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View Full Version : Calgun member passed,family needs advice on his guns


Davis
08-18-2008, 9:07 AM
A fellow Calgunner ..Walzy age 28 , passed away yesterday from a sudden illness
He has quite a collection of firearms.His parents and wife need some info on how they proceed with transferring and splitting up his collection.

Any info would be helpful.
Thanks

USN CHIEF
08-18-2008, 9:09 AM
Man sorry to hear that he passed away, my prayers will go to him and his family.

Do the parents and wife want to get rid of the guns or keep them?

FEDUPWBS
08-18-2008, 9:11 AM
PM sent

bwiese
08-18-2008, 9:14 AM
I am sorry for your loss.
Looks like FedupwBs is getting in touch, but feel free to PM me if any questions.

yellowfin
08-18-2008, 9:17 AM
Keep all of them in the family to keep the tradition going. Destroying your heritage isn't worth any amount of money.

sorensen440
08-18-2008, 9:24 AM
sorry to hear about your loss
Are they looking to keep or sell?

RRangel
08-18-2008, 9:35 AM
My condolences to his family. I know it's hard. Maybe you can convince them to be more specific, or even post what aspects about those firearms they have questions with.

CCWFacts
08-18-2008, 10:26 AM
I have a somewhat similar situation coming up. Not a death, but a friend's father is moving into assisted living and he asked me (the one person he knows he trusts to do this) to handle his father's extensive collection.

I'm going to make a detailed catalog with photos and serial numbers of the whole thing, to record everything. Then I'll evaluate them as best I can, and see what the selling options are.

I expect there will be some good pieces in there, and also some pieces of no particular value.

I've told my friend that he and his brother should pick out 2-3 pieces each that are going to have value for them for all their lives, and that they can leave to their children.

Then, the others need to be liquidating for cash. It's necessary.

Any suggestions on this?

My sub-question: I assume he's going to have a bunch of < $100 value pieces. It's not worth the money for DROS and shipping and hassle to even deal with these at all. What to do with them?

Fantasma
08-18-2008, 10:27 AM
If he has a son, give them to him. If the son is young tell the mom to keep them and give them to the son when he is older. Thats the best present a son can receive to remember his dad.

scottj
08-18-2008, 11:55 AM
"My sub-question: I assume he's going to have a bunch of < $100 value pieces. It's not worth the money for DROS and shipping and hassle to even deal with these at all. What to do with them?"

A friend of mine's neighbor wanted to get rid of some really old crappy revolvers and tail end of WWII pre-CZ-52. Basically we went to a Cow Palace gun show and he was able to sell most of them to dealers with no paper work. He got very little for some of the revolvers, maybe $25, and others he couldn't sell. I can't remember how much he sold the pre-CZ-52 for. I could never figure out how the dealers were planning on handling the lack of paper work.

Dirtbiker
08-18-2008, 12:05 PM
If most of his collection is C&R is shouldnt be much of a problem. Maybe someone in the family can run them through gunbroker or the like.

1911su16b870
08-18-2008, 12:06 PM
My condolences to you and Walzy's family. Its very difficult after a loved one leaves. Try to keep the firearms in the family by treating family members to a few range trips. Hopefully they'll enjoy the sport as much as Walzy did and he'ld like that. If the estate wants to cash out, list them in the for sale section with Walzy estate sale in the thread.

tiki
08-18-2008, 12:06 PM
Wait on the ones that aren't worth much for the next gun turn in. They can turn them all in one at a time for some Best Buy gift certificates. :)

Two Shots
08-18-2008, 12:06 PM
Codolences to you and the Family for this loss.

brassburnz
08-18-2008, 12:16 PM
Sorry to hear about Walzy. Hopefully the family will keep his collection intact. Although my kids are still young, they know which part of my collection has sentimental as well as monetary value. I guess it's never too early to start thinking about these things.

E Pluribus Unum
08-18-2008, 12:20 PM
Here is something to keep in mind.

If Walzy gifted the firearms to one of his children or his wife just before he died, then no firearms broker is required. A parent is allowed to give firearms to his children without a background check and without paying any fees or contacting the government in any way.

