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View Full Version : Benefits to Volentary Registration of Long Arms


leitung
08-18-2008, 7:30 PM
So, would any of you register you long guns with the DOJ? Is there any benefit to doing so. I don't wanna put on the tin foil hat here, but I don't think I want the DOJ knowing what guns I have if I don't have to register them. But if they get stolen, I want them to be attached to my name, so I could hopefully get them back.

What say you, should I do it or not?

bwiese
08-18-2008, 7:32 PM
Helpful for lost/stolen recovery.

There may be a particular happy technical benefit to voluntary registration of some rifles with DOJ.
It's being further analyzed and will be posted here on CGN when we know a bit more. ...

bohoki
08-18-2008, 7:34 PM
i would register my rifles is i was allowed to attach a silencer

or assault features since i did register some long arms back near 2000

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sorensen440
08-18-2008, 8:04 PM
just have your name engraved

yellowfin
08-18-2008, 8:07 PM
I for one do not wish to encourage them to seek any form of consolations from me whatsoever. The closer they can get to non-existance as far as I'm concerned the better.

C.G.
08-18-2008, 8:33 PM
First step - registration.
Second plausible step - confiscation; if they are not registered it makes it a lot more difficult.

elSquid
08-18-2008, 8:38 PM
Helpful for lost/stolen recovery.

There may be a particular happy technical benefit to voluntary registration of some rifles with DOJ.
It's being further analyzed and will be posted here on CGN when we know a bit more. ...

So if an officer gives you grief over your OLL and refuses to read the flowchart, you can say to him "Look, it's registered. Call it in and check."

-- Michael

Bruce
08-18-2008, 8:43 PM
Benefits to Volentary Registration of Long Arms ?

It would make it easier for them to write the search warrants when they decide on total disarmament. Is that the kind of benefit you had in mind? :TFH:

elSquid
08-18-2008, 8:47 PM
So if an officer gives you grief over your OLL and refuses to read the flowchart, you can say to him "Look, it's registered. Call it in and check."

Now that I think about it, that would be a nice security blanket for Saiga owners.

-- Michael

yellowfin
08-18-2008, 8:54 PM
Now that I think about it, that would be a nice security blanket for Saiga owners.

-- Michael
And just as much of an illusion of security. They'll just have another thing they can ignore just like they ignore the 2nd and 14th Amendments, individual property rights, etc.

nobs11
08-18-2008, 9:01 PM
How would I register an OLL? i.e. just an unbuilt lower, not a complete rifle? On the form it says barrel length, etc. Thanks.

Meplat
08-18-2008, 9:13 PM
Recovering lost or stolen guns through registration is a pipe dream. No agency I know of puts any priority on it at all. Every gun I have ever DROSed still comes back as belonging to me even though I have filed the requisite reports of stolen firearms. If one is ever used in a crime they are going to come looking for me so I have to be careful not to lose the original police report of stolen guns. I see absolutely no advantage to registration. :chris:




Helpful for lost/stolen recovery.

There may be a particular technical benefit to voluntary registration of some rifles with DOJ. It's being further analyzed and will be posted here on CGN when we know a bit more. ...

elSquid
08-18-2008, 10:18 PM
And just as much of an illusion of security. They'll just have another thing they can ignore just like they ignore the 2nd and 14th Amendments, individual property rights, etc.

Registration of OLLs doesn't help in the "confiscation" scenario.

It may help when interacting with local LEOs/DAs who aren't up to speed on the law.

Instead of trying to educate a LEO by showing the flowchart, discussing the implications of Harrott, SB23, etc the first point a person could bring up is that the firearm in question is legally registered. And that the officer can easily check on this. Obviously the DOJ would not allow one to (illegally?) register a real, named AW via this mechanism, so it stands to reason that the rifle - from a maker and model standpoint - is legal.

If the officer presses the point, one could then show how the firearm complies with SB23.

I don't know what kind of receipt that the DOJ sends upon successful registration, but I assume that this too could be part of the paperwork that one could present to a dubious LEO.

Of course, this wouldn't be necessary if the DOJ actually did their job and updated the so-called "assault weapons identification guide". But that's a different rant.

