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rlewpolar
02-06-2016, 10:22 PM
Had my first IDPA introductory workshop today. Fun and learned a lot. Used my reloads and everything seemed all and good. Had a couple of misfeeds that I attributed to not seating the mag correctly after a couple of tactical reloads but apart from that, everything seemed to go well.

Finished the day and came home tonight. Started cleaning my gun and what do I find in the barrel?

A stuck bullet. A squib. Jammed in there. This really shook me up. Managed to get it out with a cleaning rod and a rubber mallet.

I am scared to think what would have happened if I had taken one more shot.

Not quite sure what to do now. I have about a thousand 9mm reloads. Break them all down?

I think I know what happened. I sometimes make dummy rounds without powder to test the bullet depth and somehow one of these may have gotten mixed in with the live rounds. I worry that there is another one of these out there.

Maybe I will just use them up during slow fire at the range and listen carefully for a weird sound. During an IDPA event, with the clock running, there is no way I would have heard it and no one else did either.

What puzzles me is that I finished the course of fire. So how did this one get lodged in there? Did I just get extremely lucky and this was the very last bullet? Weird. And freaky.


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Tok36
02-06-2016, 10:30 PM
You got very lucky. You can weigh the rounds if they are all using the same brass. While this is not fool proof for catching any and all sqibs in your case it may work in that you are looking for an entirely empty round that you made. I am always on my toes when i am shooting reloads. My first squib from range reloads took the barrel off my snubby.

Glad you found it.

Jet Setter
02-06-2016, 10:32 PM
Glad you are OK and the worst did not happen.

You need to be diligent about keeping your dummy rounds away from your real rounds. Mark them different or this will happen again. Better to be safe to shoot another day.

sealocan
02-06-2016, 10:33 PM
"I think I know what happened. I sometimes make dummy rounds without powder to test the bullet depth and somehow one of these may have..."

so are you saying you used live primers in these dummy rounds you made?

If so, I politely suggest that you don't do that again.

Black Majik
02-06-2016, 10:33 PM
Glad nothing bad came as a result. My advice would be, if you do use home made dummy round, do not prime the case.

Dropping the hammer on this will just result in a click.

Also, always mark your funny rounds so it's noticeably different than your loaded rounds.

Also it may be a good idea to just break down sunny rounds after measuring your seating depth.

rlewpolar
02-06-2016, 10:36 PM
"I think I know what happened. I sometimes make dummy rounds without powder to test the bullet depth and somehow one of these may have..."

so are you saying you used live primers in these dummy rounds you made?

If so, I politely suggest that you don't do that again.


Yes. Dumb. Lesson learned.


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JDMIS300
02-06-2016, 10:37 PM
I think I was there with you today at the clinic. What gun were you shooting? I remember people by their guns rather than their names sometimes. Haha.

Glad the worst didn't happen with that squib...

rlewpolar
02-06-2016, 10:39 PM
I think I was there with you today at the clinic. What gun were you shooting? I remember people by their guns rather than their names sometimes. Haha.

Glad the worst didn't happen with that squib...


Was shooting a Sig P229


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sealocan
02-06-2016, 10:41 PM
In that case if you learned from your mistake, thank you for telling us about it so that we can benefit as well.



Maybe you could jam a few of those soft yellow or orange foam air plugs into the cases of your dummy rounds (as well as additionally marking them with paint/ marker.) Not as good as professionally made snap caps but at least that firing pin would fall onto something soft.

claylakers
02-06-2016, 10:42 PM
:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: :thumbsup::thumbsup:Yes. Dumb. Lesson learned.


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rlewpolar
02-06-2016, 10:48 PM
Since this is my first squib, here's a question. With a live primer and no powder, is it possible that you would only hear a click? Or will you always get some sort of weird sounding pop? I really think I only heard clicks today but with my ear protection and under stress from the clock, it's possible I missed it.

But can a squib occur and you would only hear a click?


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Black Majik
02-06-2016, 10:51 PM
Since this is my first squib, here's a question. With a live primer and no powder, is it possible that you would only hear a click? Or will you always get some sort of weird sounding pop? I really think I only heard clicks today but with my ear protection and under stress from the clock, it's possible I missed it.

But can a squib occur and you would only hear a click?