If he gave them to the children, but simply stored them at his residence, the government would have no record of this.. ;)

bwiese
08-18-2008, 12:24 PM
If Walzy gifted the firearms to one of his children or his wife just before he died, then no firearms broker is required. A parent is allowed to give firearms to his children without a background check and without paying any fees or contacting the government in any way.

Please don't spread misinformation: this is only partially true - for long guns.

Since early 1990s, handgun recipients for inheritance, intrafamily transfer etc must complete DOJ reg paperwork and send a $19 (?) fee.

CCWFacts
08-18-2008, 12:28 PM
Wait on the ones that aren't worth much for the next gun turn in. They can turn them all in one at a time for some Best Buy gift certificates. :)

Yeah, if I knew of a big gun turn-in that would be great to convert $50 junk into $150 gift certificates. But I don't know of one coming up.

Davis
08-18-2008, 1:18 PM
Thanks JeffM for your help.

As it stands right now, since he just passed yesterday, The family is tending to other arrangements.
Once that is over, they plan on opening the safe and go from there.
There are no children. I would figure that the family will keep some but I doubt the will keep all his toys.
I will inform his wife and parents on the info I have rec'd
Thanks to all for your kind words. He loved shooting IDPA and Steel Challenge here in Sacramento. He was a regular at the Gun Room in Elk Grove too.

If they wish to sell any of his stuff I will get the info out to all

Scott

BigDogatPlay
08-18-2008, 1:59 PM
28 years old... thats just wrong. People that young and in their prime should have no business dying. And it certainly gives pause to reflect on how fortunate we all are.

Please extend my condolences to the family and friends.

As a side note I've included instructions in our living trust and our wills on what happens to the contents of my safe once I'm gone. My wife enjoys firearms almost as much as I do, so she'll be okay and we're childless. A few pieces that were my dad's will get shipped to my oldest brother's son as rememberance of his grandfather.

The lesson we can all take away, if you don't have your papers in order now, they won't be if something happens to you unexpectedly.

Olav
08-18-2008, 2:07 PM
My condolences to you and Walzy's family.

Beelzy
08-18-2008, 2:09 PM
My sincere condolences to you and your family.

If the chap had his act squared away, there should be a sheet of loose paper
in the safe that should have the guns listed with their approximate values.
Everybody with brains and a safe has one. ;)

derek@thepackingrat.net
08-18-2008, 2:10 PM
28 years old... goodness...

I'm sorry to hear about this loss. My condolences to Walzy's friends and family...

rayra
08-18-2008, 3:36 PM
...My sub-question: I assume he's going to have a bunch of < $100 value pieces. It's not worth the money for DROS and shipping and hassle to even deal with these at all. What to do with them?

Turn them into a gun buyback program, the type that provide a $100 debit card in exchange.

rayra
08-18-2008, 3:38 PM
Please don't spread misinformation: this is only partially true - for long guns.

Since early 1990s, handgun recipients for inheritance, intrafamily transfer etc must complete DOJ reg paperwork and send a $19 (?) fee.

I believe it was 1996. The matter was of some importance in my case 5 years ago.

HowardW56
08-18-2008, 3:48 PM
A fellow Calgunner ..Walzy age 28 , passed away yesterday from a sudden illness
He has quite a collection of firearms and his parents and wife need some info on how they proceed.

Any info would be helpful

I'm sorry to hear about this....

28 is way too young. My kids are 27 & 29...

I feel bad for his family...

JeffM
08-18-2008, 7:32 PM
Thanks JeffM for your help.

As it stands right now, since he just passed yesterday, The family is tending to other arrangements.
Once that is over, they plan on opening the safe and go from there.
There are no children. I would figure that the family will keep some but I doubt the will keep all his toys.
I will inform his wife and parents on the info I have rec'd
Thanks to all for your kind words. He loved shooting IDPA and Steel Challenge here in Sacramento. He was a regular at the Gun Room in Elk Grove too.