-- Michael

yellowfin
08-18-2008, 11:34 PM
Again, you're assuming they'll play by the rules. They don't. They decide which ones they like and don't like...otherwise lots of us, myself included, would UOC right now for instance. You can be right but if certain people don't like it, they can be as wrong as they like but you lose unless you sue your way through it. Basically you have no rights until at least a cop car ride and at worst $10k+ later.

A signed piece of paper means nothing to those who make up the rules as they go along. And until we retake the state, they do.

bwiese
08-18-2008, 11:39 PM
Yellowfin, please stop the drama.

This may have practical realworld effects for OLL folks.

rayra
08-19-2008, 12:13 AM
So, would any of you register you long guns with the DOJ? Is there any benefit to doing so. I don't wanna put on the tin foil hat here, but I don't think I want the DOJ knowing what guns I have if I don't have to register them. But if they get stolen, I want them to be attached to my name, so I could hopefully get them back.

What say you, should I do it or not?

I see no reason to volunteer firearms information to CA DOJ authoritarians.
They'll get attached to your name by filing a theft report with their serial number, should that become necessary.

elSquid
08-19-2008, 12:55 AM
Again, you're assuming they'll play by the rules. They don't. They decide which ones they like and don't like...otherwise lots of us, myself included, would UOC right now for instance. You can be right but if certain people don't like it, they can be as wrong as they like but you lose unless you sue your way through it. Basically you have no rights until at least a cop car ride and at worst $10k+ later.

A signed piece of paper means nothing to those who make up the rules as they go along. And until we retake the state, they do.

That's not an argument against voluntary registration of OLLs; it's an argument against taking a legal OLL to the range at all.

-- Michael

katphood
08-19-2008, 9:14 AM
A couple of thoughts:

1. Make sure your will or living trust lists your firearms w/ make, model, serial number, and any improvements. It's a good document to have if you should kick off but also a great place to list all of one's possessions.

2. Wouldn't it be just as good if not better to make sure your firearms are insured?

Or do insurers ask if you also have it registered?

Maybe there's an insurance co. out there that is 2nd Amend. friendly and would appreciate the business.

WolfMansDad
08-19-2008, 9:33 AM
I don't see any benefit in registration. If your property is stolen, you will submit a police report with serial numbers anyway. What good does it do you for the state to keep a list of what you've got on the off chance it gets stolen someday? I am perfectly capable of keeping an inventory of my own possessions, thank you. I don't need those in power who have openly expressed their views on the subject having a list of what they wish I didn't own.

No, registration has only one purpose, and that is a prelude to confiscation. Not only would I not voluntarily register anything if it was optional, I would love to see the mandatory handgun registration law eliminated.

bohoki
08-19-2008, 9:44 AM
so i guess the benefit to voluntary rifle registration is

that you may register some and have some not registered

WhoDat
08-19-2008, 9:49 AM
A notepad and Microsoft Excel are your friends. Inventory everything with Make, Model, Description, Accessories, Serial #, and approximate worth. Email it to yourself, so you'll have a record wherever you are and even if your house burns down.

Having all these numbers on record will not only probably serve the same theft-recovery benefit as registering your weapons, it'll probably help the insurance recovery a great deal.

Digital pics may also help.

nobody_special
08-19-2008, 9:57 AM
There may be a particular happy technical benefit to voluntary registration of some rifles with DOJ.
It's being further analyzed and will be posted here on CGN when we know a bit more. ...

I'd be very interested in that. Frankly, I have difficulty seeing any possible benefit from any sort of registration.

Sniper3142
08-19-2008, 12:52 PM
Voluntary???

Nope.

I did however register my semi auto rifles that suddenly became Assault Weapons back in 1999. That was only so I could continue to use them in public.

nicki
08-19-2008, 2:41 PM
Only if it came with some real benefits.

Most non gun owners by the way don't equate registration with confiscation, their view is we register cars, why not guns.

Of course cars aren't used to defend yourself from oppressive governments, guns are, but that is a view most have not been shown.

Some examples:

Full replacement of stolen gun
Mandatory return of stolen guns, get to keep replacement also.
Enhanced penalty for possession of stolen registered gun.

Is trully Voluntary.

nobs11
08-19-2008, 3:57 PM
If the government truly wants to confiscate your guns, it is not hard to go through every FFL's bound book and come knocking at your door. Every FFL that is no longer in business has to send their bound book entries to the ATF. Lets get real here and get rid of that tin foil hat.