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View Full Version : CCW only valid in county that it's issued?


AaronHorrocks
07-20-2008, 8:41 PM
I keep hearing from certain people that a California CCW is only valid in the county that it's issued in. :confused:

What? Why do they call it a California CCW then? :confused:

Is this true? I don't believe it!

Please cite any specific law and source it.

s2000news
07-20-2008, 8:42 PM
Never heard that before.

bulgron
07-20-2008, 8:46 PM
It's not true. There's just a lot of people out there with really bad information and who are more than happy to spread that bad information to anyone who will listen.

California CCWs are valid state-wide. I know of no exceptions to this rule.

Knauga
07-20-2008, 8:52 PM
http://la.metblogs.com/archives/images/2007/02/california_ccw.gif

Like it says, state of California.

CSDGuy
07-20-2008, 8:53 PM
CCW's issued by to a non-resident of a county would only be good for 90 days and good only in the county that it's issued in. Basically, it's issued to a person who needs a CCW, lives in another county than the business, and the business/place of employment is the reason for the CCW.

PC 12050 (a) (2) (A)
(ii) If the licensee's place of employment or business was the
basis for issuance of the license pursuant to subparagraph (A) of
paragraph (1), the license is valid for any period of time not to
exceed 90 days from the date of the license. The license shall be
valid only in the county in which the license was originally issued.

CCWFacts
07-20-2008, 9:02 PM
CCW's issued by to a non-resident of a county would only be good for 90 days and good only in the county that it's issued in. Basically, it's issued to a person who needs a CCW, lives in another county than the business, and the business/place of employment is the reason for the CCW.

Non-resident CCWs are basically never issued.

It is possible for an issuing authority to write any type of restriction on a CCW, and some did write "only in county" restrictions on them, but I don't hear about it happening lately.

Decoligny
07-20-2008, 9:07 PM
They could also be confusing this with the Open Carry permit which is only issued in counties with a population of less than 200,000 and only good in the county of issue.

The fact that to anyones knowledge no Open Carry permit has ever been issued is beside the fact.

CSDGuy
07-20-2008, 9:10 PM
Non-resident CCWs are basically never issued.

It is possible for an issuing authority to write any type of restriction on a CCW, and some did write "only in county" restrictions on them, but I don't hear about it happening lately.
I have also heard of these 90 day CCW's being rarely issued. Last year, or so, outgoing SSD Sheriff Lou Blanas approved a 90 Day that somehow got issued as a standard 2 year version. Sheriff McGinness revoked it as soon as it was discovered that the person it was issued to hadn't taken the training. It may have been a temporary "emergency" kind of 90 day permit, with a "go get trained" and we'll approve a 2 year CCW for you. At around that time, McGinness basically made it almost impossible to get a CCW. It was hard before... now it's supposed to be even more difficult.

IOW: 90 day permits are supposed to be very rare.

CSDGuy
07-20-2008, 9:11 PM
They could also be confusing this with the Open Carry permit which is only issued in counties with a population of less than 200,000 and only good in the county of issue.

The fact that to anyones knowledge no Open Carry permit has ever been issued is beside the fact.
Exactly. Not too many counties have >200,000 persons in them... and they're all rural anyway. Easier to issue a CCW

tenpercentfirearms
07-21-2008, 8:48 AM
An issuing agency could make that a limitation as the conditions of the permit. I haven't heard of that happening. I have heard of Bakersfield City limiting carry only to and from the business, to the bank, to your home. That is why I have a Kern County permit. Anywhere in California baby!

RomanDad
07-21-2008, 11:34 AM
Mine is good state wide.

Glock22Fan
07-21-2008, 11:39 AM
I have also heard of these 90 day CCW's being rarely issued.

Why would anyone spend $500 or so, do all the training and wait maybe a year or so to get a non-renewable permit that only lasts 90 days?

AaronHorrocks
07-21-2008, 12:35 PM
The same reason I spent $850 and bought my first handgun.

An on going life-threatening situation where police were of little to no help. You can earn another $500 to $850, but getting another life isn't so easy.

Glock22Fan
07-21-2008, 1:00 PM
The same reason I spent $850 and bought my first handgun.

An on going life-threatening situation where police were of little to no help. You can earn another $500 to $850, but getting another life isn't so easy.

I've spent that much on more than one of my handguns, but I expect those to protect me for well over 90 days.

How many people can really say it is worth spending $500 to protect themselves for just 90 days a year or so into the future? And what do you do in the meantime?

If your need is that great, I suspect most people would go illegal and carry without a permit. (Note, I'm not recommending this, but, in some circumstances, I can understand it)

Librarian
07-21-2008, 1:33 PM
If your need is that great, I suspect most people would go illegal and carry without a permit. (Note, I'm not recommending this, but, in some circumstances, I can understand it)
It would be illegal, but possibly excusable:12025.5. (a) A violation of Section 12025 is justifiable when a
person who possesses a firearm reasonably believes that he or she is
in grave danger because of circumstances forming the basis of a
current restraining order issued by a court against another person or
persons who has or have been found to pose a threat to his or her
life or safety. This section may not apply when the circumstances
involve a mutual restraining order issued pursuant to Division 10
(commencing with Section 6200) of the Family Code absent a factual
finding of a specific threat to the person's life or safety. It is
not the intent of the Legislature to limit, restrict, or narrow the
application of current statutory or judicial authority to apply this
or other justifications to defendants charged with violating Section
12025 or of committing other similar offenses.
(b) Upon trial for violating Section 12025, the trier of fact
shall determine whether the defendant was acting out of a reasonable
belief that he or she was in grave danger.
Sell it to the jury, in the right circumstances, and you should be acquitted on CCW without a license.

