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View Full Version : Ban Lead Ammo in Entire West ?


Gator Monroe
08-10-2008, 8:44 AM
On Drudge now The Poor California Condor needs help and our Lead ammo ban is up for expansion of the entire west ( Adding Oregon,Idaho,Nevada,Arizona,New Mexico,and the Rest of California now excluded from current ban ?) :eek:

CSACANNONEER
08-10-2008, 8:48 AM
Ban the Condor!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Gator Monroe
08-10-2008, 8:57 AM
Please someone tell me I misunderstood this Drudge report and It only means the California West ?:(:confused:

M. Sage
08-10-2008, 9:00 AM
If you had a link, that might be helpful.

Gator Monroe
08-10-2008, 9:05 AM
It's an AP story "California Condors Depend on humans to survive" ,cant find it on Drudge but it's in "Redding Record Searchlight" ! in the News section :confused:

Gator Monroe
08-10-2008, 9:08 AM
The Orinthologist's are seemingly united on this (We are in big trouble then):eek:

Ironchef
08-10-2008, 9:08 AM
Start preparing sushi and leaving platters of california rolls and unagi all over so the Condor get's the taste for it, then it won't eat the hoards of dead squirrels riddled with lead from our bullets and survive!! Friggen DUH!

M. Sage
08-10-2008, 9:19 AM
Google search for "California Condors Depend on humans to survive" turned up this:

http://www.mercurynews.com/breakingnews/ci_10152067

LOS ANGELES—A new study finds the endangered California condor is dependent on humans even in the wild and may not survive without a ban on lead ammunition in the West.

This week a blue-ribbon panel of the American Ornithologists' Union reported that condors are losing their ability to forage and depend on man-made "feeding stations." The birds have had almost no success mating in the wild without human intervention.

They must be frequently trapped, tested and treated for lead poisoning. California condors are scavengers and often feed on carcasses of animals killed by hunters using lead ammunition

Last year, $5 million was spent on condor recovery efforts.

If anything, that sounds like they're basically admitting that the condor can't really be considered a viable wild species. If that's not what they're saying, it should be after hearing that. :p

Then we have the LA Times twisting the same report:

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-condors9-2008aug09,0,3845910.story

Survival of California condors hangs on lead ban, study says
They depend on man-made 'feeding stations' of lead-free carcasses, a practice that has damaged their ability to forage. Scientists call for removal of such ammunition.
By Margot Roosevelt, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
August 9, 2008
The California condor, rescued from extinction in an elaborate and expensive recovery effort, has become tantamount to a zoo animal in the wild and can't survive on its own without a ban on lead ammunition across its vast western ranges, a scientific study has concluded.

(Its "vast western ranges?" WTF!? -M)

The majestic scavengers, bred in captivity and released to nature in recent decades, require "constant and costly human assistance," a blue-ribbon panel of the American Ornithologists' Union reported this week.

They must be frequently trapped, tested and treated for lead poisoning. They depend on man-made "feeding stations," a buffet of lead-free carcasses of rats, deer, stillborn calves and other animals, a practice that has damaged their ability to forage.

As for natural reproduction, the yearlong study found that the condors' nesting success was "nil" before intense intervention last year to vaccinate chicks for West Nile virus and surgically remove ingested refuse such as rags, nuts, bolts, plastic and bottle caps.

Human aid has led to "inappropriate behavior" of the condors, which are attracted to people and man-made structures, the 57-page report found. The gregarious birds perch on utility poles, risking electrocution and, in Southern California, have taken to soaring with hang gliders and mingling with humans to pick through food wrappers.

So much effort is required to feed, nurse and protect wild condors, the scientists wrote, "that one might argue that they constitute little more than outdoor zoo populations."

Since the last wild condor was captured in 1987, federal and state agencies, zoos and conservation groups have spent tens of millions of dollars breeding more than 300 birds in captivity. About 150 have been released to fly free over forests and deserts in California, Arizona, Utah, New Mexico and Baja California.

Condors -- North America's largest soaring birds -- have survived on the continent since the Pleistocene epoch. With a wingspan of up to 9 feet, they fly as far as 150 miles a day to forage. But with the disappearance of large mammals, such as mountain lions, they tend to feed on carrion left by human hunters.

