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View Full Version : do most advocate depriming on a single stage prior to using a progressive reloader?


mtenenhaus
01-03-2017, 11:52 AM
wondering how most advocate the reloading sequence. is it best to deprime cases first on a single stage, then cleaning/polishing the cases...and then transferring to a progressive reloader.

i have a close friend who advocates this and he prefers to prime the cases by hand.

would love to gain further insight.

i would like to develop a system that would work for both .45 pistol as well as for accuracy / long range rifle shooting.

thanks

MrElectric03
01-03-2017, 12:32 PM
For handgun brass- I deprime on my xl650 using a universal decap die. Then wet tumble and store the clean brass until I'm ready to load it. It will be primed during the loading process on a progressive press either 650 or 1050 depending on caliber.

For rifle brass- .223, .308, and .30-06 get deprimed, sized, and trimmed on my 650 then wet tumbled and stored like handgun. .223 gets loaded on the 1050, .308 and .30-06 get loaded single stage and primed using a hand primer. All other rifle brass gets deprimed and sized single stage then wet tumbled and are loaded just like .308 and .30-06.

I see no reason to hand prime or even single stage prime handgun brass. One reason I really like the prime setup on the 650 is you can feel it prime and if it doesn't have any resistance you can chuck the case. I pay more attention to rifle brass. The good thing about single stage priming is you get to inspect the cases closer. You just have to decide if that makes sense for you or not. For me it really doesn't.

9mmepiphany
01-03-2017, 1:03 PM
i would like to develop a system that would work for both .45 pistol as well as for accuracy / long range rifle shooting.

Really two completely different processes

For handguns: I clean the brass without depriming and then deprime and resize before putting them away until needed. I do this on a single stage, but have done it on my progressive as well. The theory is that resizing is the most stressful step on the press and linkage

I prefer to load in a separate process as eliminating the resizing step usually allows more consistent seating depth.

For rifles: most folks clean the cases twice.

First they deprime, using an universal depriming die before tumbling the cases. Then they clean the cases, before lubing, resizing and trimming.

You'll then have to clean the lube off the cases before loading

RandyD
01-03-2017, 1:05 PM
You can reload brass without polishing it, so I am not advocating using the process. However, I like to process my pistol brass in stages where I deprime, resize and tumble in stainless steel media, and then store the brass for reloading. With rifle brass, I also trim to length, debur and chamfer the case mouth and I uniform the primer pocket, and debur the primer flash hole and then store the brass for reloading.

dwalker
01-03-2017, 1:34 PM
For pistol brass I just tumble then run it through the press.

mtenenhaus
01-03-2017, 2:14 PM
really interesting, thank you. i really appreciate the information.

i believe that my friend cleans and resizes the primer pockets during the first stage of the process.

i was also somewhat concerned about running used (not yet cleaned) cases through the reloading dies.

tonyjr
01-03-2017, 3:19 PM
I deprime while watching TV . [ Put an old towel on lap . ]
After all are deprimed , Then clean flash hole and primer pocket
Then tumble , vibrate , or sonic [ depending on pistol - size - or rifle ]
Then I kind of inspect and reprime .
I don't want any " stuff " left in cases .
Some people just take brass and reload .
YOU have to decide how much work you want to do / how clean your
brass is .
I deprime and prime off press .
A few reasons - broken deprimer pins , I want clean flash holes and primer pockets , I had to many problems with the Lee primer set-up [ fliped , stuck
and bent primers .
I also want a die to do one job . I use all 5 holes on loadmaster
1 expand case
2 powder drop
3 seat bullet
4 OAL
5 crimp if needed
Most other people will use from 2 to 4 dies . Maybe 1% use 5 dies[ probably less use 5 .
Since they don't sell 5 die sets , you would have to buy at least 2 sets .
Ask anyone who reloads how many depriming pins the have broken - hint - they sell in packs of 3 .
There is no right answer - just how much work you want to do .
Stuff builds up in the primer pocket and flash hole . It also builds up in the crease at the base of shell .
Believe me clean brass is better than shinny brass .
While I have 2 single stage presses one hand and the other mountable , they are / were used just for teaching nephews / nieces how to reload .
I deprime with a frankford , reprime with a Lee [ the one that uses a paper type primer holder ] and the press is a Lee load master .

Bigtwin
01-03-2017, 5:47 PM
For me personally I do case prep and then store the brass for when I am ready to reload.
That means tumble, size, ream primer pockets as needed, trim as needed. Then store until needed.