If they wish to sell any of his stuff I will get the info out to all

Scott

RIP Walzy :(

You're welcome? (I think you might be referring to FEDUP though, as I'm quoted in his sig line)

Just make sure you pound into the family that most dealers are crooks looking to make a few (or more) bucks from their loss. They really need to do the research themselves or have a trusted friend (you?) do the leg work so they don't end up taking pennies on the dollar for the firearms. Granted, no one is going to work for free, but 75-80% is better than 25%.

If they're not interested in keeping them all (which is what I would do if one of my family members passed) I'd tell them to keep whatever has the most sentimental value, even if its just a $100 .22lr and an old shotgun that he hunted with, to pass on as heirlooms. And sell the rest as above.

N_S
08-18-2008, 8:59 PM
For the love of god don't get rid of the guns.

RossRinSD
08-23-2008, 11:18 PM
That really is a tough one for the family, when a person leaves us at such a young age. Best wishes for the whole for family.

Maybe they should take a bit of time before dealing with all the guns. I know when my grandfather passed away, my uncles all called dibs on all of his nicer rifles and shotguns. I ended up with a little .22 pistol. Turns out it was the gun he carried the most while out on the farm. He and I weren't all that close, but I still remember choking through his cigarette smoke while trying to eat cinnamon and sugar toast.

savageevo
08-24-2008, 8:18 AM
Im so sorry this had happen to one of us. It is always hard on the family in situations like this. Since he did not have any children, I am sure he would want to give his guns to family members that would love to keep them as he did. To keep his love alive, I recommend after the family member take what they want, to sell the remainder to the calguns family and all proceeds either go back to the family or the CG foundation. Rip brother.

BroncoBob
08-24-2008, 8:21 AM
Man, my family and I are extremely sorry for you loss and our prayers are with you.

tenpercentfirearms
08-24-2008, 8:23 AM
Who ever his best friend was, give them all to him. If he had a younger sibling or person who really looked up to him, he should get them.

If the money is an issue, then sell them on Calguns. Anyone, not just dealers are always looking for some killer deals. Put them on Calguns in the for sale section and remind everyone they are to help a widow and you will get fair prices on everything and they will be well taken care of.

But like guns mean much once you are gone and who really cares if they are taken care of. Really, guns are inconsequential when compared to life. Just more toys to occupy our time.

kurac
08-24-2008, 8:36 AM
Sorry to hear about the loss, I have been to many funerals and the ones of people who died before they should have are always the toughest to get through.

Regarding the collection. I have found that selling stuff on forums to be a good place to move unwanted items with mostly honest customers. If the family wants the most out of the deceased's hard work over the years then they will not want to take the whole collection to a gun shop. I shop at gun shops too but they need to keep their doors open which means they need to make a profit, its kind of a conflict of interest unless you sell everything on consignment in which case the house usually takes 20%. You will still need to research each item to make sure it is priced right. A general rule of thumb for me is that if it sells in less than a minute it was too cheap. If it takes a couple of days then it was priced right. Remember, you can start a little high and then make a price adjustment if required but you can't get away with going back and asking for more.

SVT-40
08-24-2008, 11:05 PM
Davis, I'm very sorry to hear of the loss of your friend. This topic was covered in some detail in the link below. The company I work for www.Gunslingerauctions.com is in Southern Calif, so probably not of much help to you, but If we can be of any service to you don't hesitate to call.

Good luck, and you are providing a very positive service to your friends family.

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=82480

tenpercentfirearms
08-25-2008, 4:57 AM
I just had an idea. If they want to sell them, pay a Calgunner to sell them. Payment can be in the form of a firearm. The family gets their pick, once that is done, the Calgunner can get their pick if they sell the firearms for x amount. Make sure they sell them on Calguns and stipulate that they must put in the for sale thread what the guns are for and that if the price seems too low, people can comment on it.

If I passed away I wouldn't mind seeing one of my guns going to a Calgunner who made sure my wife got as much as she could for them.

freakshow10mm
08-25-2008, 5:16 AM
28 is way too young. I'm 27.

PM on the way to the OP.

saki302
08-25-2008, 11:18 AM
Put the list here on calguns- anything that doesn't sell here, put on gunbroker.

They will get FAR more $$ than if offered to a dealer- and in gunbroker sales, shipping the gun themselves shouldn't be a problem.

-Dave