(Mountain lions have disappeared? They're over-populated, you nutcase!!! -M)

Last year, $5 million was spent on condor recovery efforts, including $1.2 million from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The San Diego Wild Animal Park and the Arizona-based Peregrine Fund spent more than $1 million each, and the Los Angeles Zoo, which operates on damaged birds, spent more than $500,000, according to the report.

Government and private wildlife groups "cannot be expected to expend funds indefinitely to maintain condors in nature," the study said. "Progress toward recovery is not sustainable under current conditions because reintroduction of more condors simply increases the costs required to keep wild birds alive."

The six scientists on the panel have not been involved in the condor recovery program. Led by biologist Jeffrey R. Walters of the Avian Ecology Group at Virginia Tech University, they called for "an extensive outreach effort to rally support for replacement of lead ammunition" in condor territory and nationally.

"Poisoning from ingestion of spent ammunition in carcasses is so severe and chronic," the panel concluded, "that condor recovery cannot be achieved so long as such lead exposure continues."

But they also noted that humans who ingest meat from game can suffer adverse effects from lead: "Removing lead ammunition is not only right for condors, it is right for other scavengers, and it is right for hunters and their families."

(I came from a hunting culture, and nobody I know ever suffered from lead poisoning. Moron. -M)

The report called on the Fish and Wildlife Service, which oversees the recovery program, to "increase the visibility of its leadership."

An agency spokeswoman concurred that lead has had "a significant impact on condors" and said the service has already begun to implement some of the report's recommendations, including outreach to hunters.

Also, the service supports adding more feeding stations, but farther afield so that birds will forage more widely.

The National Rifle Assn. and other hunting groups have fought restrictions on lead bullets, which are cheaper than copper varieties.

Last year California became the first state to pass a law prohibiting hunters from using lead ammunition within the condor's 2,385-square-mile range. Lead is banned for shooting big game, such as deer, antelope, bear and non-game species, such as feral pigs and coyotes. Smaller game, such as birds and rabbits, can still be killed with lead bullets.

The law is "a huge step forward," Walters said. But the panel interviewed state officials, local conservationists and hunters, and found that enforcement "may be highly problematic. . . . California Fish and Game has done little to educate hunters . . . and [non-lead] ammunition is not readily available or identifiable in many retail outlets," according to the report.

Poachers kill large numbers of animals and are "unlikely to comply . . . as long as lead bullets are easily purchased," the study found. Despite a California law that provides subsidies to hunters to buy more expensive non-lead bullets, the state has yet to fund it.

California Fish and Game Commission officials said they have made considerable efforts to inform hunters, but a spokesman acknowledged that enforcement of the ban "will be a real challenge," given that only 200 wardens cover the entire state.

Utah, New Mexico, Arizona and Baja California do not restrict lead ammunition. But in Arizona, a voluntary program issues coupons to hunters to cover the additional cost of copper bullets and has had an 85% success rate, according to state officials.

The report found that despite Arizona's effort, condors are still being poisoned there. Given the condors' low reproductive rate, "a virtually 100% compliance rate" would be necessary to maintain the species.

margot.roosevelt@ latimes.com

Utah? Are there condors in Utah?

Personally, I'd be ready to throw in the towel on condors at this point. It's not lead ammo that's killing them. They're doing a fine job on their own.

HunterJim
08-10-2008, 9:39 AM
The actual report is here:

http://www.aou.org/committees/conservation/docs/AOU_CONDOR_REPORT_final.pdf

I read it yesterday, and it suffers from the usual problem with these bird-lead studies: it assumes the lead comes from hunters bullets, and then concludes that it is so. All the proponents are bird people, many have been involved in the condor recovery program and they can only see one side of the issue.

As a County fish and wildlife commissioner I have been looking for an impartial study that proves the condors only get lead from hunters bullets. There is no such thing, although the Cal Dept. of Fish & Game has funded a study that is due in 2009 that may be helpful. To date all the "proof" has been supplied by groups who believe it is true funding other people who also believe it is true to produce a study to prove it is true. It is like the human-caused global warming situation, and I expect Al Gore to weigh in any moment now.

This study also notes we hunters should not use lead in bullets because they think we are contaminated like the condors from eating wild game. Please don't notice that hunters don't have evidence of this lead burden. Please don't notice that the study ignores the major uses of lead in the US (batteries and other common items).