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I had a squib on my Redhawk recently, it was a click instead of a pop and unburnt powder spilled from the cylinder. Definitely possible to just experience a click

rlewpolar
02-06-2016, 10:54 PM
I had a squib on my Redhawk recently, it was a click instead of a pop and unburnt powder spilled from the cylinder. Definitely possible to just experience a click


Thanks. That is good to know. I am paranoid now. Going to shoot up all my reloads. If I hear a click, I'm going to break down the gun and look through the barrel. I like my guns and I like my fingers even more.


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JTROKS
02-06-2016, 11:15 PM
You just got lucky that squib was your last shot. If you ended clearing that jam or was able to chamber another round it could've damage and/or hurt you.

My scariest squib was a 454 Casull on the day I decided to practice double action with full power loads. I leaned 2 lessons that day. Always use magnum primers with W296. When shooting at the range always stop and inspect the gun after a failure to fire especially big bore magnum revolvers.

spencerhut
02-07-2016, 6:13 AM
Weighing loaded 9/38/40/45 to try and sort out which ones have powder is usually an exercise in futility. The differences in bullet/case/powder weight rarely add up to enough to tell which ones are missing powder. You can try to find the 2 or 3 lightest rounds and pull those to check for powder. Sometimes you get lucky.
Otherwise pull them all or segregate and mark them "Practice only - watch for squibs"

trigger945
02-07-2016, 6:32 AM
Did you get lucky? Hell yeah, you did! The safest way is to break down all your ammo and redo. Don't take a chance, not worth it.

Stay safe OP.

JustEd
02-07-2016, 6:42 AM
Had my first IDPA introductory workshop today. Fun and learned a lot. Used my reloads and everything seemed all and good. Had a couple of misfeeds that I attributed to not seating the mag correctly after a couple of tactical reloads but apart from that, everything seemed to go well.

Finished the day and came home tonight. Started cleaning my gun and what do I find in the barrel?

A stuck bullet. A squib. Jammed in there. This really shook me up. Managed to get it out with a cleaning rod and a rubber mallet.

I am scared to think what would have happened if I had taken one more shot.

Not quite sure what to do now. I have about a thousand 9mm reloads. Break them all down?

I think I know what happened. I sometimes make dummy rounds without powder to test the bullet depth and somehow one of these may have gotten mixed in with the live rounds. I worry that there is another one of these out there.

Maybe I will just use them up during slow fire at the range and listen carefully for a weird sound. During an IDPA event, with the clock running, there is no way I would have heard it and no one else did either.

What puzzles me is that I finished the course of fire. So how did this one get lodged in there? Did I just get extremely lucky and this was the very last bullet? Weird. And freaky.


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In the future, if you make up a dummy round don't put a primer in it!!!

_Nick_
02-07-2016, 6:48 AM
Very new to reloading myself. Educating myself by reading and talking to a lot of guys locally. I have also made a few powderless rounds to measure the OAL, and they are separated from live rounds.

Until JustEd said it, I never thought of it, but I don't need primers in those rounds. That's knowledge I will take with me in the future.

I did buy the little hammer to remove the projectile, just haven't gotten around to it yet.

bwhited
02-07-2016, 7:21 AM
Did you check the barrel?
Is there a ring inside it?

heidad01
02-07-2016, 7:28 AM
Had my first IDPA introductory workshop today. Fun and learned a lot. Used my reloads and everything seemed all and good. Had a couple of misfeeds that I attributed to not seating the mag correctly after a couple of tactical reloads but apart from that, everything seemed to go well.

Finished the day and came home tonight. Started cleaning my gun and what do I find in the barrel?

A stuck bullet. A squib. Jammed in there. This really shook me up. Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

How did everything seem to go well???
You pulled the trigger and it went "Poooff", instead of "Bang" !!

Didn't you notice (at the range) that your last shot was a dud??:eek:

That part is the scariest to me. Don't worry about the rest of the ammo. squibs are easy to clear if you detect them after pulling the trigger.

mosin of nagareth
02-07-2016, 7:36 AM
You can use dummies for dry fire and reload practice, and for checking function.
So they have applications outside the reloading area.
Here are some more ideas:
Make dummies in nickle cases if you typically shoot brass--or vice versa.
Get some colored Sharpies and ink your dummy rounds.
Tiger stripes, various patterns, whatever.
Never prime dummy rounds.
Keep them in special containers-cigar box, girlfriend's discarded makeup bag, discarded girlfriend's makeup bag--just make sure it's somewhere separate from live rounds.
Always keep them in that place, nowhere else.
Keep the box away from areas where you keep live rounds, another room if possible.

