hardships or sacrifice that almost everyone in the military goes through at some time or another. By comparison, you don't often see military members speaking down to a steel mill worker or a farm hand who does back-breaking labor from before dawn until after dark do you?

jkasandiego
12-03-2008, 4:59 PM
I would like to thank all who have served. Your sacrifices and loyalty to our Nation are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

But, all who have responded to Boo's OP were baited. Boo's continued dialogue in this thread is showing his true colors, which is military bashing.

+10000.
Proud to be a veteran !!!

new cal shooter
12-03-2008, 6:07 PM
Would be nice if High Schools gave more time to the Services to show how good it really is.[/QUOTE]

Vacaville
12-03-2008, 6:07 PM
Would be nice if it High Schools gave more time to the Services to show how good it really is.

I'm willing to bet that as the economy continues to get worse you'll see more interest in the military.

new cal shooter
12-03-2008, 6:13 PM
Well I hope they join for the right reasons, I've seen some "I don't want to be here" attitudes these days, takes a toll on everyone.

capo
12-03-2008, 8:28 PM
My service is a little different than most others on here, as I am with the California State Military Reserve. We're a component of the California National Guard, but we're 100% Title 32, and cannot be put on Title 10 active duty. You can think about it as the reserve, to the reserve, to the reserve. But, we do it all out of love and respect for those who serve in Title 10 active duty roles, and our main mission is to get them trained, and prepared for active duty missions, and back them up in their homeland security mission here in CA. To answer your questions...

1) For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?
- Respect for the uniform, and for those who put their life on the line for their brothers and sisters in arms.

2) For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?
- N/A

3) Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?
- No, the CSMR is not a combat arms branch...yet...?

4) What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?
- Do it. Go federal, go active, and when you are done, email me.

chris
12-04-2008, 5:17 AM
I would like to thank all who have served. Your sacrifices and loyalty to our Nation are greatly appreciated. Thank you.

But, all who have responded to Boo's OP were baited. Boo's continued dialogue in this thread is showing his true colors, which is military bashing.

yep this thread seemed like it was a polite and concise question as to why we serve and again boo. this thread has evolved into a discussion about your moms nasty divorce and that she is gay now. come on dude don't be rude to the men and women who served and answered your question politely. this is the type of crap guys and gals who serve don't like. i know it may be hard to return to the topic at hand. there has not been much flaming in this thread but boo the respect you say you have is a little thin with me and others here.

The Soup Nazi
12-11-2008, 7:11 PM
Don't join if you think hailing from a broken home or poor upbringing somehow makes you part of an entitled class and free to mooch pizza off of me in the barracks.

Me and one of the recruiters at my office and I had a real man to man talk. Put it this way, I told him, "The best Marines are those who actually have something to lose and join not for any tangible benefit, but rather, do so out of a total sense of civic virtue and loyalty towards the state." Staff Sergeant who saw a tour in Iraq and went to the same MOS school as mine told me, "Yeah, but those are few and far between."

I'll be hitting my 6 month milestone in the Marine Corps in 4 days. I sacrificed a spot of 100 for a business school's first undergraduate offering after beating out roughly 6000 applicants, as well as my youthful mentality (Months of recruit training and a personal look into FOB life in Iraq/Afghanistan developed a salty "get the hell over it" mindset towards myself and my fellow Marines.). Is it worth it so far? I can say yes, I would've been living a much more sedentary lifestyle even after college if I went straight in as a civilian. There's a certain perspective on civilians that's hard to understand until you cross over into the Green/Blue.

For those who think about enlisting/pursuing a commission, look in yourself first. "but the facts are that we are getting hard pushed to find things for all the volunteers to do that aren't just glorified KP. You can't all be real military men; we don't need that many and most of the volunteers aren't number-one soldier material anyhow...We've had to think up a whole list of dirty, nasty, dangerous jobs that will...at the very least make them remember for the rest of their lives that their citizenship is valuable to them because they've paid a high price for it...A term of service is...either real military service, rough and dangerous even in peacetime...or a most unreasonable facsimile thereof." Going in trying to count down to your time to reap that GI Bill or wondering when you'll get to separate 3 months in does nothing good for yourself or your brothers in arms.

arfan66
12-23-2008, 10:53 PM
Booshanky, let me give you some TR:

It is not the critic who counts, not the man who points out how the strong man stumbled, or where the doer of deeds could have done better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena; whose face is marred by the dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs and comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error or shortcoming; who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best, knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who, at worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly; so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory or defeat.
Theodore Roosevelt

You, as one of the protected, live in the margin of safety created by those of us who stood up and served our country. Certainly, we are flawed and often perceived as arrogant or rude by those we protect. As a veteran, I don't want to be revered or even honored by civilians. I just ask that they understand the sacrifices that have been made for them, and respect those who defend our way of life.

Booshanky, you can sit back and pick and choose what you would defend, where you would fight, and with what degree of enthusiasm. That's nice. But that's not how it works. While you are certainly entitled to your opinions, I would advise you not to spout it off in the presence of veterans. They will become annoyed, and that will not be a pleasant experience for you.

Well said. I am a bit annoyed but I 'll answer his questions anyway.

arfan66
12-23-2008, 11:15 PM
For those calgunners who are in one of the branches of the military, what prompted you to sign on the dotted line?

Two generations of Retired G.I.'s to teach me honor, integrity & humility. I am a first generation American (my family emigrated from the Philippines). My Grandfather, Father and I are grateful for the opportunities and freedoms provided by this great nation. Our service is payback.

For those who are veterans, do you feel that your time in the service was worthwhile?

ABSOLUTELY

Have any of you seen combat? If so, did that change your view of military service?

No, but I have many friends that have.

What advice would you give to those who are thinking of enlisting?

Get educated. Military life's a bit easier as a commissioned officer.

You get what you give. If all you do is take..............