Note how narrow this is: restraining order situations only.

CCWFacts
07-21-2008, 1:47 PM
The same reason I spent $850 and bought my first handgun.

An on going life-threatening situation where police were of little to no help. You can earn another $500 to $850, but getting another life isn't so easy.

Yeah, but this permit does no good for an ongoing situation. It's good for 90 days (at most) and it can take 6 months or more to get it, if it's issued at all. And it's temporary, so they could reasonably say, "we don't issue them for ongoing situations".

This permit will only give you coverage for a small fraction of the year, if you get it at all. If your life is really in immediate danger from a real and elevated threat, either get a resident CCW (if you can) or weigh the risks of getting busted for carrying without a CCW vs. the risks of being a victim of whatever the situation is.

Beelzy
07-21-2008, 2:13 PM
C'mon now........The State would not have a permit for statewide carry with
no catch of some kind.

The catch is: even though the permit is for state-wide use, the actual moment that the permit is required for is the restriction. An example, you need a gun for safety when handling bank deposits, ok, you get a permit.
But it doesn't mean its ok for use for defense somewhere else necessarily.
Catch 22 for the CCW permit holders.

GuyW
07-21-2008, 2:24 PM
C'mon now........The State would not have a permit for statewide carry with
no catch of some kind.

The catch is: even though the permit is for state-wide use, the actual moment that the permit is required for is the restriction. An example, you need a gun for safety when handling bank deposits, ok, you get a permit.
But it doesn't mean its ok for use for defense somewhere else necessarily.
Catch 22 for the CCW permit holders.


This is incomprehensible FUD...

Beelzy
07-21-2008, 2:40 PM
Well that would figure, I heard it from a guy at the sheriff dept. handling
the permits. :D

Glock22Fan
07-21-2008, 2:53 PM
Well that would figure, I heard it from a guy at the sheriff dept. handling
the permits. :D


Well, if you reported it as he said it, that would be true. But did he really make that little sense without you questioning it?

Permits don't have to have restrictions. Maybe, in your area, if you want a permit because you take cash to the bank, your permit might be endorsed "Only while taking cash to the bank." However, usually the permit is NOT restricted and you can indeed use it wherever and whenever you need to.

Beelzy
07-21-2008, 4:14 PM
Permits don't have to have restrictions. Maybe, in your area, if you want a permit because you take cash to the bank, your permit might be endorsed "Only while taking cash to the bank." However, usually the permit is NOT restricted and you can indeed use it wherever and whenever you need to.[/QUOTE]

They must not have liked me then. It happens. :p

Casual Observer
07-21-2008, 4:23 PM
If your need is that great, I suspect most people would go illegal and carry without a permit. (Note, I'm not recommending this, but, in some circumstances, I can understand it)

Unlicensed concealed carry is a simple misdomeanor if
A- the gun is yours (registered)
B- it is your first firearms offense
C- you do not fit the legal definition of a gang member (yes, there is one)


Also, the law provides an exception for immediate dangerous situations. i.e.- your car breaks down in the ghetto or some rural highway where you are concerned for your safety. You're allowed to lock and load (assuming you have the gun with you) and carry it while waiting for the tow truck to arrive.

Glock22Fan
07-21-2008, 5:26 PM
Unlicensed concealed carry is a simple misdomeanor if
A- the gun is yours (registered)
B- it is your first firearms offense
C- you do not fit the legal definition of a gang member (yes, there is one)


Also, the law provides an exception for immediate dangerous situations. i.e.- your car breaks down in the ghetto or some rural highway where you are concerned for your safety. You're allowed to lock and load (assuming you have the gun with you) and carry it while waiting for the tow truck to arrive.


Thank you, I presume that you have posted this for the benefit of those of us that don't know it.

Even then, it is likely to be two misdemeanors (loaded and concealed are separate) and cost you maybe $10K and a ban on owning guns for maybe ten years. As I said, if you really are threatened, I can understand you taking that risk, but it is still illegal except for your last point. And BTW on that, you are required to notify law enforcement immediately and only have your firearm loaded until they arrive.

matarlegoate
07-21-2008, 5:35 PM
My Placer county CCW had a restriction that seems to be standard for them- it said something to the effect of: Permit not valid in a place the primarily serves alcohol.

They phrased it better, but I can't remember exactly what it said. They explained to me that they didn't want people drinking in a bar with a gun and making bad (drunken) decisions later.

Kind of goes along with other states that I've been to where you can't carry a firearm if more 51% or more of their business revenues come from alcohol sales.