Divernhunter
01-03-2017, 6:04 PM
The pistol cartridges I load on my Dillon 650(9mm and 45ACP) I just tumble then run them thru the machine. No pre-decap and do not worry about cleaning the primer pockets.
All other pistol and rifle brass are hand primed.
All rifle rounds are loaded on 2 single stage RCBS units. 1st tumble brass. The rock chucker is for sizing rifle brass. Then tumbled to get off the lube. Then hand primed. Bullet seating is done on a Jr press since it has more feel.
All pistol brass other than 9mm/45ACP get sized and bullet seated on the Jr press.
I have a separate press for my 50BMG and do not have a hand primer seater for it.
I always prefer to hand prime.

Dragginpanda
01-03-2017, 8:33 PM
I usually prewash the brass in a bucket to get the chunks of dirt off. After, I stainless. Next, I deprime. Finally, I'll tumble to get the primer pockets cleaner.

Everything after that is in batches; priming, charging.....

simba
01-03-2017, 9:00 PM
Pistol caliber, first I remove the old primer on single stage, clean brass with soap and water for 10 minutes aftet that sun/air dry and finally store for when ready to reload.

tanks
01-03-2017, 9:14 PM
I load too many rounds of handgun ammo to do it on a single stage. I use the progressive reloader as intended. Dump cases into case feeder and then de=prime and resize as designed in station 1.

'ol shooter
01-03-2017, 9:38 PM
I deprime with a Harvey Tool, so I can sit in front of the TV while I do it. It goes really quick once you get the hang of it. I added guides to mine so the brass slips right into place without "fishing" around.
This is the tool:
http://i1188.photobucket.com/albums/z418/olshooter/harvey1_zps183efa5f.jpg
The guides are for the RCBS flash hole de-burring tool, shaft diameter is identical. I filed the guides a little so the brass would slip on and off more easily.:
http://i1188.photobucket.com/albums/z418/olshooter/harvey2_zps83d6618c.jpg
http://i1188.photobucket.com/albums/z418/olshooter/harvey3_zps9561ada6.jpg

diveRN
01-03-2017, 9:46 PM
Range pistol ammo gets tumbled in walnut/NuFinish for 1-2 hours, separated from the media, then into the case feeder hopper and deprimed at station 1 of the 650. I don't bother with case lube. For .223 range ammo: If it's my own brass that I shot, I tumble for 3 hours, separate the media and then it goes into the hopper and then deprimed on station 1 of the 650. .223 is the only rifle round I progressively reload.

If I'm working rifle brass that I didn't shoot or what I'm loading isn't range fodder, it gets deprimed on a single stage with a universal decapping die before a wet wash with SS pins. This way I can inspect it a little more closely. But again, I only do this with rifle brass.

mtenenhaus
01-04-2017, 1:56 AM
wow, thank you all... learned a lot

kcstott
01-04-2017, 3:18 AM
I treat all brass the same. and i do shoot long range F class.

Brass is brought home and cleaned, walnut then corn cob, No stainless wet tumble BS I don't have time for that crap. Then it goes to be trimmed and chamfered if needed, or to reload. and yes lube has to be used on rifle brass and it has to be cleaned off before use.

wbunning
01-04-2017, 7:11 AM
I have a cheapie Lee s/s press with a universal decapping die that is a permanent de-capping station. I de-prime my brass when I get back from shooting and store until I have enough to clean. I do that because it gives me an opportunity to give the cases a quick check, and I want my primer pockets cleaned in the wet tumbler. I have kind of lost faith in my progressive due to too much variation in seating consistency., and lately I'm using it mostly to prep pistol brass: size, prime and expand. I can run 500 cases through fairly quickly, and it does fine with that. Then I do the rest of the work with a single stage. But, I have lots of time to do it that way.

mjmagee67
01-04-2017, 8:09 AM
I can not for the life of me figure out why you would want to deprime pistol rounds on a single stage to reload on a progressive. It defeats the whole purpose of a progressive. During the summer I'll shoot several 1000 rounds a months. I would rather shoot than reload.

I also wonder about those who question the quality of ammo from their progressive. If you have to do some tasks on single stages because you think your progressive isn't up to the task, then you have the wrong progressive or unrealistic expectations. I use a Dillon 550 for loading bulk 223 varmint ammo. The press regularly produces ammo capable of .5 inch 5 shot groups at 100 yards. Which is just fine for squirrel busting at 200 to 400 yards with my bolt gun.

My pistol reloading process.

