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Californio
08-07-2008, 12:17 PM
http://www.santacruzpl.org/readyref/files/c/calcons.shtml

Looking at why California does not have RKBA in the Constitution. The Constitution had 48 signers, so I looked at their birthplace to maybe see their place of origin and political thought. It would be interesting to look back at their States of Origin to get an understanding how they viewed the Bill of Rights. Europeans and California born did not have a history of RKBA, that's eleven members and add that to the far Eastern States you have a majority. So we have to look at the Eastern States especially New York.

So the next question to be answered, how did New York view RKBA in 1848.

Any thoughts on the riddle?


We have five born in Europe, six born in California, 25 born in the Eastern States and twelve born in the Southern/Inland States.



Europe Born

Scotland 1
Switzerland 1
Spain 1
France 1
Bordeau 1

Total 5

East States Born

New York 12
New Jersey 1
Connecticut 1
Rhode Island 1
Maryland 5
Massachusetts 2
Maine 1
Vermont 1
Pennsylvania 1

Total East States 25

Southern/Inland Born

Tennessee 1
Florida 1
Ohio 3
Kentucky 3
Missouri 1
Virginia 3

Total Southern/Inland 12

California Born 6

GuyW
08-07-2008, 12:19 PM
Maybe these men came here because they respected our Bill of Rights...all of it?

Unfortunately, this line of inquiry may be interesting, but I doubt any hard proof will result...

FreedomIsNotFree
08-07-2008, 4:32 PM
Joel P. Walker, a forefather of mine, signed the 1849 California Constitution in Monterey, CA. He was Scotch Irish who's family first imigrated to Virginia. His brother, Joseph R. Walker, led the first expeditions over the Sierra...various landmarks carry his name. Joel also led wagon trains across the plains into California and along the Oregon trail.

As a frontier family, I can guarantee you Joel was always armed and relied upon his firearms not only for hunting game to feed the family, but also to defend his family from harm.

I have a lot of info on both Joel and Joseph...let me know if you need more specifics.

Californio
08-07-2008, 5:14 PM
, a forefather of mine, signed the 1849 California Constitution in Monterey, CA. He was Scotch Irish who's family first imigrated to Virginia. His brother, Joseph R. Walker, led the first expeditions over the Sierra...various landmarks carry his name. Joel also led wagon trains across the plains into California and along the Oregon trail.

As a frontier family, I can guarantee you Joel was always armed and relied upon his firearms not only for hunting game to feed the family, but also to defend his family from harm.

I have a lot of info on both Joel and Joseph...let me know if you need more specifics.

That is fantastic History, any idea how far the family goes back in Virginia?

I am going to start prowling around, on the web, the Constitutions of the Northeast States and see how or if which ones had BOR mentions in their documents.

Librarian
08-07-2008, 6:40 PM
Not many seem to have had a clear RKBA. I know I was surprised.

See FindLaw (http://www.findlaw.com/11stategov/index.html) for a starting place.

FreedomIsNotFree
08-08-2008, 1:08 AM
That is fantastic History, any idea how far the family goes back in Virginia?

I am going to start prowling around, on the web, the Constitutions of the Northeast States and see how or if which ones had BOR mentions in their documents.

The Walkers arrived at the New World in 1729. They were basically a frontier family that moved west as the lands in the east became more and more populated. From Virginia they headed to Tennessee then Missouri then into California and Oregon.

In Virginia, religion was the main powerhouse. The Presbyterians, the majority of folk in the area, organized themselves around the church and any historical writings regarding "arms", I would guess, would be in associated documents...that may be an area to research.

The Walkers, individually and as a family, were heavily represented in the American Revolution. They held various important posts while fighting the British. One of the uncles actually helped organize a prisoner exchange with the British that included the then 14 year old Andrew Jackson who later became President. To say "arms" were critical to their existence would be an understatement.