bewguns
02-07-2016, 8:02 AM
There are two people that follow you as you're shooting, a range officer and the person holding the timer. You are all (hopefully) monitoring safety as you're shooting but I'd say it's primarily your responsibility. Even if you don't hear it, you can feel the difference. I've seen the RO and/or the timer save a couple of shooters. When the pistol went Pop instead of Boom they yelled STOP and the shooter was able to safely clear the lodged bullet and go back to shooting.
It's easy to get caught up in the excitement of shooting and pressure under time but safety should be first. The thrill would end quickly if you were to blow up your pistol.

rlewpolar
02-07-2016, 8:04 AM
Did you check the barrel?

Is there a ring inside it?


No, no ring in it. Barrel looks uniform and normal.

What does a ring signify? Barrel is toast?

Was worried about scratching or dinging the barrel when removing the squib. Tried to tap it out from breech to muzzle but it was stuck and right at the beginning of the breech end so went in from the muzzle side. Hated to do it and was careful about the crown. A couple of light taps it it popped right out.

Ok, another question. In case of a kaboom, would the squib destroy just the barrel or could it take the slide and frame as well?


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Carcassonne
02-07-2016, 9:04 AM
I had a squib also.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg.html)

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg.html)

gunprofit
02-07-2016, 10:02 AM
Squibs will not cycle the gun.

Squibs in semi-autos are not a problem. They won't extract, eject, and feed a new cartridge.

Squib in a revolver are a different story.

JTROKS
02-07-2016, 11:33 AM
I had a squib also.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg.html)

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg.html)

I remember clearing a squib like that from a customer's gun. The owner of the revolver tried to pull it out with pliers then heating it up. It was a mess that needed the barrel recrowned for he tried to punch the bullet to the rear and nicked the crown in several places.

MrOrange
02-07-2016, 12:10 PM
Yes. Dumb. Lesson learned.


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:thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup::thumbsup: :thumbsup::thumbsup:

lol that made me smile, too. How many people just up and admit things like that?



A ring/bulge in the barrel usually means it's done. I have read of folks continuing to use light loads with cast bullets in a minimally bulged barrels, but I don't think I'd want to.

It's interesting that you didn't realize the last round didn't fire, which should cause a shooter to stop and see what's wrong. Since a primer-only round doesn't cycle the slide, there's no chance of firing off a round behind it unless you charge the gun again. This is why you're supposed to observe the ejected round when clearing a dud: If it's a complete round, drive on, but if it's an empty case, then you need to stop and check for a stuck bullet. In a revolver, the bullet will tend to stop at the forcing cone, nicely locking up the gun and leaving you unable to unload any remaining live rounds, which adds a little spice to pounding out the stuck bullet.

I remember reading about some manufacturer's tests where they put serious threaded plugs in auto barrels just to test for failure, but I don't recall who did the tests. IIRC on some guns the slides bulged, some were undamaged, but none of them sent the slide flying back towards the shooter like in Sin City.

ke6guj
02-07-2016, 12:56 PM
Maybe I will just use them up during slow fire at the range and listen carefully for a weird sound. During an IDPA event, with the clock running, there is no way I would have heard it and no one else did either.


I've done some IDPA and seen some squibs happen. they always got caught before the next round went off. you'd hear a couple guys yelling "SQUIB!!".

I had a squib also.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg.html)

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg.html)

I also had a friend do that with a GP100. but he didn't realize it squibed and continued to shoot it. he even reloaded and continued to shoot until the the entire 6" barrel was full of bullets and the last bullet shot couldn't completely leave the cylinder and bridged the gap between the cylinder and forcing cone. it wasn't until he couldn't rotate the cylinder that he asked for help.

I think 8 projectiles were removed from the barrel:eek:

crazy thing is that the revolver took it like a champ. no barrel rings and it still shoots good.

Sunday
02-07-2016, 1:01 PM
Stuff happens that is why I suggest instead of buying 10 different guns buy the same and spare parts and you will be in good shape.