1. Tumble in 50/50 corn and walnut plus polish for 1-24 hours.
2. Try to sort out crappy stepped brass and Geco brass.
3. Lube lightly with One-Shot
4. Reload on Dillon 1050 (9mm only) Dillon 550 all other calibers.
5. Case gauge
6. Shoot.
Repeat as necessary.

tonyjr
01-04-2017, 9:29 AM
Depriming off press is mainly for cleaning primer pockets and flash holes .
In my case , my auto priming on press sucks - they got stuck , bent and some were up side down
Every time you handle a case , you have a better chance of finding a split
case or base .
Doing everything at once -how can you tell if you have a loose primer pocket ?
Is it faster to stop process because you have a broken decapper pin ?

I can bet if you take the least 5or next 5 posts , no one does it the same .

Most of you put gas in your car and stand there until full . I check my oil , water , walk around and look at tires . I start the car in garage , turn each blinker on , head lights and brake lights while car is warming up . [ I hate fix it tickets ]

kalapa
01-04-2017, 10:32 AM
For pistol I tumble in walnut first, then EVERY operation is done on the progressive press. I don't bother to deprime or resize first, and I have carbide dies so no lube either.

For rifle I lube the fresh range brass and just run it through the resizing/depriming die without cleaning. I don't like spending time cleaning and drying twice. I do this on a cheap $30 single stage Lee press. For this operation it's a lot quicker and easier on the single stage, plus (like someone else said) it saves the progressive press from wear on the linkage. After resizing/depriming on the single stage it gets cleaned in walnut then run through the progressive. I take the die out of station number 1 (it's still in the single stage) and run em just like the pistol. I still load brass on station 1 and pull the handle. It doesn't run through a die but I do still prime on the down stroke.

tanks
01-04-2017, 12:11 PM
...

My pistol reloading process.

1. Buy shiny, clean brass in lots of 10K
2. Lube lightly with One-Shot
3. Reload on Dillon 650 (40 S&W only) Dillon 550 all other calibers.
4. Case gauge while watching Netflix.
5. Shoot.
Repeat as necessary.

Modified for my process ;)

mtenenhaus
01-04-2017, 7:18 PM
Brilliant!!!!!!

Marshal Sixgun
01-08-2017, 1:57 PM
I second the notions already expressed about depriming pistol brass first. I couldn't imaging doing that but I shoot good volumes. I, however, roll size. So my process is:

Sort Brass
Tumble Brass with some polish. When I like the way it looks, separate the brass and media.
Roll Size - This gives me a chance to also look at my brass, ensure there really are no 380s in with the nine, etc. Splits can be caught.
Then store.
When ready, give it a shot of hornady spray case lube.
Dump into the progressive.
Every 100 rounds check powder charge/refill the primers, and put a round into a chamber gauge. Empty bin into homer bucket.
Then repeat.
For competition ammo, each round goes through a chamber gauge. Otherwise, I shoot it. No additional wiping or cleaning.

JMP
01-08-2017, 5:38 PM
I deprime with a sizing die; that's what the decapper is there for.

hambam105
01-09-2017, 1:13 AM
Dirty brass with dirty flash-holes does not get close to the assembly work area.

bruss01
01-09-2017, 5:50 AM
Ideally it should not be necessary but there are instances where it is a good move.

I obtained a very good price on 3k range brass... I believe it came from a LEO peactice/training facility. I had HUGE problems with this stuff. Some had crimped primers, some had sealed pri ers, maybe some had both. This led to herky-jerky operation of the press instead of a smooth, consistent flow, and many jams. Some new primers never got seated, leading to powder everywhere. It was such a mess, I had to call it quits, back up and de-prime on the single stage, then swage the primer pockets to try to get some consistency. I'm going to manually prime ghem and THEN run them through the progressive. I expect that to go a lot smoother.

LynnJr
01-09-2017, 7:00 AM
The only reason for a progressive press is to speed things up.
That said if your not using it for every step sell it and buy a single stage.

tonyjr
01-09-2017, 8:36 AM
LynnJr
I agree , but I deprime , clean flash hole and primer pockets . Then into vibrator / sonic / tumbler - then reprime .
You may have been lucky enough to never had crimped primers, sealed primers , broken the extractor rod or poked a hole in a primer .
I think anything over 10 cases on a single stage is dangerous .
Static electricity [ I think ] set off a couple of primers .
I was doing a test batch and just filled a case when phone rang , got up - when I came back , I grabbed the case - the powder ignited - scared me .
Bent primer , upside down and stuck primers -
I grounded bench and press and started depriming , cleaning flash hole and primer pockets by hand .