The study also notes that after lead is removed from all hunting bullets across the nation that this may not guarantee the condors survive. The condors also gather and feed their chicks trash, so the next push will be to remove that too.

jim

Gator Monroe
08-10-2008, 9:51 AM
Tree Huggin ,PETA types will push this (With help from the Dem/Lib anti's) and it deserves our attention ?

chris
08-10-2008, 11:39 AM
no shock here. thanks sam parades for shooting your mouth off last year. the camels nose is getting further in the tent. yep junk science has replaced common sense and unbiased studies.

heres a load of crap:
Condors -- North America's largest soaring birds -- have survived on the continent since the Pleistocene epoch. With a wingspan of up to 9 feet, they fly as far as 150 miles a day to forage. But with the disappearance of large mammals, such as mountain lions , they tend to feed on carrion left by human hunters.



mountail lions are not gone. i was out hunting this weekend and a mountain lion came within 30yrds of him. and we know that in the news that it appears that more and more people are encountering mountain lions than before. the mountain lion population is unchecked and un managed by this state.

yeah after seeing that the condor CANNOT live without human intervention is the reason to let the bird die out on its own. what a waste of money on a bird that should have been extinct many years ago. and it's all hunters fault that the bird is dying out. BS!!!!!

Solidsnake87
08-10-2008, 12:34 PM
Anybody know if Condor is tasty? If somebody has a recipe please share it!

Fjold
08-10-2008, 12:53 PM
The European Union is banning all lead bullets and I'm sure that the US will be next.

timmyb21
08-10-2008, 1:03 PM
LET THEM DIE!!! GOD DOESN'T WANT THEM ANYMORE! They're aparrently too stupid to survive on their own, so they don't deserve to live.

Solidmch
08-10-2008, 1:06 PM
All this for a stupid buzzard.:(

chris
08-10-2008, 1:13 PM
All this for a stupid buzzard.:(

yep and it sucks butt.

CSACANNONEER
08-10-2008, 1:20 PM
Anybody know if Condor is tasty? If somebody has a recipe please share it!

They taste like something in between spotted owl and bald eagle. The best thing is that a one egg omlet will feed 4 people and their dog too!

C.G.
08-10-2008, 2:38 PM
Anybody know if Condor is tasty? If somebody has a recipe please share it!

Tastes like rattlesnake.:D

Synergy
08-10-2008, 2:52 PM
It sickens me knowing how we humans have intervened with human natural selection for quite a few years. Now we are interfering with natural selection in the animal world. It cant survive with out being spoon fed and millions spent on saving it, it should meet Darwin and die!

M. Sage
08-10-2008, 6:53 PM
The actual report is here:

http://www.aou.org/committees/conservation/docs/AOU_CONDOR_REPORT_final.pdf

I read it yesterday, and it suffers from the usual problem with these bird-lead studies: it assumes the lead comes from hunters bullets, and then concludes that it is so. All the proponents are bird people, many have been involved in the condor recovery program and they can only see one side of the issue.

As a County fish and wildlife commissioner I have been looking for an impartial study that proves the condors only get lead from hunters bullets. There is no such thing, although the Cal Dept. of Fish & Game has funded a study that is due in 2009 that may be helpful. To date all the "proof" has been supplied by groups who believe it is true funding other people who also believe it is true to produce a study to prove it is true. It is like the human-caused global warming situation, and I expect Al Gore to weigh in any moment now.

This study also notes we hunters should not use lead in bullets because they think we are contaminated like the condors from eating wild game. Please don't notice that hunters don't have evidence of this lead burden. Please don't notice that the study ignores the major uses of lead in the US (batteries and other common items).

The study also notes that after lead is removed from all hunting bullets across the nation that this may not guarantee the condors survive. The condors also gather and feed their chicks trash, so the next push will be to remove that too.

jim

Thanks for posting that!

These people don't really know what the hell they're talking about... do they?

One carcass can contain enough lead to kill many condors due to the “snowstorm” effect (Figure 4) when lead rifle bullets shatter into hundreds of fragments as they enter an animal

xrMike
08-10-2008, 10:23 PM
The study also notes that after lead is removed from all hunting bullets across the nation that this may not guarantee the condors survive. The condors also gather and feed their chicks trash, so the next push will be to remove that too.Yes:

http://www.lazoo.org/conservation/condor-junkfood.html

And if you look at the actual mortality numbers (data through 2006), lead poisoning is NOT the leading cause of death, at least not here in CA:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v84/xrMike/misc/CondorMortality2.jpg

dwa
08-10-2008, 11:30 PM
i think its safe to say its been naturally selected

Pvt. Cowboy
08-10-2008, 11:54 PM
I just don't know why the hippies who are dead set on repopulating the wild with these ugly retarded poorly-designed birds don't just let Darwin's theory take it's course.

