PDA

View Full Version : Here's a crazy random idea that doesn't really even help California folks


deadcoyote
08-19-2016, 1:19 PM
A few years back I got to shoot a Taurus Judge at my wife's family reunion out of state. It was fun for a cheap blaster but seemed kinda pointless as the rifling they're required to have to avoid SBS laws spins the shot and it scatters as soon as it exits the bore. Also, I will add I would not want a Taurus made gun but S&W makes their own competitor now, which I would trust a bit more.

So, I am also a huge dork, and read constantly. I was reading something about old Swedish gun laws stating that at one point the Swede's had a law on the books demanding that all guns used for hunting have rifled bores. this publication was explaining that you can still find many old Swede shotguns on the used market with "Straight rifling" so they could be in compliance with this law and still be used for bird hunting, as it didn't scatter the shot like traditional rifling. Why couldn't you do this to a modern .410 revolver in order to be compliant with the rifling requirement and have it actually work?

I know shotguns with revolving cylinders are banned in CA period, so this doesn't help, just a random thought.

sigfan91
08-19-2016, 2:10 PM
Because the Judge needs to spin a 45LC round to stabilize it.

ArkinDomino
08-19-2016, 2:27 PM
LoL

IVC
08-19-2016, 3:12 PM
I'm not sure about this "rifling" thing.

The way to get a Judge was to set up a trust and go the AOW route (I believe), where the LGS would add a forward grip to trigger the correct classification prior to transferring it to the trust (you). I also believe that the forward grip could be removed after the transfer so the gun would end up in its original configuration.

I obviously haven't done it (otherwise I'd know the details), but I've seen a few at O.C. Armory and I do remember that the process was very long due to the wait periods to get some paperwork that was required in the process.

IVC
08-19-2016, 3:16 PM
this publication was explaining that you can still find many old Swede shotguns on the used market with "Straight rifling" so they could be in compliance with this law and still be used for bird hunting, as it didn't scatter the shot like traditional rifling. Why couldn't you do this to a modern .410 revolver in order to be compliant with the rifling requirement and have it actually work?

If you are thinking about manufacturers building a gun with straight rifling in order to get the revolver on the CA roster (avoid the SBS statute), it won't work.

What triggers the law is whether you can fire a .410 shell from it, not what the inside of the barrel looks like.

deadcoyote
08-19-2016, 3:51 PM
I was coming at this simply from an outside CA perspective. You could make a .410 revolver that would actually work past 7 feet with shot shells and not have it be a SBS with the straight rifling.

floogy
08-19-2016, 4:31 PM
Maybe not in the Judge/Governor platform since they are designed for 45lc and proprietary buckshot loads.

I think it would be cool for a pump action or double barrel .410 "firearm" with a short barrel that is straight rifled. I guess it would depend on how the ATF defines "rifling". I guess even the slightest twist rate could make it "rifled" and thus not a "shotgun".

Stupid NFA and CA laws.

IVC
08-20-2016, 1:00 PM
...and not have it be a SBS with the straight rifling.

Rifling is not the problem. The ability to fire a shot shell is.