wpod
01-09-2017, 9:08 AM
New to reloading here, 3-4,000 rounds reloaded this first year into reloading.
My sequence is:
- Tumble/polish (inspect)
- Decap (inspect)
- Trim and clean primer pocket (inspect)
- Then resize, prime, powder, bullet, seat, crimp (inspect) all at once.
This is on my turret press.
Since this is all done out in the garage, I do everything but the loading when it's hot or cold out there. So by end of summer I'll have a pile of brass ready for loading during the comfortable fall temperature.
The downside is lack of time. As a truck driver, after work each day the garage could be 2,000 miles away. After work I'm still at work. I could Decap and trim in the truck but it's drive/sleep/repeat 5 days straight.

Sent from my SM-N910V using Tapatalk

JagerDog
01-09-2017, 9:38 AM
Pistol: I just clean it (walnut for me), then off to the progressive.

Rifle: I clean it and batch process on the T7. Sized and decapped in one operation unless it's crimped, then universal decapping die.

arrowshooter
01-09-2017, 12:43 PM
I do everything on a single stage to the same end as everyone else, but I just added a new step for stained range pickups.

I just got my hands on some military 9mm brass that was initially stored when damp and were "discolored". They weren't corroded, but dark and 4 hours in the walnut only lightened them up a touch. Now there is nothing wrong with dark/stained brass that is clean, but I did some research and found that vinegar can be used to remove the discoloration. So I soaked a test batch for two minutes in straight vinegar, rinsed in water with a touch of bleach to deactivate the acid, then rinsed again in clear water and put in the oven to dry. Next was an hour in the walnut/Nu Finish and they look like new on the outside and what I usually see on the inside.

dwalker
01-09-2017, 1:39 PM
So for .308, 6.5CM, and 300WSM I load on the single stage press, and I spend a lot of time on case prep.
That process is:
Tumble
Decap/resize- I full length resize .308 and 6.5CM that is used in the gas guns but neck resize 300WSM and bolt gun ammo
Uniform primer pocket
Debur flash hole
Trim to length and chamfer/deburr at the same time
Prime by hand, I would do this on the press but the on-press prime system on my 0-frame Pacific is antique and slow.
Charge using the iSD Smartreloader dispenser/scale
Seat bullet
I normally load these in lots of 50 to 100

5.56 "long range"ammo process is:

Sort by headstamp
Tumble
Lube
Decap/resize
trim/chamfer/debur
deburr flashhole
decrimp/uniform primer pocket
seat primer by hand
charge with the iSD
Seat bullet

Blaster 55gr 5.56-
Tumble
lube
load into casefeeder on the progressive- either the Pro1K or Loadmaster
Decap/resize
prime on press
charge using auto-drum
seat bullet

9mm
Tumble
load into casefeeder
run on progessive
shoot
repeat.

The thing thats important is either building accuracy or speed, and its one or the other. Really the only time I prime off press is when I am using a single stage for accuracy. Cleaning primer pockets etc I have also stopped doing. I used to wet tumble but it was just another step that did nothing to enhance accuracy or loading speed.

LynnJr
01-09-2017, 2:29 PM
LynnJr
I agree , but I deprime , clean flash hole and primer pockets . Then into vibrator / sonic / tumbler - then reprime .
You may have been lucky enough to never had crimped primers, sealed primers , broken the extractor rod or poked a hole in a primer .
I think anything over 10 cases on a single stage is dangerous .
Static electricity [ I think ] set off a couple of primers .
I was doing a test batch and just filled a case when phone rang , got up - when I came back , I grabbed the case - the powder ignited - scared me .
Bent primer , upside down and stuck primers -
I grounded bench and press and started depriming , cleaning flash hole and primer pockets by hand .

Anything over 10 cases on a single stage is dangerous?
Please explain that to me.

tonyjr
01-09-2017, 2:54 PM
The more cases that have powder in them and no bullet - something could set them off .
I assume you don't close the powder bottle after every case is loaded - leaving a tray of shells with powder in them while you get the bullets , change dies - answer the phone , door - etc .
Even sneezing can contaminate the powder .
Vary seldom do I load on the single stage - last time was for plated bullets , and before that was the powder coated .

dwalker
01-09-2017, 3:02 PM
The more cases that have powder in them and no bullet - something could set them off .
I assume you don't close the powder bottle after every case is loaded - leaving a tray of shells with powder in them while you get the bullets , change dies - answer the phone , door - etc .
Even sneezing can contaminate the powder .
Vary seldom do I load on the single stage - last time was for plated bullets , and before that was the powder coated .

