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aileron
07-21-2008, 6:17 AM
The downward spiral continues...

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1036561/Now-1-000-laws-let-state-home.html


Now there are 1,000 laws that will let the state into your home

By Simon Walters
Last updated at 8:56 AM on 20th July 2008

Police raid

Extreme measures: There are more than 1,000 laws which give officials the right to enter private property

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/07/19/article-1036561-014F3B6900000578-809_233x377.jpg

The march of the Big Brother state under Labour was highlighted last night as it was revealed that there are now 1,043 laws that give the authorities the power to enter a home or business.

Nearly half have been introduced since Labour came to power 11 years ago. They include the right to:

Invade your home to see if your pot plants have pests or do not have a 'plant passport' (Plant Health England Order 2005).

Survey your home and garden to see if your hedge is too high (Anti-Social Behaviour Act 2003).

Check that accommodation given to asylum seekers is not being lived in by non-asylum seekers (Immigration and Asylum Act 1999).

Raid a house to check if unlicensed gambling is taking place (Gambling Act 2005 Inspection Regulations 2007).

Seize fridges without the correct energy rating (Energy Information Household Refrigerators and Freezers Regulations 2004).

The rise in clipboard-wielding state inspectors flies in the face of repeated pledges by Ministers to curb the power of bureaucrats.

The full extent of the state's 'powers of entry' is revealed in documents slipped out quietly by the Government last week.

The information was posted on the Home Office website, but in a highly unusual move, the computer file was locked to prevent it being copied or printed. A secret Home Office password was required to access the file.

A Home Office spokeswoman denied the restrictions were an attempt to stop the state's powers being circulated more widely.

She claimed it was a 'mistake' and the file would be unlocked tomorrow.

Some 420 new powers of entry are the product of laws introduced since 1997. A further 16 are in laws due to be approved by Parliament in the next few weeks.

A recent study by the Centre for Policy Studies think-tank warned that the 'proliferation and variety' of such laws mean householders can no longer 'realistically be aware' of their rights and legal obligations.

Gordon Brown last year announced a review of 'powers of entry' laws and said they would be subjected to a 'liberty test' to stop abuses by the state.

However, new powers set to be approved by Parliament include inspecting for non-human genetic material, for looted cultural property from Iraq and for 'undeclared' carbon dioxide, as well as enforcing bin tax.

Town hall 'bin police' already have the right to enter homes, take photographs, seize contents of bins, and 'investigate as required'.

Householders can be fined up to 5,000 if they refuse entry or 'obstruct' an official.

Shadow Communities Secretary Eric Pickles said: 'Day by day under Labour, the rights and liberties of law-abiding citizens are being eroded.'

More...

* In full: Home Office list of our 1,000-plus Big Brother laws (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1036570/In-Home-Office-list-1-000-plus-Big-Brother-laws.html)
* MAIL ON SUNDAY COMMENT: These ludicrous, and sinister, snooping laws (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1036559/MAIL-ON-SUNDAY-COMMENT-These-ludicrous-sinister-snooping-laws.html)

dfletcher
07-21-2008, 9:22 AM
"Gordon Brown last year announced a review of 'powers of entry' laws and said they would be subjected to a 'liberty test' to stop abuses by the state."

So the state will decide if the state has too much authority? Gee, I wonder how that will turn out.

Nevermore
07-21-2008, 10:29 AM
"Gordon Brown last year announced a review of 'powers of entry' laws and said they would be subjected to a 'liberty test' to stop abuses by the state."

So the state will decide if the state has too much authority? Gee, I wonder how that will turn out.
That's one of the effects of Parliamentary Sovereignty (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parliamentary_sovereignty). Parliament is answerable to no one but itself. There are no courts which can overrule its laws, and the monarch (head of state) is a figurehead. Whatever reserve powers (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reserve_powers) the Queen still retains are exercised at the behest (and decision) of the Prime Minister. If the Queen exercised them of her own will, it'd break the last couple of century's tradition and likely throw the country into a Constitutional crisis.

There's a reason American governing institutions evolved the way they did. :)

tyrist
07-21-2008, 10:37 AM
Well on their way to the dark future of "V" it would seems.

Waiting to hear ENGLAND Prevails.

gazzavc
07-21-2008, 5:10 PM
There's a reason many of us emigrated in the 70's.......

We saw the signs, they read "Bloody Awful" , they were right.

G

Nose Nuggets
07-21-2008, 5:39 PM
dont for a second think its not already starting here. just look at how the wire tapping thing turned out.


/add something here about if you have nothing to hide....