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hitman13
10-05-2008, 4:01 AM
Building blow out bags for our trucks. Let me know what else you think I should have that I havent thought about yet, as I know there is more that I need but dont want to goto my room and tear apart my personal one.

EMT shears
Israeli Bandages
Celox / Qwik clot sponges
Hemo strips
Guaze rolls
4x4 guaze
iodine
superglue
sam splints
watergel
pressure dressings,
gloves
IV bags
IV starters
Med tape
Butterflys
regular and large bandaids.

PatriotnMore
10-05-2008, 4:31 AM
Hemostats
Forceps
tourniquet S/F
1 6" ACE
1 4" ACE
1 6" self-adhering ACE
1 4" self-adhering ACE
Asherman chest seal
Duct Tape
Chem Lights

hitman13
10-05-2008, 10:12 AM
I cant believe that I forgot some of those. Time to go sleep...

Thanks Patriot!

docsmileyface
10-05-2008, 12:22 PM
14 ga 3 1/2" needles, hyfin dressings, large tegaderms work for occlusive dressings as well as petroleum gauze, get rid of the pressure dressings redundant if you've got the Israeli's, see if you can get an abdominal pad or dressing, a buttload of 3" tape and most of all CAT tourniquets.

EOD3
10-05-2008, 4:09 PM
Tampons

docsmileyface
10-05-2008, 7:56 PM
Tampons

From what I've been told, a lot of tampons contain an anti-coagulant which keeps blood flowing, and that packing a wound with kerlex is more effective.

EOD3
10-05-2008, 8:35 PM
Learn something new every day...

I'll check the first-aid kit.

11Z50
10-05-2008, 9:29 PM
Kerlix works for many tasks. A couple Israeli dressings and rolls of kerlix can take care of most issues. Some betadine is handy as well. Latex gloves are essential.

One of the biggest problems I have always had with aid kits (and other types of kits) is I tend to put waaaay too much stuff in them. I carried an IV bag around for years in my aid kit thinking I might need it.

My current kit is small, simple and contains items that will get me or my buddy to a medic or hospital.

docsmileyface
10-06-2008, 7:07 AM
Kerlix works for many tasks. A couple Israeli dressings and rolls of kerlix can take care of most issues. Some betadine is handy as well. Latex gloves are essential.

One of the biggest problems I have always had with aid kits (and other types of kits) is I tend to put waaaay too much stuff in them. I carried an IV bag around for years in my aid kit thinking I might need it.

My current kit is small, simple and contains items that will get me or my buddy to a medic or hospital.

Roger that top.... if your going to carry anything related to IV's, a simple saline lock kit should be sufficient, and all you really need for that is a constricting band (or rubber glove in a pinch), an alcohol pad (or not in a pinch), an 18 ga catheter, and a saline lock and a piece of tape.

For some reason the Army has a crazy hardon for IV's, but if fluid resuscitation is used in the wrong instance that added fluid volume is going to blow the clots the wounds been forming when the BP rises from the added volume, then you've got to recontrol the bleeding again.

Just initiating a saline lock gives you vein access in case of later vasoconstriction when they really NEED the fluids, or if you need to push meds and the components needed are incredibly smaller then a whole IV kit with tubing and bag. Not to say don't carry any fluids if you've got room for it, but in general, carrying saline lock kits on each person and having the medic responsible for who gets fluids and when is a lot easier and effective.

Wolfpack331
10-06-2008, 1:18 PM
CAT tourniquets! I always have one on my vest and at least one in my bag.
Chitosan is good stuff to have as well but hard to get . I like it better than quikclot.
Giving an IV in a tactical setting sucks and under fire is even worse, +1 on the saline lock. I'm know some of you are medics Im not, only CLS(Ranger Version), but i've seen enough that they should make me an honorary one.
Hooyah. Anyone notice how cool it got all of a sudden?

docsmileyface
10-06-2008, 3:06 PM
The flashbang pouches they issue with the MOLLE FLC set work great for CAT tourniquet pouches, trying to get it SOP for everyone to have to carry it opposite of their IFAK so they got a CAT on either side, I carry a total of 7 on my person + 2 in my aid bag.

If you like chitosan you'll love celox, its like a powdered form of hemcon, the guys on the board got my group a whole bunch.

11Z50
10-06-2008, 7:03 PM
[QUOTE=docsmileyface;1590974]For some reason the Army has a crazy hardon for IV's, but if fluid resuscitation is used in the wrong instance that added fluid volume is going to blow the clots the wounds been forming when the BP rises from the added volume, then you've got to recontrol the bleeding again./QUOTE]

I was not a medic, but a CLS for years in the army. Only once did I do an IV in the field, and that was more precautionary than necessary. Even then the medics were there in minutes, and the medevac arrived in about 30 minutes. The biggest thing I think I can do until the medics or other EMT-types arrive is stop the bleeding and maintain an airway. Both tasks don't require much gear.

The main purpose for an aid kit for me now is to take care of myself or a buddy if injured. minor wounds, fractures, cuts, burns and scrapes happen all the time, and while they don't require a trip to the ER, they do warrant some immediate treatment. In any serious aid kit I would recommend a good supply of stuff for tending to minor injuries.

docsmileyface
10-07-2008, 7:00 AM
I was not a medic, but a CLS for years in the army. Only once did I do an IV in the field, and that was more precautionary than necessary. Even then the medics were there in minutes, and the medevac arrived in about 30 minutes. The biggest thing I think I can do until the medics or other EMT-types arrive is stop the bleeding and maintain an airway. Both tasks don't require much gear.



Roger that, the basics work - nowadays the preferred treatment is slapping on a tourniquet and not letting it go until the guy gets back to the rear. Airway is a bit trickier, because chances are if someone needs one right there on the battlefield and a head-tilt-chin-lift doesn't work, he's going to need something pretty high-speed like a surgical cric.

They make pre-packaged sealed cric kits just for that purpose, takes about 2-3 minutes to pop through that cartilage and shove a tube down their throat. Not exactly the kind of thing you want to be doing under effective fire, but definitely a tool to think about having in a blow-out bag.