I once charged a batch of 50 300BLK with powder that ended up sitting for at least 6 weeks until I got around to seating bullets. They shot just like all the rest...

at_liberty
01-09-2017, 3:21 PM
wondering how most advocate the reloading sequence. is it best to deprime cases first on a single stage, then cleaning/polishing the cases...and then transferring to a progressive reloader.

i have a close friend who advocates this and he prefers to prime the cases by hand.

would love to gain further insight.

i would like to develop a system that would work for both .45 pistol as well as for accuracy / long range rifle shooting.

thanks
What can make rifle so different is if you are not loading your own brass. That and the need to lube cases before resizing. Otherwise there is mostly common ground in how one can choose to load both straight wall handgun and necked rifle rounds.

For revolvers, you might want to periodically trim your brass to get uniform crimps. For rounds like 45 ACP using a minimal taper crimp that is not pertinent.

Those with a precision rifle mindset, accustomed to a single stage, tend to over think or obsess over the process of loading basic handgun.cartridges. Then there are those with priming systems that don't work very well and they get used to doing it by hand as a preliminary.

tonyjr
01-09-2017, 3:22 PM
That is the point - maybe I am to safety aware or just to busy .
My reloading presses are on a work bench - not a reloading bench until
I / we reload
I insist that when powder holder is full , the top goes back on bottle
and bottle is moved back to shelf . At reloading time [ 8 others besides
myself ] There is generally a table set up for cleaning the guns - someone
sorts thru media for cases , someone set up for their caliber . All have
asked why we do it this way - I explain what could happen - it probably
won't but could . Very small chance - but so is wining the lottery but you
still buy a ticket . If you feel safe - more power to you .

LynnJr
01-09-2017, 4:03 PM
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=572499&d=1484010212The more cases that have powder in them and no bullet - something could set them off .
I assume you don't close the powder bottle after every case is loaded - leaving a tray of shells with powder in them while you get the bullets , change dies - answer the phone , door - etc .
Even sneezing can contaminate the powder .
Vary seldom do I load on the single stage - last time was for plated bullets , and before that was the powder coated .

I usually load several hundred 50 BMG rounds at a time each with 240 grains of RE50 and never had an issue. That's around 8-10 pounds of exposed powder at a time.

Dragginpanda
01-09-2017, 4:19 PM
I deprime a couple hundred pistol cases at a time.

First, is a wash. After that, I run them thru a progressive. Finally, I clean out the press and hope I don't drop them little bastards everywhere.

TOM_ONE
01-09-2017, 5:10 PM
Pistol brass? I clean with primer in, lube, and throw them in my progessive press. Just training ammo anyway.

Rifle ammo, a bit different. Clean with primer in, then deprime. Size, chamfer, deburr, and swage after that. I then clean the primer pocket. After that, I load. I do not use a progressive press for rifle, I use my lee classic turret press.

Actually more enjoyable to reload rifle ammo...lol

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk

at_liberty
01-10-2017, 1:29 AM
For reloading 223 Rem, I use my case feeder whenever possible. First is just with the universal decapping die on brass that did not come from my rifle, so I can have clean primer pockets that are uniformed and brass completely prepped after resizing. I don't handle dirty brass, so first thing in the door is a cursory tumble in walnut shell and dryer sheet media. The cases will get tumbled seriously later after resizing.

For sizing I have been using One Shot so that I can use the case feeder to drive the resizing operation, the only die on the press at that phase. I have shimmed the arbor on my LnL AP, so it is stable yet able to rotate freely.

If you are preparing brass that were your reloads, caught from your rifle, then it should be practical to combine decapping and neck sizing prior to tumbling. In the case of the less messy One Shot, and when neck sizing only, you could go directly on to trimming, doing the tumbling/polishing after through with handling each case, thereafter run though the case feeder.

In rifles that are not pistol calibers I only have 30-30 Winchester and 223 Remington/5.56 NATO. I am equipped to do 30-30 on my turret as more of a single stage, precision approach. That is to say that I didn't buy the 30-30 shell plate for the progressive, foregoing use of the case feeder for a cartridge not likely to be loaded in volume.

tonyjr
01-10-2017, 7:25 AM
Anybody see the news about the flea market outside Mexico City [ I don't remember the town name ] ? The last time the fire works went off / fire was about 10-12 years ago
O H well enough said .

