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One Shot, One Dropped
09-11-2008, 11:02 PM
Is it a bad idea to dry cycle (load a mag, and keep cranking the carrying handle back to make it cycle/eject rounds) a bad idea? Is it okay in moderation? Or, does it really not matter?

Is it normal for the bullet to get linear scratches on it when doing this? (Is that just the bullet getting marked up from the feed-ramps?)

And, is it bad if it still leaves a small imprint where the firing pin would strike it when you just dry cycle it like this?

Any input would rock!

LewDog
09-11-2008, 11:11 PM
I don't feel any harm would be done to the gun. I'm just wondering why you would be cycling live rounds, especially if you're doing this at home. Slamfires do happen pretty often (big indicator of the possibility is the firing pin marks on the primer). If I were you, I'd refrain from doing that unless you're using blanks or snap caps.

domokun
09-11-2008, 11:13 PM
Is it a bad idea to dry cycle (load a mag, and keep cranking the carrying handle back to make it cycle/eject rounds) a bad idea? Is it okay in moderation? Or, does it really not matter?

It's fine. I do that with function checking dummy rounds after I take it apart for cleaning. No issues with mine yet. I'd rather have a bit more wear on my gun knowing that it functions properly than having it malfunction while I'm at the range.

Is it normal for the bullet to get linear scratches on it when doing this? (Is that just the bullet getting marked up from the feed-ramps?)

It's just the magazine lips or the feed ramp scratching the bullet. If you really want to do this frequently get some function check dummies from Brownells or reload some bullets into casings without powder and primer in them and mark them accordingly so you don't get them mixed up with your live ammo.

And, is it bad if it still leaves a small imprint where the firing pin would strike it when you just dry cycle it like this?

Once again, for safety reasons I don't do this with live ammo. NDs are bad for your kharma. ;)

Any input would rock!

See inline reply in bold.

One Shot, One Dropped
09-11-2008, 11:13 PM
I have some dummy rounds. I'll use those from now on. I do keep it pointed out the door, though (and I live in the hills).

What about the scratches on the bullet? No big deal?

One Shot, One Dropped
09-11-2008, 11:13 PM
See inline reply in bold.

Thanks domokun!

Glin1216
09-11-2008, 11:14 PM
I wouldn't continuously load and unload the same round. Because of the design of the weapon, the primer has pressure applied to it each time you chamber it. Do this enough times and you will definitely see a negligent discharge.

rayra
09-12-2008, 12:43 AM
First question, why would you be doing such an odd thing.

Second question, well more of an observation - You might wind up having a problem with bullet setback and high chamber pressures if you make a habit of doing this, to the point where the bullets are driven backward into the cartridge from repeatedly being driven into the feed ramps.

And lastly, if you carry over this bad habit to other weapons using SP bullets, you'll be repeatedly deforming the tip of the bullets and wondering why your long range accuracy sucks.

So if you are doing this sort of behaviour just because you find it entertaining, KNOCK IT OFF.
And as mentioned, you keep screwing around with chambering live ammo when you aren't on a firing line, you WILL have a Negligent Discharge.

Lateralus
09-12-2008, 12:49 AM
Scratches on the bullet are usually a result of the violence involved from stripping it out of the mag, up the ramps, and into battery.

The little dents happen all the time, which is a good reason not to use live rounds. Slam fires are VERY RARE, but I would never do that.

About the scratches, thats why I use a bobsled in my match AR. You would be surprised how much they alter trajectory....

aplinker
09-12-2008, 12:54 AM
not to be mean, but this is very foolish behavior. NDs and slam fires happen. Even if it goes in a safe direction your ears will be damaged.

Snap caps or just stop.

odysseus
09-12-2008, 12:56 AM
First question, why would you be doing such an odd thing.

Second question, well more of an observation - You might wind up having a problem with bullet setback and high chamber pressures if you make a habit of doing this, to the point where the bullets are driven backward into the cartridge from repeatedly being driven into the feed ramps.

And lastly, if you carry over this bad habit to other weapons using SP bullets, you'll be repeatedly deforming the tip of the bullets and wondering why your long range accuracy sucks.

So if you are doing this sort of behaviour just because you find it entertaining, KNOCK IT OFF.
And as mentioned, you keep screwing around with chambering live ammo when you aren't on a firing line, you WILL have a Negligent Discharge.

What he said.

No reason to do this unless you mean it. Get or make yourself some dumb rounds.

.

