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View Full Version : What caliber for elk and caribou?


DrunkSkunk
08-07-2008, 2:49 PM
What round is preferred by you guys to take elk and caribou?

Anyone have experience with 375 H&H?

Timberwolf
08-07-2008, 2:58 PM
What round is preferred by you guys to take elk and caribou?

Anyone have experience with 375 H&H?

DOn't know about caribou but a 375 H&H is not needed for Elk. A 30-06 with 180 gn soft points will do just fine.

hybridatsun350
08-07-2008, 3:47 PM
What round is preferred by you guys to take elk and caribou?

What kind of rifles do you own? I would say any long action 7mm, or .30 caliber cartridge could get the job done. It's all about shot placement! ;)

DOn't know about caribou but a 375 H&H is not needed for Elk. A 30-06 with 180 gn soft points will do just fine.

+1 -Sounds like it would get the job done just fine!

DrunkSkunk
08-07-2008, 4:08 PM
Well I was thinking about 7mm but anything under 8mm I think is for varmint shooting, and I think 7mm is on the iffy side for large elk, wouldn't be that effective for caribou I would think either. 30 cal might be ok for under 100 yards but I want to be about 300yds out.

I want it for elk, caribou, hogs... bears ....

I was even thinking about a 45-70 but not sure.

So far I'm thinking 375 H&H and for my pistol I'll throw 12" 50beowulf onto my AR pistol.

PatriotnMore
08-07-2008, 4:09 PM
I agree with both poster above. Again I'll be in CO. for third Elk, and I use 30-06 180 gn for all Large N. American game. It will do the job just fine, and as has been mentioned above, shot placement is King!

Fjold
08-07-2008, 5:38 PM
I own a 375 H&H and I've hunted elk so I have some experience there also.

I've taken two elk with a 308 loaded with 165 grain bullets, one using a 30.06 with a 180 grain bullet and two with a 54 caliber muzzleloader using 430 grain minis, all with one shot.

JMHO, The 375 H&H is not necessary for Elk and Caribou. Anything from the 308 up through the small bore (7, 30, 338) magnums is more than enough gun.

Pronghorn
08-07-2008, 5:46 PM
.338 Win [/thread]

308fan
08-07-2008, 5:59 PM
Yup, the 338 WM is very versatile round. It can be loaded up and down. You cant go wrong with that one.

Gunaria
08-07-2008, 6:00 PM
.300 Wetherby Mag :D

Vigilante
08-07-2008, 9:04 PM
Well I was thinking about 7mm but anything under 8mm I think is for varmint shooting, and I think 7mm is on the iffy side for large elk, wouldn't be that effective for caribou I would think either. 30 cal might be ok for under 100 yards but I want to be about 300yds out.

What makes you think that? 7mm mag would be pretty much perfect for what you want to do. Even 7mm-08 would do you well. I definitely would not be considering .375 H&H, unless you are just going for the cool factor.

Cypriss32
08-07-2008, 9:16 PM
30-06 with 180gr Barnes TSX, or if you reload 200gr TSX and a warm load of Rl22.

DrunkSkunk
08-08-2008, 3:03 AM
Factory ammo guys, I don't reload.

Moonclip
08-08-2008, 4:04 AM
What round is preferred by you guys to take elk and caribou?

Anyone have experience with 375 H&H?

In Brokeback Mountain a .30-30 sufficed! Really though is'nt a properly loaded .30-06 good enough for anything in the contenental US except for maybe bison?

Sydwaiz
08-08-2008, 8:11 AM
.300 Wetherby Mag :D

Exactly what I was going to say!

Ol Roy loved his .257 Weatherby too!

6.5x55 Swede has been known to be very effective too.

But I agree, 30-06 or similiar should do just fine for any N. American game.

ivanimal
08-08-2008, 8:22 AM
.30-378 Weatherby Magnum

I dont own one of these but a friend of mine who hunts caribou every year has settled on this cartridge. The ballistics are impressive to say the least.

Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
165 gr (10.7 g) BST 3,500 ft/s (1,100 m/s) 4,488 ft·lbf (6,085 J)
180 gr (12 g) BST 3,420 ft/s (1,040 m/s) 4,676 ft·lbf (6,340 J)
200 gr (13 g) Partition 3,160 ft/s (960 m/s) 4,434 ft·lbf (6,012 J)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.30-378_Weatherby_Magnum

PatriotnMore
08-08-2008, 8:51 AM
In Brokeback Mountain a .30-30 sufficed! Really though is'nt a properly loaded .30-06 good enough for anything in the Continental US except for maybe bison?

Although 30-06 may work on all game found in the Continental US, I would rather have something more robust, as in some of the calibers mentioned, or my favorite the .375 for Moose, and big brown/polar bear, and yes Bison. These animals are large boned, have thick hides, and to a degree their fat layer is an issue for some calibers which don't have the knock down/punching power I would want.

Let me add, a 30-06 will take the game I mentioned above, but as a hunter, I want to put the least amount of rounds in the animal to save meat, and put it down as humanly as possible, so I want the largest effective round.
I won't get into the debate over, well why not a .410 rigby then?
IMHO, for very large and dangerous Continental game, anything larger than .375 is good to go.