I mean, after all, Darwin is like religion for those kind of people, isn't he?

bernieb90
08-11-2008, 12:04 AM
So let me get this straight 85% of hunters in Arizona use lead free ammo and 11 condors die of lead poisoning. Kalifornia had no such program with most hunters using lead and 3 condors die of lead poisoning. Then we have 2 in Kali that died of copper toxicity and none in Arizona. Perhaps these guys should use some common sense here and figure maybe bullets are not the problem. Oh well maybe it will come to them in the hospital when they are recovering from being attacked by an extinct mountain lion.

Full Clip
08-11-2008, 12:26 AM
According to that chart, the real culprits here in CA are powerlines. Perhaps we should remove them all? Oh, and "drowning"? Time to get rid of all that pesky water... and ban "starvation," too as that seems to be killing a lot of 'em.

bulgron
08-11-2008, 7:41 AM
How in the world does a Condor drown??

LAK Supply
08-11-2008, 11:46 AM
Let.... them.... die.

steadyrock
08-11-2008, 2:24 PM
Does anybody know where a map can be found of the currently affected area?

chris
08-11-2008, 2:34 PM
Does anybody know where a map can be found of the currently affected area?

the DFG has one and i believe they have it on google maps also.

dfletcher
08-11-2008, 2:53 PM
Do condors lay one egg at a time or more than one? If multiple, I'll bet more condor chicks are killed being pushed out of the nest by "big brother" than die from lead.

What is the rational in saving a species from existence? I understand that losing bees or frogs or birds or owls or any other widely distributed species can have an impact on other species and a strong impact on our environment. Got it. But what impact can a very small number of birds have on other species or the environment?

Now if the answer is "we do it because we want to" or just because we should, well I guess that's a reason. But I'd like to know if loss of such small number of animals has any impact on the environment? Or given the reverse, is bring them back in wide numbers desireable or would they become a flying version of New Orlean's nutria?

IllTemperedCur
08-11-2008, 3:27 PM
Look at the mortality table footnotes. Out of 15 total deaths attributed to lead poisoning, 8 are "suspected but unconfirmed". More than half.

Which tells me that they haven't a clue as to what caused these birds' deaths, and just latched onto the condor death method de jour.

But I'd like to know if loss of such small number of animals has any impact on the environment?

Considering that condors fulfill the same ecological function of the turkey vulture (which are plentiful), I'd think that the answer would be obvious.

DrjonesUSA
08-13-2008, 2:48 PM
Just a thought.......if all the condors happened to die out suddenly, would there be any grounds at all for pushing this ban?

DrjonesUSA
08-13-2008, 2:50 PM
The European Union is banning all lead bullets and I'm sure that the US will be next.



Really?? Can you post a link to confirm??

And what is THEIR basis for doing this??

Gator Monroe
08-13-2008, 3:04 PM
Really?? Can you post a link to confirm??

And what is THEIR basis for doing this??

EU is ending private firearms ownership by 2011 so why have any kind of ammunition available ... lol:eek:

johnny_22
08-13-2008, 3:05 PM
" The issue has nr EU 2001/1208/R at the Swedish Ministry of Environment and nr 2001/305S at the EU Commission.

The ban will be in force from January 1, 2008. Lead bullets may only be used after this date if they are collected in special bullet traps. The government is not willing to grant any exemptions from the ban."

http://www.pistolskytte.org/info/Swedish_Government_will_Ban_Lead_Ammunition.html

Denmark wants to follow:

Evaluation of the Danish Statutory Order on Lead

http://www2.mst.dk/common/Udgivramme/Frame.asp?http://www2.mst.dk/Udgiv/publications/2006/87-7052-314-2/html/indhold_eng.htm

I thouht Lapua would have Pb-free rimfire before CCI. But, CCI beat them to it.

DrjonesUSA
08-13-2008, 3:33 PM
EU is ending private firearms ownership by 2011 so why have any kind of ammunition available ... lol:eek:


Again, these sorts of statements should not be made in jest - are you serious about this?

jumbopanda
08-13-2008, 3:49 PM
Again, these sorts of statements should not be made in jest - are you serious about this?