Chief-7700
02-07-2016, 2:10 PM
As a IDPA Primary Safety Officer (PSO) this one of the thing we always look out for are squibs, if the gun did not sound right we stop the person and check the gun for a squib.
Chief

gtarifa74
02-07-2016, 2:54 PM
Glad to hear nothing happened Op! It could've gone All Bad:turned:

ar15robert
02-07-2016, 4:24 PM
Any experienced reloader or shooter is gonna know a squib load. I had one before and knew right away turned out I let my Dillion sit for a while and had probs with powder dropper luckily I load all rounds from batch into one container and had one no biggie clear barrel then few rounds later another. Was gonna toss them all out but my uncle wanted to fire his so we shot the batch had 6 more out of the remaining 90. Shot them out slowly but pretty obvious when slide doesn't cycle.

floogy
02-07-2016, 5:52 PM
I've done some IDPA and seen some squibs happen. they always got caught before the next round went off. you'd hear a couple guys yelling "SQUIB!!".



I also had a friend do that with a GP100. but he didn't realize it squibed and continued to shoot it. he even reloaded and continued to shoot until the the entire 6" barrel was full of bullets and the last bullet shot couldn't completely leave the cylinder and bridged the gap between the cylinder and forcing cone. it wasn't until he couldn't rotate the cylinder that he asked for help.

I think 8 projectiles were removed from the barrel:eek:

crazy thing is that the revolver took it like a champ. no barrel rings and it still shoots good.

Wow. Guess that speaks volumes about Ruger revolvers. Was he shooting 38 or 357 at the time?

SonofWWIIDI
02-07-2016, 6:02 PM
Wow, you dodged a bullet there!

Glad you didn't get injured.

Please stop loading dummy rounds with a live primer, and I would put a mark on the dummy rounds.

http://www.hunt101.com/data/500/15767Picture_167-2.JPG
http://trull.org/~alex/media/pics/techy/squib-section.jpg

curtru
02-07-2016, 7:54 PM
I had a squib also.

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%202_zpsg2fnmqs8.jpg.html)

http://i1290.photobucket.com/albums/b536/carcassonne17/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg (http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/carcassonne17/media/44MAG%201_zpszl7kqa4d.jpg.html)
So close to making it out....

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JTROKS
02-07-2016, 11:01 PM
I shot steel with a revolver for a couple of years and it's hard to stop right after the squib load when the steel targets are big and you're going for that savage run.

spencerk
02-07-2016, 11:59 PM
I had a Glock 26 that squibed twice in the same week, then blew up in my hand 2 weeks later. Then a month later a Glock 22 blew up in my hand. Both with factory ammo, but the squib in the picture is from LAX ammo... When the g26 did this I should have taken a hint, it was during a private advanced training session with covered 6 at Angeles. Cut my training session in half...
http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f232/spencerkohl/null_zpsc6edf335.jpg (http://s48.photobucket.com/user/spencerkohl/media/null_zpsc6edf335.jpg.html)

Idk of I just have really bad luck or Glock had a small period of bad quality control, but when the g22 blew up in my hand and ripped it open, it turned me off from glocks and poly guns in general. I had a cz 75 that had a split case that ruptured the baarrel. I just had to replace most of the parts and smooth up the slide rails and fit a new barrel, but the gun worked like it did on day one. Sold it to a guy who actually knew about the ordeal. He said it was a selling point for him haha.

JTROKS
02-08-2016, 12:59 AM
With 3 decades of reloading I've had squibs and blown primers with reloads due to over pressure. I've had brass split by the case mouth and recently had 223 loads that had partial case mouth fragmenting. Knocking on wood, I haven't had a gun blow up on me.

You either have the worst luck or you shoot gazillion rounds increasing your chance to catch a bad factory round.

I had a Glock 26 that squibed twice in the same week, then blew up in my hand 2 weeks later. Then a month later a Glock 22 blew up in my hand. Both with factory ammo, but the squib in the picture is from LAX ammo... When the g26 did this I should have taken a hint, it was during a private advanced training session with covered 6 at Angeles. Cut my training session in half...
http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f232/spencerkohl/null_zpsc6edf335.jpg (http://s48.photobucket.com/user/spencerkohl/media/null_zpsc6edf335.jpg.html)

Idk of I just have really bad luck or Glock had a small period of bad quality control, but when the g22 blew up in my hand and ripped it open, it turned me off from glocks and poly guns in general. I had a cz 75 that had a split case that ruptured the baarrel. I just had to replace most of the parts and smooth up the slide rails and fit a new barrel, but the gun worked like it did on day one. Sold it to a guy who actually knew about the ordeal. He said it was a selling point for him haha.