Fjold
08-08-2008, 1:29 PM
Because the cheapest factory loads for the 416 Rigby are about $80/box and premium factory loads are >$200 for a box of 20 rounds.

BlueOvalBruin
08-08-2008, 4:01 PM
Well I was thinking about 7mm but anything under 8mm I think is for varmint shooting, and I think 7mm is on the iffy side for large elk, wouldn't be that effective for caribou I would think either. 30 cal might be ok for under 100 yards but I want to be about 300yds out.

I want it for elk, caribou, hogs... bears ....

I was even thinking about a 45-70 but not sure.

So far I'm thinking 375 H&H and for my pistol I'll throw 12" 50beowulf onto my AR pistol.

Stay away from the fast 30's, speed only ruins meat and makes it hard on bullets to perform consistently. I think you have the right idea with the 375 H&H, 45-70, and 50Beowulf. 375 H&H is nice because it's a big, heavy bullet at a moderate speed. 45-70 does the same job at a lower speed but with less penetration potential (not a big problem with the animals you're considering). The 50Beowulf has enough power to shatter both shoulders on either animal.

BTW, how do you like that 12" 50Beo pistol? How is the recoil on that thing and what kind of sight do you use for something like that? I have a 16" 50Beo AR and love it, but am interested in making an AR pistol in 50Beo too.

Thefeeder
08-08-2008, 10:19 PM
Bud used an off the rack Win M70 in 270win , fractory ammo....bagged an elk most every year...go figure!

Randall
08-09-2008, 9:07 PM
I'm a big fan of the .35 Whelen on elk myself. I've also used 7Mag, but it does tend to ruin more meat than the Whelen. As do the 300 Win Mags.

I met guys on the mountain who hunt cow elk with a .243. My pop always used a .30-06, and I personally wouldn't bring anything smaller than a .30-06, but that is just me. Elk is a big critter. Even the cows wiegh in @ 450 - 500lbs. But, you should use what you shoot best. Shot placement is king. If it's a 375 H&H, then have at it. Just make sure you can shoot it.
Randy

CSACANNONEER
08-09-2008, 9:15 PM
.30-378 Weatherby Magnum

I dont own one of these yet but a friend of mine who hunts caribou every year has settled on this cartridge. The ballistics are impressive to say the least.

Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy
165 gr (10.7 g) BST 3,500 ft/s (1,100 m/s) 4,488 ft·lbf (6,085 J)
180 gr (12 g) BST 3,420 ft/s (1,040 m/s) 4,676 ft·lbf (6,340 J)
200 gr (13 g) Partition 3,160 ft/s (960 m/s) 4,434 ft·lbf (6,012 J)


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.30-378_Weatherby_Magnum

I fixed it for you.

Gry101
08-11-2008, 8:46 AM
Going to CO for first season elk. The five of use have, 2x .338 WinMag, .300 WinMag, 7mm Mag, 7mm STW. All have been effective.

Andrew

ivanimal
08-11-2008, 9:04 AM
I fixed it for you.

LOL!:D

timmyb21
08-11-2008, 12:02 PM
My 7mag has taken more elk than I can count...mostly because they were taken by my uncle, but still. 7mag will do fine. Nothing below a .270 (my opinion).

PorkLover
08-11-2008, 4:19 PM
.270 gets my vote.....

mzimmers
08-16-2008, 7:57 PM
Sheesh! Some of you guys are WAY overboard with your requirements here. Elk and caribou aren't that hard to kill. A .270 is plenty, a 7mm Rem mag is more than plenty, and a .375 H&H is unnecessary unless you're going to Africa or for grizzlies/polar bears.

You're only trying to kill the animal, not butcher him and grind the meat all at once...

1911_Mitch
08-16-2008, 8:22 PM
What about a .308 ?

Say load was Hornady 155 gr AMAX ?

Thefeeder
08-16-2008, 8:35 PM
Sheesh! Some of you guys are WAY overboard with your requirements here. Elk and caribou aren't that hard to kill. A .270 is plenty, a 7mm Rem mag is more than plenty, and a .375 H&H is unnecessary unless you're going to Africa or for grizzlies/polar bears.

You're only trying to kill the animal, not butcher him and grind the meat all at once...


+1 to that...

"The less fish they catch, the more crap they buy"

mzimmers
08-16-2008, 8:37 PM
The .308 is probably OK, but how about using a slightly heavier bullet? I don't know much about loading the .308, but I think a 165 or 180 grain will still develop good velocity, and be plenty accurate (assuming the barrel can twist the 180 OK).

Almost certainly a better choice than a .375 H&H. Adequate power and about 1/3 the recoil.

EDITED:

After I posted the above, it occurred to me that many people may be basing their impressions of several cartridges on relatively obsolete information. There are a ton of cartridges that have had new life breathed into them by better powders, and bullets that can take advantage of those powders. For more information on this, you might want to pick up the new Barnes reloading manual. You might be surprised by what some of these .2XX guns can do these days!

Trapper
08-16-2008, 9:35 PM
Unless you plan to hop out of your truck and shoot one from the road, you may want to consider the total weight of the rifle. My 30-06 weighs less than nine pounds with scope, bases, rings and sling. The same set up in .375 h&h will weigh in closer to 12lbs. after a few hours of hiking an extra three pounds can make all the difference in the world. Also consider the availability and cost of ammo.