PDA

View Full Version : Okay to release slide without mag on handgun?


SanSacto
07-02-2008, 2:41 PM
I have a S&W Sigma 40. Is it okay to release/drop the slide without a magazine in? I do this often, is there any potential damage?

What Just Happened?
07-02-2008, 2:56 PM
I know dropping the slide on an empty chamber is a no-no on 1911's with trigger job. Something to do with it jarring the sear. For that reason, I don't do it on my CZ that has a trigger job.

yallknowho
07-02-2008, 2:59 PM
it's probably not a great idea to do it with any handgun, especially 1911s.

USN CHIEF
07-02-2008, 3:29 PM
Your S&W sigma is a cheap gun designed to take the abuse. By all means, abuse it. I have one in 9mm and I have had it for over 6 years and I have always released the slide on an empty chamber hoping that it will brake and dang thing works find every time and I have shot about 8k rounds through her already. Now just like the other people have said it, I would not do it on a high quality gun.

Slayer
07-02-2008, 3:31 PM
Smith & Wesson does not advise doing so. I called them and asked when this was asked on another forum.

Shane916
07-02-2008, 3:32 PM
Huge thread about this topic:

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=97231

Rob454
07-02-2008, 4:16 PM
Your S&W sigma is a cheap gun designed to take the abuse. By all means, abuse it. Now just like the other people have said it, I would not do it on a high quality gun.

So what youre saying is expensive guns are easier to break than cheaper guns? :D:eek: I dont drop the slide on a empty chamber ( and yes i know its cool in the movies) no matter what the cost of the gun may be.
None of my handguns cost me over 500$. They may be considered cheap by a gun collector but they work shoot straight and have never given me a problem
Rob

leitung
07-02-2008, 4:23 PM
I have my glock done like that all of the time.. no problems..

USN CHIEF
07-02-2008, 4:38 PM
So what youre saying is expensive guns are easier to break than cheaper guns? :D:eek: I dont drop the slide on a empty chamber ( and yes i know its cool in the movies) no matter what the cost of the gun may be.
None of my handguns cost me over 500$. They may be considered cheap by a gun collector but they work shoot straight and have never given me a problem
Rob

No Rob, I would just not do that to my nice guns guns because I love them soooo much:D It is like I don't like to abuse my nice F150, I always try to drive my wife's car when I need to go out and I abuse it...:eek:

bohoki
07-02-2008, 5:35 PM
could it hurt? yes

will it hurt? probably not

c good
07-02-2008, 5:49 PM
Ideally the recoil spring is designed to return the slide, while stripping another round and chambering the round into battery. Without the resistance of chambering a round it slams home at a higher speed. Theoretically it could cause some damage but I don't think it's anything to loose sleep about. Surely the engineers have built this into the design. Do I do it with my semi-autos, no. Would I worry if it happened a few times, no. HTH. c good

Satex
07-02-2008, 5:52 PM
I know dropping the slide on an empty chamber is a no-no on 1911's with trigger job. Something to do with it jarring the sear.

What would the difference be as far as the trigger mechanism is concerned between an empty and a non-empty chamber?

mblat
07-02-2008, 5:54 PM
I read the thread that was referenced above..... it was ..... educational.

Now putting aside etiquette issue. I find if hard to believe that device that was designed to withstand 147(plus/minus) grains of lead at 1100 fps and do it tens of thousands of times without a problem will have some specific problems with releasing slide on the empty chamber.
I would like an explanation from a mechanical engineer how pulling a cartridge from the magazine and chambering it reduces impact to safe levels..... Somebody want to convince me that this event slows down the slide noticeably?

Beelzy
07-02-2008, 6:03 PM
I do it once in a while, even with my 1911. No worries on my end, I did it
to a Les Baer once and the owner chastised me for possibly damaging his
precious sear. That is when I knew I didn't want a "custom" gun if it was
going to be that sensitive. ;)

virulosity
07-02-2008, 6:25 PM
Every gun I own I dry fire and drop the slide regularly, from $400 to $2500 pistols (its called dry practice). Never had any signs of premature wear or malfunctions from any.

X-NewYawker
07-02-2008, 6:42 PM
IPSC champ and S&W factory team member J Michael Plaxco used to teach to hook the hammer with your thumb as you dropped the slide on a 1911, EVEN WITH a loaded mag to keep the sear alignment in place.

oghl888
07-02-2008, 7:14 PM
It's never "good" to put uncalled-for stress on any machinery. One of my first handgun is a Taurus 99 (beretta clone). I drop the slide on that probably a few thousand times during the first 2-3 years of ownership. It's was a senseless but somehow fun thing to do for me at the time.

16 years later, it is still shooting fine with mostly original parts (only replaced springs and magazine parts so far). The aluminum frame is holding up just fine.

I've finally grown up to the point where dropping the slide on an auto, or slamming close a revolver cylinder is no longer entertaining. It only took 16 years :)

heycorey
07-02-2008, 8:11 PM
Dry-firing at home is equally important to your skill-set as live-fire on the range. And if something in your gun is going to break prematurely, better to break it dry-firing than when you might actually need it. It's a gun.

Tap. Rack. Trigger.
Tap. Rack. Trigger.
Tap. Rack. Trigger.

Guntech
07-02-2008, 9:34 PM
I usually hold the slide and ease it to resting position, but i baby my guns and fully dismantle and clean every part after shooting even 10 rounds, but thats just me

1911su16b870
07-02-2008, 9:50 PM
Dry-firing at home is equally important to your skill-set as live-fire on the range. And if something in your gun is going to break prematurely, better to break it dry-firing than when you might actually need it. It's a gun.

Tap. Rack. Trigger.
Tap. Rack. Trigger.
Tap. Rack. Trigger.

+1 treat 'em like tools which are designed to be used. Remember that surefire ad with them hammering nails with that rail mounted light. That is what I'd do if at that time and place, with no alternative, and it needed to be done!

Matt P
07-02-2008, 9:58 PM
As Shane said...

Huge thread about this topic:

http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/s...ad.php?t=97231

I removed my post as this has been more then discussed.

SuperSet
07-02-2008, 10:07 PM
Smith & Wesson does not advise doing so. I called them and asked when this was asked on another forum.

Wow, not exactly confidence inspiring. :rolleyes:

Rob454
07-03-2008, 5:03 PM
I always try to drive my wife's car when I need to go out and I abuse it...:eek:

LOl nothing like overloading a family sedan with 500 pounds of concrete bags. They handle well with all that weight in the back especially a front wheel drive:D