Either he's pulling stuff out of his *** or my Google-fu just isn't strong enough.

HunterJim
08-13-2008, 4:18 PM
According to the USGS 3.5% of the lead used in the US is in ammunition (of all sorts). 85% is in automobile batteries, and the other 11.5% is split in a variety of uses. Those percentages are of a base of 3 billion pounds of lead.

It is not obvious to me that there is more lead in bullets in condor country than there is from, say, wheel weights.

Tejon Ranch eliminated lead bullets on their hunting areas, and after six months two condors feeding on the ranch died of lead ingestion according to the LA Times. So where did that lead come from?

jim

Equalizer2
08-13-2008, 4:30 PM
The EPA has been trying to ban Lead Bullets in the US, since 1995.

http://www.gunowners.org/news/nws9502.htm
:mad::mad::mad:

gose
08-13-2008, 4:52 PM
" The issue has nr EU 2001/1208/R at the Swedish Ministry of Environment and nr 2001/305S at the EU Commission.
The ban will be in force from January 1, 2008. Lead bullets may only be used after this date if they are collected in special bullet traps. The government is not willing to grant any exemptions from the ban."
http://www.pistolskytte.org/info/Swedish_Government_will_Ban_Lead_Ammunition.html
Denmark wants to follow:
Evaluation of the Danish Statutory Order on Lead
http://www2.mst.dk/common/Udgivramme/Frame.asp?http://www2.mst.dk/Udgiv/publications/2006/87-7052-314-2/html/indhold_eng.htm
I thouht Lapua would have Pb-free rimfire before CCI. But, CCI beat them to it.

Stop spreading FUD...

You are correct that the government in Sweden did not want to grant any exceptions to the lead ban. However, a more conservative and less tree-hugging government was voted into office almost two years ago and they trashed that law before it took effect, so no, there is no lead ban in effect in Sweden, nor are there any new ones proposed at this point.

And no, the EU will not ban private ownership of firearms in 2011.

Back on topic...

Funny how 3 condors died from lead poisoning and 2 from copper.... Maybe switching to copper bullet will "solve" the condor problem faster than if we continue to use lead bullets ;)

Meplat
08-13-2008, 5:33 PM
Condors don't eat squirrels!! they can't survive on squirrels, rabbits, varments, etc. They need larger "pray".


Start preparing sushi and leaving platters of california rolls and unagi all over so the Condor get's the taste for it, then it won't eat the hoards of dead squirrels riddled with lead from our bullets and survive!! Friggen DUH!

Meplat
08-13-2008, 5:44 PM
This is what the level headed honest biologists in our department have been telling me for years. The Condor is a creature of the plasticine epic and has no nitch in this era. Unless we turn the entire state into a "zoo" there is no way to save the condor as a wild species.:TFH:


If anything, that sounds like they're basically admitting that the condor can't really be considered a viable wild species. If that's not what they're saying, it should be after hearing that. :p

chris
08-13-2008, 5:51 PM
This is what the level headed honest biologists in our department have been telling me for years. The Condor is a creature of the plasticine epic and has no nitch in this era. Unless we turn the entire state into a "zoo" there is no way to save the condor as a wild species.:TFH:

+1. this is the reason the state is so stupid that they have to save a bird that cannot live without human intervention. and it's hunters fault they are dying out. what BS. let the bird die out.

Meplat
08-13-2008, 5:54 PM
WHAT!?!? Mountain Lions are the main predator of the few spices that the Condor can still survive on! Give me a break!



no shock here. thanks sam parades for shooting your mouth off last year. the camels nose is getting further in the tent. yep junk science has replaced common sense and unbiased studies.

heres a load of crap:


mountail lions are not gone. i was out hunting this weekend and a mountain lion came within 30yrds of him. and we know that in the news that it appears that more and more people are encountering mountain lions than before. the mountain lion population is unchecked and un managed by this state.

yeah after seeing that the condor CANNOT live without human intervention is the reason to let the bird die out on its own. what a waste of money on a bird that should have been extinct many years ago. and it's all hunters fault that the bird is dying out. BS!!!!!

chris
08-13-2008, 5:56 PM
WHAT!?!? Mountain Lions are the main predator of the few spices that the Condor can still survive on! Give me a break!

if your WHAT is refering to the hunter near my camp that came within 30 yrds. yes it did. and i did refer to the article that said the with the disapearance of the mountain lion. i believe that is at the beginning of the thread.

this is what i wa refering to that is missing in your post.

