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View Full Version : Why are integral locks so bad?


PapaJoe
07-07-2008, 1:21 PM
I realize the ethical objection to having an integral lock on a gun, but is there a practical reason as well? I have never heard of anyone having any trouble with their weapon as a result of the lock. When I bought my 686, the dealer showed me the lock and the key, we inserted it and turned it so that the gun was unlocked, and he held up the key and said, "Now, throw this away". Of course, I didn't, but I might just as well have. The gun has never been locked since the day that I bought it.

Does anyone know of these devices causing problems?

Cordially,
PapaJoe

rivviepop
07-07-2008, 1:24 PM
Covered a few times here on this forum (do a quick search), and there's an entire thread stickied on the S&W forums. People have had issue with their locks for real, it's not just rumors.

http://smith-wessonforum.com/eve/forums/a/tpc/f/500103904/m/228102718

onikuma
07-07-2008, 1:43 PM
nods. check out the thread on the s&w forum. it's quite useful. it helped me decide to avoid the internal lock because of all the issues that they had with it.

PapaJoe
07-07-2008, 3:09 PM
Thanks for your forbearance and the link to the thread that deals extensively with integral lock failures. I had no idea that there were so many cases. Were I a better gunsmith, (Oh, hell, were I any gunsmith at all), I would employ the loctite solution to prevent the gun from ever locking again. I didn't read all the posts, but in the many that I did read there was no report of a 686 locking spontaneously, (he said, hopefully). I hope that, with the Heller decision, the political climate will have changed to the extent that S&W will cease making integral lock guns and provide a retrofit for those who want to eliminate any vestige of them at all, including the little hole that sand and water can get into.

Cordially,
PapaJoe

QuarterBoreGunner
07-07-2008, 4:25 PM
I'm of the 'fewer parts is better' school - more little tiny pieces inside the firearm, means an exponentially greater chance of something going wrong - and the chances of it happening when you absolutely, positively *need* that firearm to function fast approaches infinity.

Chris old school. Simple better. Ook ook.

hawk81
07-07-2008, 4:49 PM
More mechanical stuff to possibly break.