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Satex
07-22-2008, 7:33 PM
Ok, educate me, what does incorporation mean as it relates to 2A, the Heller case and gun laws?

Hopi
07-22-2008, 7:35 PM
Ok, educate me, what does incorporation mean as it relates to 2A, the Heller case and gun laws?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Incorporation_(Bill_of_Rights)

Librarian
07-22-2008, 7:56 PM
Wikipedia article is pretty good, but the short answer is
"Does the Bill of Rights apply to the states? - depends on what SCOTUS has said - some of the amendments have been incorporated, some have not."

5150Marcelo
07-22-2008, 8:11 PM
in spanish it means I am gonna have one more beer then knock out.!

Kestryll
07-22-2008, 8:23 PM
Incorporation Doctrine

A constitutional doctrine whereby selected provisions of the Bill of Rights are made applicable to the states through the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

The doctrine of selective incorporation, or simply the incorporation doctrine, makes the first ten amendments to the Constitution—known as the Bill of Rights—binding on the states. Through incorporation, state governments largely are held to the same standards as the federal government with regard to many constitutional rights, including the First Amendment freedoms of speech, religion, and assembly, and the separation of church and state; the Fourth Amendment freedoms from unwarranted arrest and unreasonable searches and seizures; the fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination; and the Sixth Amendment right to a speedy, fair, and public trial. Some provisions of the Bill of Rights—including the requirement of indictment by a Grand Jury (Sixth Amendment) and the right to a jury trial in civil cases (Seventh Amendment)—have not been applied to the states through the incorporation doctrine.

Blue
07-22-2008, 8:24 PM
Kes knows all...
:King:
Incorporation Doctrine

A constitutional doctrine whereby selected provisions of the Bill of Rights are made applicable to the states through the due process clause of the Fourteenth Amendment.

The doctrine of selective incorporation, or simply the incorporation doctrine, makes the first ten amendments to the Constitution—known as the Bill of Rights—binding on the states. Through incorporation, state governments largely are held to the same standards as the federal government with regard to many constitutional rights, including the First Amendment freedoms of speech, religion, and assembly, and the separation of church and state; the Fourth Amendment freedoms from unwarranted arrest and unreasonable searches and seizures; the fifth amendment privilege against self-incrimination; and the Sixth Amendment right to a speedy, fair, and public trial. Some provisions of the Bill of Rights—including the requirement of indictment by a Grand Jury (Sixth Amendment) and the right to a jury trial in civil cases (Seventh Amendment)—have not been applied to the states through the incorporation doctrine.