Condors -- North America's largest soaring birds -- have survived on the continent since the Pleistocene epoch. With a wingspan of up to 9 feet, they fly as far as 150 miles a day to forage. But with the disappearance of large mammals, such as mountain lions , they tend to feed on carrion left by human hunters.

thats the load of BS i was refering to.

Meplat
08-13-2008, 8:08 PM
Six months is nothing compared to 500 years of lead bullet use. Bullets in the crop of a buzzard (condor) would probably take a very long time to cause death. However, did anyone do an autopsy on the buzzards? Lead bullets in the crop would seem to me to be very easy to conferm or exclude. If they were found, my guess is it would have been widely reported. Therefor I conclude they were not.

Any one who has ever operated a gold dredge can tell you CA's rivers and streams are full of bullets, from musket balls to modern premium varieties. I doubt they hurt anything, and no matter what you do they will be there for the next several thousand years.






According to the USGS 3.5% of the lead used in the US is in ammunition (of all sorts). 85% is in automobile batteries, and the other 11.5% is split in a variety of uses. Those percentages are of a base of 3 billion pounds of lead.

It is not obvious to me that there is more lead in bullets in condor country than there is from, say, wheel weights.

Tejon Ranch eliminated lead bullets on their hunting areas, and after six months two condors feeding on the ranch died of lead ingestion according to the LA Times. So where did that lead come from?

jim

Meplat
08-13-2008, 8:14 PM
They would think of something. Put away the shotgun!;)



Just a thought.......if all the condors happened to die out suddenly, would there be any grounds at all for pushing this ban?

DrjonesUSA
08-13-2008, 11:54 PM
They would think of something. Put away the shotgun!;)


I didn't think a shotgun was a suitable weapon for taking out a condor anyhow.....those are big birds!!! You'd probably want to use a rifle......theoretically speaking, of course......

:43:

Meplat
08-14-2008, 11:33 AM
Of course

......theoretically speaking, of course......

:43:

CowboyShooter
08-14-2008, 12:04 PM
This week a blue-ribbon panel of the American Ornithologists' Union reported that condors are losing their ability to forage and depend on man-made "feeding stations." The birds have had almost no success mating in the wild without human intervention.

now THAT has got to be a government-funded job....

"what do you do?"

"I'm a professional condor fluffer"

:D

HunterJim
08-15-2008, 9:36 AM
Six months is nothing compared to 500 years of lead bullet use. Bullets in the crop of a buzzard (condor) would probably take a very long time to cause death. However, did anyone do an autopsy on the buzzards? Lead bullets in the crop would seem to me to be very easy to conferm or exclude. If they were found, my guess is it would have been widely reported. Therefor I conclude they were not.

Any one who has ever operated a gold dredge can tell you CA's rivers and streams are full of bullets, from musket balls to modern premium varieties. I doubt they hurt anything, and no matter what you do they will be there for the next several thousand years.

I have picked up lead balls and conicals from Revolutionary War and Civil War battlefields too, but I didn't have to kick condors or buzzards out of the way to do it. Where do bullets in stream beds of laying on the ground cross paths with condors?

Six months is long enough so carcasses that might have lead would be gone.

jim

SkatinJJ
08-16-2008, 6:50 AM
Just a thought.......if all the condors happened to die out suddenly, would there be any grounds at all for pushing this ban?

This state's antis would find a way for not only pushing the ban but include blaming second-hand smoke so they can ban cigarettes also. Their hypocrisy knows no bottom limit. They want to stop people from smoking tobacco cigarettes, but they encourage the use of Marijuana.

ar15barrels
08-16-2008, 7:25 AM
Six months is long enough so carcasses that might have lead would be gone.

While the carcasses may be gone, I don't think the lead causes instant death.
The ones dying from lead have probably ingested a LOT of it for a LONG TIME.
So, just because Tejon banned lead and there were no carcasses with lead for condors to forage, that does not stop the condors from either (a) eating carcasses somewhere else or (b) dying from lead ingested well before the ban.

We will still see statistics in the future showing condors dying from lead, even well after our lead ban went into effect.