The Cable Guy
09-12-2008, 12:58 AM
Not considered dry anything when chambering live rounds. I used to do that rarely with my shotgun, then I realized how dangerous it was and stopped.

Josh3239
09-12-2008, 1:00 AM
I must admit, yesterday I was having problems with my AR at the range and took it home and took it out to find out the problem. Turned out the mag I was using was seated to low which was causing jams and to protect myself from a discharge I removed the firing pin, I only did it a couple of times to make sure only the mag I was using was indeed sitting too low. And it was.

One Shot, One Dropped
09-12-2008, 6:34 AM
First question, why would you be doing such an odd thing.

Second question, well more of an observation - You might wind up having a problem with bullet setback and high chamber pressures if you make a habit of doing this, to the point where the bullets are driven backward into the cartridge from repeatedly being driven into the feed ramps.

And lastly, if you carry over this bad habit to other weapons using SP bullets, you'll be repeatedly deforming the tip of the bullets and wondering why your long range accuracy sucks.

So if you are doing this sort of behaviour just because you find it entertaining, KNOCK IT OFF.
And as mentioned, you keep screwing around with chambering live ammo when you aren't on a firing line, you WILL have a Negligent Discharge.

It was to check if this new ammo I bought would chamber correctly. It's mixed head stamp so different amounts of the canellure show on a couple of the cases.

This is NOT something I usually do, but I wanted to make sure it would chamber easily. So, I pulled out 10 rounds and ran it through twice...

wikidklown
09-12-2008, 8:05 AM
Hey bro, I don't have dummy rounds so I've used live ammo to dry cycle after a build but I remove the firing pin from the bolt(AK or AR) before I dry cycle it. All I need are 2 or 3 rounds and I'm happy but I won't advice you to keep on dry cycling with live ammo if you have dummy rounds(use them instead)

As for your the shells being scratched, is the mag new? My new mags does that in the beginning but goes away after break in so unless there is a problem with your mag not setting in correctly in the magwell it may go away after break in.

Hope that helps.

ar15barrels
09-12-2008, 9:22 AM
I must admit, yesterday I was having problems with my AR at the range and took it home and took it out to find out the problem. Turned out the mag I was using was seated to low which was causing jams and to protect myself from a discharge I removed the firing pin, I only did it a couple of times to make sure only the mag I was using was indeed sitting too low. And it was.

The AR needs the firing pin installed to retain the cam pin correctly.
If you want to cycle live rounds safely, you need to buy an extra firing pin and grind 1/16" off the tip.

ar15barrels
09-12-2008, 9:22 AM
I must admit, yesterday I was having problems with my AR at the range and took it home and took it out to find out the problem. Turned out the mag I was using was seated to low which was causing jams and to protect myself from a discharge I removed the firing pin, I only did it a couple of times to make sure only the mag I was using was indeed sitting too low. And it was.

The AR needs the firing pin installed to retain the cam pin correctly.
If you want to cycle live rounds safely, you need to buy an extra firing pin and grind 1/16" off the tip.

ar15barrels
09-12-2008, 9:23 AM
I must admit, yesterday I was having problems with my AR at the range and took it home and took it out to find out the problem. Turned out the mag I was using was seated to low which was causing jams and to protect myself from a discharge I removed the firing pin, I only did it a couple of times to make sure only the mag I was using was indeed sitting too low. And it was.

The AR needs the firing pin installed to retain the cam pin correctly.
If you want to cycle live rounds safely, you need to buy an extra firing pin and grind 1/16" off the tip.

ar15barrels
09-12-2008, 9:24 AM
I must admit, yesterday I was having problems with my AR at the range and took it home and took it out to find out the problem. Turned out the mag I was using was seated to low which was causing jams and to protect myself from a discharge I removed the firing pin, I only did it a couple of times to make sure only the mag I was using was indeed sitting too low. And it was.

The AR needs the firing pin installed to retain the cam pin correctly.
If you want to cycle live rounds safely, you need to buy an extra firing pin and grind 1/16" off the tip.

ar15barrels
09-12-2008, 9:24 AM
There's a hiccup in the matrix...

One Shot, One Dropped
09-12-2008, 9:26 AM
Thanks guys! I think I'm off to the range to make sure...

Josh3239
09-12-2008, 12:53 PM
The AR needs the firing pin installed to retain the cam pin correctly.
If you want to cycle live rounds safely, you need to buy an extra firing pin and grind 1/16" off the tip.

Hmm, I think I'll have to do that. Thanks Randall.