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View Full Version : So exactly whats the deal with breaking in a C/L AR


Artery
11-01-2008, 1:59 AM
I know I'm a new poster, but yes, I've used the search, I just can't figure out what the real deal is on breaking in a chrome lined AR. This will be my first chrome lined barrel. Its a 16in 1 in 9 twist chambered in 5.56. I've always been part of the shoot once, clean, shoot once, clean for the first box or so, then shoot five, clean for the next box, etc.

I just read my favorite barrel cleaner, hoppe's no. 9, isn't suitable for cleaning chrome lined barrels? :eek: That break free is better? I've always thought break free was strictly a lubricant.

My upper is in the mail, so she hasn't even seen a single round yet, what are your guys' thoughts on proper break in? Ammunition? Cleaning frequency? Cleaning chemical? I'm willing to do whatever procedure is necessary even if it only grants me a 1% improvement in accuracy or longevity.

paladin4415
11-01-2008, 8:17 AM
Hi Artery,
With a chrome lined barrel you don't need to do any type of "break in". Just shoot it and then shoot it some more. That is the joy of a chrome lined barrel. I don't know what you read, but Hoppes #9 will work fine as a cleaner for your new upper. Break Free is CLP, which stands for Cleaner-Lubricant-Protectant. It is an all in one product, which is probably why the military adopted it. It works, but I think there are both better cleaners and better lubes available. An AR likes to run "wet" so make sure you lube it liberally. Properly lubed, you will only need to clean it every 2000 to 3000 rounds. If you are used to guns that you clean every time you shoot 10 or 20 rounds, you will probably have a very hard time putting it away dirty, but you can.
Just go out and shoot it and enjoy your new carbine.

Max-the-Silent
11-01-2008, 8:55 AM
I know I'm a new poster, but yes, I've used the search, I just can't figure out what the real deal is on breaking in a chrome lined AR. This will be my first chrome lined barrel. Its a 16in 1 in 9 twist chambered in 5.56. I've always been part of the shoot once, clean, shoot once, clean for the first box or so, then shoot five, clean for the next box, etc.

I just read my favorite barrel cleaner, hoppe's no. 9, isn't suitable for cleaning chrome lined barrels? :eek: That break free is better? I've always thought break free was strictly a lubricant.

My upper is in the mail, so she hasn't even seen a single round yet, what are your guys' thoughts on proper break in? Ammunition? Cleaning frequency? Cleaning chemical? I'm willing to do whatever procedure is necessary even if it only grants me a 1% improvement in accuracy or longevity.

"Breaking-in" an AR type rifle barrel, chromed or otherwise is a waste of time.

You will not see any measurable difference in accuracy between a "broken-in" AR type barrel and a Barrel that was shot hot from round one.

If you're talking about a difference between a properly cared for semi auto fire AR barrel and a mad-minute veteran 16 barrel yes, but for all intents and civilian (non-NFA) purposes, barrel break in is not needed on AR (or any other semi-auto imo) type rifles.

Mark One
11-01-2008, 11:40 AM
How would someone go about breaking a barrel in? Like you said I wont need to do it but I am curious.

Satex
11-01-2008, 11:44 AM
I've always been part of the shoot once, clean, shoot once, clean for the first box or so, then shoot five, clean for the next box, etc.


That process is absolutely not needed. But if it makes you feel better about your rifle - go ahead and do it.

aplinker
11-01-2008, 11:52 AM
I think this is an interesting thread archive...

http://www.snipercountry.com/Articles/Barrel_BreakIn.asp

bwiese
11-01-2008, 12:05 PM
Especially with a chrome-lined barrel, "just shoot it".

For safety and first firing and/or if the gun's been sitting around for awhile, always clear the bore with a boresnake or a CLP-lubed patch followed by dry patch (just to ensure no clutter/obstructions).

Oh - use CLP for bore cleaning on chrome-lined barrels: do not use ammonated solvents like Hoppe's #9 or Hoppe's Copper Solvent as the ammonia can be harmful to chrome lining. If you find you have done so quickly use CLP to clean the bore completely.

Artery
11-01-2008, 12:29 PM
Well, I'm coming from the world of M1As, M14s, M21s, Springfields, Garands, Remmington 700s, etc, hence my love of hoppes 9.

I believe (maybe now believed) in barrel break in just because the first patches I run seem to be much dirtier than subsequent patches. I'll admit this may be my imagination.

I'm fine with running CLP through the barrel rather than Hoppes if thats the way to do it. I've always thought that hoppes was ideal because of its solvent properties, that it broke up deposits on the barrel to make them easier to remove, but it seems like what I've read states that the chrome surface makes it unnecessary to break up any deposits as that they are much easier to remove off of a chrome surface.

Admittedly, I don't even know what chrome lining does to the reliability of the rifle on a physical level, I've just heard about the Vietnam era story about how the barrels weren't chrome lined due to budgetary bs and latter were once it was determined how effective it was to chrome line the barrel.

What parts am I to lubricate with CLP? Does the gas tube ever need to be cleaned? If I really can go 2000+ rounds between cleanings I may become an AR convert.

aplinker
11-01-2008, 12:48 PM
The only things that really need to be cleaned on an AR are the bolt carrier (if in a rush, just spray it down with CLP and shake) and the chamber (swab it out).

Gas tubes should not be cleaned. They're self limiting in fouling.

Chrome is much harder and slicker than steel so the slickness reduces build-up of gunk which can lead to stuck cartridges and it enhances barrel durability and life.

Well, I'm coming from the world of M1As, M14s, M21s, Springfields, Garands, Remmington 700s, etc, hence my love of hoppes 9.

I believe (maybe now believed) in barrel break in just because the first patches I run seem to be much dirtier than subsequent patches. I'll admit this may be my imagination.

I'm fine with running CLP through the barrel rather than Hoppes if thats the way to do it. I've always thought that hoppes was ideal because of its solvent properties, that it broke up deposits on the barrel to make them easier to remove, but it seems like what I've read states that the chrome surface makes it unnecessary to break up any deposits as that they are much easier to remove off of a chrome surface.

Admittedly, I don't even know what chrome lining does to the reliability of the rifle on a physical level, I've just heard about the Vietnam era story about how the barrels weren't chrome lined due to budgetary bs and latter were once it was determined how effective it was to chrome line the barrel.

What parts am I to lubricate with CLP? Does the gas tube ever need to be cleaned? If I really can go 2000+ rounds between cleanings I may become an AR convert.

Lon Moer
11-01-2008, 1:14 PM
For a chromelined barrel; clean it, go shoot 300rds, clean it. Its done.
But, if you really want to follow a procedure, DSA has one on their website. Breaking in that new Barrel (http://www.dsarms.com/brebarrel.asp)

LibertyGuy
11-01-2008, 2:14 PM
The gas tube doesn't have to be cleaned? So I guess there would be no point in buing those little gas tube brushes huh?

aplinker
11-01-2008, 2:23 PM
The gas tube doesn't have to be cleaned? So I guess there would be no point in buing those little gas tube brushes huh?

No. In fact, they can do more harm than good.

nobs11
11-01-2008, 2:31 PM
It is a lot more likely that you will end up lodging something in the gas tube like lube that hardens, or cleaner, a piece from one of those brushes or whatever. Don't ram anything up the gas tube. Leave the gas tube alone.

The only thing that needs to be cleaned is the BCG, chamber and barrel. All done in 10-15 min. All this ARs need a ton of maintenance stuff is self serving BS propagated by the GP people.