LynnJr
01-10-2017, 7:27 AM
Anybody see the news about the flea market outside Mexico City [ I don't remember the town name ] ? The last time the fire works went off / fire was about 10-12 years ago
O H well enough said .

No never heard about it do you have a link. Is it about priming brass?

tonyjr
01-10-2017, 8:01 AM
No , it was a fireworks flea market . It is the biggest fireworks market in Mexico - it was before Christmas
It only takes one mistake or weird thing .
I have had 2 primers go off - one in tray and one in the chute .
I figured it was static electricity and regrounded everything and decided to just reprime off press . I was already depriming off press . This was maybe 20 years ago .

dwalker
01-10-2017, 11:44 AM
No , it was a fireworks flea market . It is the biggest fireworks market in Mexico - it was before Christmas
It only takes one mistake or weird thing .
I have had 2 primers go off - one in tray and one in the chute .
I figured it was static electricity and regrounded everything and decided to just reprime off press . I was already depriming off press . This was maybe 20 years ago .

In 25 years of reloading I have had exactly 1 primer go off anywhere near the press, and it was halfway on purpose and I was trying something stupid to see if it would go off. I have literally crushed, torn, and sheared primers in half and not had them go off. I have even pressed out LIVE! GASP! primers that have been pressed in upside down. No bang. Not even a poof. Static electricity will not set off primer compound, nor will crushing pressure. Just impact. The primer cup really has to hit that compound pretty squared up too, or it wont go off, just ask anyone who has set the primers a tick high and had the click-no bang happen in competition.

LynnJr
01-10-2017, 3:01 PM
The only primers i have ever had go off were in a vacuum cleaner after spilling them in deep carpet. About 200 spilled and one went bang out of all of them being vacuumed up.
I don't advocate drinking alcohol while reloading or smoking while making fireworks.

PatC415
01-10-2017, 3:14 PM
wondering how most advocate the reloading sequence.

i have a close friend who advocates this and he prefers to prime the cases by hand.

1.) toss the brass into tumbler, deprime/resize, store clean brass in bags.
2.) hand prime a batch so I can "feel" the primer pockets.
Since I tend to load my practice ammo on the "hot" side, to match SD ammo, and see a few loose pockets, then toss the brass.
3.) Flare/charge, seat/crimp, done.

When it's rainy, like this week, I end up with LOTS of nice, shiny primed cases!

tonyjr
01-10-2017, 3:57 PM
dwalker
I have been reloading since 1972 . Back then I was told the 1st thing was powder n next was bullet and don't worry about the primers .
I started out with a Lee hand loader for the 270 then the 45 and when a pig got up I got the 50 AE . I ws buying whatever primers were on sale
You need a reloading press - after thinking about it I went back but the only one they had in stock was a return load master .
I don't know what caused the primers to go off . At that time I was told CCI was the best . This was by guys that were buying them at the store . I switched and now - maybe 30 years later it is still the only brand I buy .

LynnJr
01-10-2017, 4:50 PM
dwalker
I have been reloading since 1972 . Back then I was told the 1st thing was powder n next was bullet and don't worry about the primers .
I started out with a Lee hand loader for the 270 then the 45 and when a pig got up I got the 50 AE . I ws buying whatever primers were on sale
You need a reloading press - after thinking about it I went back but the only one they had in stock was a return load master .
I don't know what caused the primers to go off . At that time I was told CCI was the best . This was by guys that were buying them at the store . I switched and now - maybe 30 years later it is still the only brand I buy .

The 50 AE came out around 1988 didn't it?

Calguns77
01-10-2017, 6:13 PM
I treat all brass the same. and i do shoot long range F class.

Brass is brought home and cleaned, walnut then corn cob, No stainless wet tumble BS I don't have time for that crap. Then it goes to be trimmed and chamfered if needed, or to reload. and yes lube has to be used on rifle brass and it has to be cleaned off before use.

You tumble twice with different media, but SS tumbling is bs that takes too long? Taking your brass from the tumbler to the dryer takes the same amount of time as taking it from 1 tumbler to another. The only real difference is you have to deprime before wet tumblin, but you get the bonus of clean primer pockets.

TKM
01-10-2017, 6:25 PM
Ditto Tom One. That Tony dude,, not so much.