Metal Magic
02-08-2016, 1:48 AM
I've done some IDPA and seen some squibs happen. they always got caught before the next round went off. you'd hear a couple guys yelling "SQUIB!!".



I also had a friend do that with a GP100. but he didn't realize it squibed and continued to shoot it. he even reloaded and continued to shoot until the the entire 6" barrel was full of bullets and the last bullet shot couldn't completely leave the cylinder and bridged the gap between the cylinder and forcing cone. it wasn't until he couldn't rotate the cylinder that he asked for help.

I think 8 projectiles were removed from the barrel:eek:

crazy thing is that the revolver took it like a champ. no barrel rings and it still shoots good.

Holy smokes that's a crazy story


And OP, glad it worked out in your favor.

pacmule
02-08-2016, 5:33 AM
When I make my own dummy rounds I drill a hole through the case sideways, makes them easily recognizable, no paint to wear off. Can also put a few drops is epoxy in the hole then stand on its nose to prevent setbacks

glock_this
02-08-2016, 6:37 AM
I had 2 in 1 day on an AR15 due to some crap underpowered reloads bought here in a buy years ago. I wear one around my neck now on a necklace I made :)

In my case I knew it was a squib both times as the follow up round got jammed into the back of the squib stopping the bolt from closing & thus round firing behind the squib of course as firing pin couldn't do it's job. The follow up round had the bullet jammed back into the case given the bolt slamming into the round.

Oh and it took the slightest of baby taps down the barrel with a brass rod to dislodge as neither was jammed in the barrel hard. Subsequent shooting with quality ammo proved the rifling was not damages thankfully.

tacos3
02-08-2016, 6:57 AM
I've seen and heard about a half a dozen squibs in shooting IDPA. All them made a noise that wasn't a "click" and wasn't a "boom" more like a "pop" or "Pfft". They all cycled the guns and all got caught by the SO or someone that yelled Squib.

I happens more often than it should and I've had one myself. You just have to have enough discipline to stop shooting when you hear someone yelling at you.

zman
02-08-2016, 7:11 AM
I had 2 in 1 day on an AR15 due to some crap underpowered reloads bought here in a buy years ago.

Was it from Freedom Munitions?

floogy
02-08-2016, 10:26 AM
I had 2 in 1 day on an AR15 due to some crap underpowered reloads bought here in a buy years ago. I wear one around my neck now on a necklace I made :)

In my case I knew it was a squib both times as the follow up round got jammed into the back of the squib stopping the bolt from closing & thus round firing behind the squib of course as firing pin couldn't do it's job. The follow up round had the bullet jammed back into the case given the bolt slamming into the round.

Oh and it took the slightest of baby taps down the barrel with a brass rod to dislodge as neither was jammed in the barrel hard. Subsequent shooting with quality ammo proved the rifling was not damages thankfully.


Scary. I too have some crap reloads I bought during the panic. Decent price but they blow unburned powder inside the action. Some fly by night operation that isn't even around any more. I'll have to keep that in the back of my head as I finish those off.

I can put more care into my own reloads.


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flyinverted
02-08-2016, 10:55 AM
I just shot some 9mm rounds I pressed in 2010. Had a squib in a Sig P6.
It went Pop like a cap gun and I saw a small puff of smoke come from the the ejection port in the slide.

Each time you pull the trigger you should have a constant recoil feel. In my opinion you should be able to shoot blindfolded and tell if the slide cycled 100%, if the slide cycled at all, if the slide is open. Likewise the different sound and lack of recoil on a squib round requires an immediate stop and inspection.

heidad01
02-08-2016, 11:13 AM
I just shot some 9mm rounds I pressed in 2010. Had a squib in a Sig P6.
It went Pop like a cap gun and I saw a small puff of smoke come from the the ejection port in the slide.

Each time you pull the trigger you should have a constant recoil feel. In my opinion you should be able to shoot blindfolded and tell if the slide cycled 100%, if the slide cycled at all, if the slide is open. Likewise the different sound and lack of recoil on a squib round requires an immediate stop and inspection.

I did not believe the story in the first post but said something nice. Especially the part about a nice day and tons of shooting with no problem. ;)
Any one, dead or alive, shooting a match event can tell a squib.