I now have a goal for reloading 50bmg. Most I've ever done at one time was 200.

dwalker
01-10-2017, 7:28 PM
dwalker
I have been reloading since 1972 . Back then I was told the 1st thing was powder n next was bullet and don't worry about the primers .
I started out with a Lee hand loader for the 270 then the 45 and when a pig got up I got the 50 AE . I ws buying whatever primers were on sale
You need a reloading press - after thinking about it I went back but the only one they had in stock was a return load master .
I don't know what caused the primers to go off . At that time I was told CCI was the best . This was by guys that were buying them at the store . I switched and now - maybe 30 years later it is still the only brand I buy .


I really have no idea what your trying to say.

tanks
01-11-2017, 4:01 AM
The only primers i have ever had go off were in a vacuum cleaner after spilling them in deep carpet. About 200 spilled and one went bang out of all of them being vacuumed up....fireworks.

I bought a shop vacuum just because of that possibility.

tonyjr
01-11-2017, 8:06 AM
LynnJr -- I bought my 50 ae in 1990
dwalker -- cheap primers bent , , I have poked holes thru them trying to decap

Carcassonne
01-11-2017, 9:49 AM
wondering how most advocate the reloading sequence. is it best to deprime cases first on a single stage, then cleaning/polishing the cases...and then transferring to a progressive reloader.

i have a close friend who advocates this and he prefers to prime the cases by hand.

would love to gain further insight.

i would like to develop a system that would work for both .45 pistol as well as for accuracy / long range rifle shooting.

thanks

I just spend 2 days depriming 10,000+ pieces of brass on a progressive. It would have taken longer if I did it on a single stage.


.

dwalker
01-11-2017, 9:58 AM
LynnJr -- I bought my 50 ae in 1990
dwalker -- cheap primers bent , , I have poked holes thru them trying to decap

I have used CCI, not bad stuff really. But I use far more Winchester, Fiocchi, and Wolf primers. Never and issue, but I do not use a mickey mouse handloader.

tonyjr
01-11-2017, 10:10 AM
Fiocchi, and Wolf primers are not sold where we go [ hunting / fishing - reeds , target masters and a few other places ] or not in stock . I have seen them at gun shows , but without knowing how good they are or their numbers - I stick with CCI .
Winchester - I think was one brand that bent on me .

Calguns77
01-11-2017, 11:44 AM
Fiocchi, and Wolf primers are not sold where we go [ hunting / fishing - reeds , target masters and a few other places ] or not in stock . I have seen them at gun shows , but without knowing how good they are or their numbers - I stick with CCI .
Winchester - I think was one brand that bent on me .

For the amount you reload you should really be buying in bulk online. Try PowderValley. Might want to bookmark Cabelas also, they just had a great sale on S&B primers.

and when a pig got up I got the 50 AE

What does this mean?

Dago Red
01-11-2017, 12:09 PM
I load too many rounds of handgun ammo to do it on a single stage. I use the progressive reloader as intended. Dump cases into case feeder and then de=prime and resize as designed in station 1.

What he said. If you have lots of free time and nothing to do go ahead and preprocess. With modern powders, primers and a good machine not cleaning the primer pocket isn't going to hurt you.

Red

tonyjr
01-11-2017, 12:28 PM
I was using 270 - back up was a 45 . After hitting with the 45 it still got up .
I was looking at the 44 mags and they showed me the AE It was big and heavy
Yes It cost more , and by the time you put the holster and extra magazine - it was twice as much
I don't like the hazmat fees - and there are 8 relatives that reload here . They generally buy their own bullets , primers and powder . But it gets mixed up .
I would rather open a one pound bottle than a 4 pound one . When bullets are on sale I do buy . I just got 500 - 308s today in mail .

packnrat
01-11-2017, 6:41 PM
i de-prime all of my brass on a single stage. for a number of reasons.
but load all my pistol and some rifle on a progressive. (volume)
my better stuff i load up on a single stage for a couple of reasons.
(better control, and numbers loaded up).

yes i do a couple extra steps. but that is just me.
some pop out old and load up.
others are anal about squeaky clean.
some very picky about loading's and bullet weight. (down to the millionth of a grain).

JMP
01-12-2017, 9:20 PM
If you are worried about a primer going off, wear safety glasses. If a primer goes off, it isn't that big a deal as long as you don't keep stashes of gasoline around your press.

at_liberty
01-13-2017, 4:37 AM
Really two completely different processes

For handguns: I clean the brass without depriming and then deprime and resize before putting them away until needed. I do this on a single stage, but have done it on my progressive as well. The theory is that resizing is the most stressful step on the press and linkage

I prefer to load in a separate process as eliminating the resizing step usually allows more consistent seating depth.