Eljay
02-08-2016, 11:39 AM
The point where it gets really tricky is if you have a light load - maybe the powder dropped half as much as it should have or whatever. Or maybe the powder somehow got contaminated and didn't all go off. It just kind of sounds... odd.

Anyway there's a couple of ways to approach the ammo you have. You can slow fire it and if you're not 100% sure of each shot just stick a squib rod down there. You can weigh every round and pull or take extra care with the 10 lightest. Or of course you can just pull everything although that's a lot of work.

hardcore4sure
02-08-2016, 12:10 PM
I had a Glock 26 that squibed twice in the same week, then blew up in my hand 2 weeks later. Then a month later a Glock 22 blew up in my hand. Both with factory ammo, but the squib in the picture is from LAX ammo... When the g26 did this I should have taken a hint, it was during a private advanced training session with covered 6 at Angeles. Cut my training session in half...
http://i48.photobucket.com/albums/f232/spencerkohl/null_zpsc6edf335.jpg (http://s48.photobucket.com/user/spencerkohl/media/null_zpsc6edf335.jpg.html)

Idk of I just have really bad luck or Glock had a small period of bad quality control, but when the g22 blew up in my hand and ripped it open, it turned me off from glocks and poly guns in general. I had a cz 75 that had a split case that ruptured the baarrel. I just had to replace most of the parts and smooth up the slide rails and fit a new barrel, but the gun worked like it did on day one. Sold it to a guy who actually knew about the ordeal. He said it was a selling point for him haha.

I had one from LAX too, in my Kahr CW9, luckily I wasn't shooting as fast as normal and noticed the shot didn't feel or sound right. Stopped to look, unloaded and was shocked to see ....no light coming thru the barrel ! Sheesh, no more LAX for me.

eigenstate
02-08-2016, 1:50 PM
I had this happen with my Glock 35 in the late 90's with some crap ammo I bought for cheap.

Was shooting with my wife and her friend from out of town. Her friend shot one round while I was watching and I actually saw the bullet fall out of the barrel and hit the ground about 10 ft downrange.

I helped her clear the resulting jam, and like an idiot, didn't pack it in for the day. It was a good thing I did see what happened, because it happened again, but this time left the bullet in the barrel. I was going to clear the jam, but didn't see the impact of the bullet, so had the thankfully wise (or lucky) idea to take the gun down and take a look, saving my gun, probably her hand, and quite likely my face.

I think I've only had a few malfunctions in all the years since then, but in every case, I've always checked the barrel, even if I was certain that the bullet went downrange.

I also had a dud in my j-frame once (just the click, but no bang), and didn't even think to let that sucker cool down before firing the next round and advancing the potential grenade to the next spot. That was with cheap but brand name Remington +p 38 ammo, so bad things can happen even with supposedly good ammo.

cockedandglocked
02-08-2016, 1:53 PM
Had my first IDPA introductory workshop today. Fun and learned a lot. Used my reloads and everything seemed all and good. Had a couple of misfeeds that I attributed to not seating the mag correctly after a couple of tactical reloads but apart from that, everything seemed to go well.

Finished the day and came home tonight. Started cleaning my gun and what do I find in the barrel?

A stuck bullet. A squib. Jammed in there. This really shook me up. Managed to get it out with a cleaning rod and a rubber mallet.

I am scared to think what would have happened if I had taken one more shot.

Not quite sure what to do now. I have about a thousand 9mm reloads. Break them all down?

I think I know what happened. I sometimes make dummy rounds without powder to test the bullet depth and somehow one of these may have gotten mixed in with the live rounds. I worry that there is another one of these out there.

Maybe I will just use them up during slow fire at the range and listen carefully for a weird sound. During an IDPA event, with the clock running, there is no way I would have heard it and no one else did either.

What puzzles me is that I finished the course of fire. So how did this one get lodged in there? Did I just get extremely lucky and this was the very last bullet? Weird. And freaky.


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Deja vu... didn't this same thing happen to another member last year? Went home and cleaned their gun, found a squib in the barrel... I'll try to dig up that thread

stator
02-08-2016, 1:55 PM
Live primer does not equal dummy round. Don't ever make dummy rounds again, and use the store bought ones.

If you need to test bullet depth, use the appropriate measuring tools... not live rounds which is what your "dummy" round was.

You dodged a bullet. Learn and move on.