For rifles: most folks clean the cases twice.

First they deprime, using an universal depriming die before tumbling the cases. Then they clean the cases, before lubing, resizing and trimming.

You'll then have to clean the lube off the cases before loading

I shimmed my LnL AP arbor so the shellplate no longer rocks. It took only .005 thickness. My subplate is not exactly like the original, so others might need different adjustments.

tonyjr
01-13-2017, 9:16 AM
When one primer when off , it took the top off the primer tray . The other one went off in the chute - destroyed it .
I insist face shields are worn when reloading and cleaning guns

Calguns77
01-13-2017, 11:19 PM
When one primer when off , it took the top off the primer tray . The other one went off in the chute - destroyed it .
I insist face shields are worn when reloading and cleaning guns

You mean an actual face shield like this?

https://m.lowes.com/pd/3M-Professional-Face-Shield/3082689

tonyjr
01-14-2017, 1:42 PM
Yes , It not only stops you from wiping your eyes but stops coughing and sneezing from getting into powder or on guns when cleaning .
We also wear latex gloves
Too much BS - right ? tell me that when you get gun oil / solvent in your eye or sneeze into your cases .
We also wear them when at range - ever had a hot case hit your face ?

dwalker
01-14-2017, 2:15 PM
Yes , It not only stops you from wiping your eyes but stops coughing and sneezing from getting into powder or on guns when cleaning .
We also wear latex gloves
Too much BS - right ? tell me that when you get gun oil / solvent in your eye or sneeze into your cases .
We also wear them when at range - ever had a hot case hit your face ?

I had case separation in my 22mag "10/22" not long ago where hot powder blew back in my face. Stung a bit but nothing to cry about. Dug out the remnants of the case, cleaned the action on the line, went back to shooting.

Has never occurred to me to bring my welding equipment to the range with me.

Calguns77
01-14-2017, 3:04 PM
Yes , It not only stops you from wiping your eyes but stops coughing and sneezing from getting into powder or on guns when cleaning .
We also wear latex gloves
Too much BS - right ? tell me that when you get gun oil / solvent in your eye or sneeze into your cases .
We also wear them when at range - ever had a hot case hit your face ?

I wear some 3m safety glasses when usings solvents and when reloading. I've had solvents in my eyes.

I also wear glasses at the range and i've had hot brass in the face.

Feel free to wear whatever you like at the range and when reloading. I Can't say I've ever heard of somone wearing a facemask to the range. That's a first.


Edit: Do you have any issues with the facemasks fogging up while shooting?

tonyjr
01-14-2017, 4:46 PM
dwalker
I had case separation in my 22mag "10/22" -
This is something I kind of sweat / worry about in moist weather . I want the crease between the base of shell and wall clean . I don't want a carbon build up and moisture creating acid / alkali - eating thru case .
I have had / seen small cracks in the 25 ACP , 357 and 270 [ This was in snowing conditions - I though I died enough - but who knows .

Calguns77
01-14-2017, 5:22 PM
dwalker
I had case separation in my 22mag "10/22" -
This is something I kind of sweat / worry about in moist weather . I want the crease between the base of shell and wall clean . I don't want a carbon build up and moisture creating acid / alkali - eating thru case .
I have had / seen small cracks in the 25 ACP , 357 and 270 [ This was in snowing conditions - I though I died enough - but who knows .

Is that possible?

If your worried about excess moisture in the air getting into your case, have you considered investing in a dehumidifier for your reloading room?

tonyjr
01-14-2017, 6:26 PM
It is not in the reloading area . When in snow or rain - hunting - now at range .
I don't know how much water in air / humidity / dew it would take .
I prefer to error on the safe side .
I have seen quit a build up in cases - then I got a sonic - The pins in tumbler were not cleaning enough .
I am not worried about the cases [ they are cheap ] - just me / others and the guns

dwalker
01-14-2017, 6:35 PM
I gues I am happy I bought all weather guns and ammo

tonyjr
01-15-2017, 8:11 AM
In 'NAM we put rubbers on the barrels - they kept leaves , bugs and rain out .
Here in CA you have to carry guns in locked cases , so open range is main danger - dew / heavy fog .

Chief-7700
01-15-2017, 9:37 AM
Load in mags, Shoot, pickup, tumble clean, lube and toss into casefeeder, reload, tumble lube off, put into .45ACP 100 round boxes, load into mags. The cycle is always the same.
Chief