PDA

View Full Version : USGI 1911 A1 Lanyard (How to)


Gator Monroe
06-27-2008, 9:11 AM
Any one have a tutorial pic or handbook guide instructions on proper use and function of the military pistol Lanyard ?

gn3hz3ku1*
06-27-2008, 9:23 AM
run out of bullets? swing the gun at someone :)

Gator Monroe
06-27-2008, 9:25 AM
run out of bullets? swing the gun at someone :)

Thats from the Russian Tokarev guidebook ?:chris:

Brooke
06-27-2008, 9:48 AM
Isn't it to make your handgun into a key fob?

Gator Monroe
06-27-2008, 10:23 AM
or turn a 1911 INTO A WHISTLE ?:sleeping:

bohoki
06-27-2008, 12:46 PM
all i know is the lanyard loop magazines are kinda expensive

and they hurt my hand when i do a magnum P.I. reload

rorschach
06-27-2008, 2:31 PM
all i know is the lanyard loop magazines are kinda expensive

and they hurt my hand when i do a magnum P.I. reload

Lanyard loop mainspring housing FTW!
http://www.guncrafterindustries.com/graphics/images/lanyard_1_600.jpg

rayra
06-27-2008, 2:53 PM
indeed.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v95/rayra/militaria/my45-1.jpg


As to the 'proper use' question, I've never seen any explicit directions on where it should be attached even when I was in the Marines. Just don't put it around your neck.

Res
06-27-2008, 5:20 PM
As to the 'proper use' question, I've never seen any explicit directions on where it should be attached even when I was in the Marines. Just don't put it around your neck.

And why not? It worked just fine for Tuco :p

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v652/ResDogDM/Forum%20Images/bathtub.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v652/ResDogDM/Forum%20Images/tuco1.jpg

QuarterBoreGunner
06-27-2008, 10:45 PM
Thank you! We need more love for Tuco Benedicto Pacifico Juan Maria Ramiez (also know as The Rat).

ajl2121
06-28-2008, 11:44 AM
It can also be used to put around your wrist first before you grip the pistol. That way, it won't fall off, and you can "hang" it off your wrist if you have to open a door and your off hand is holding something.

JTROKS
06-28-2008, 12:18 PM
My Sig GSR Revolution TTT came with a MSH that has that lanyard attachment feature. I suppose is will help in keeping the pistol when I'm killing zombies. Switching back and forth with the pistol and machette you know.

crowbar
06-28-2008, 2:40 PM
I used to hook it on the epaulet of my field jacket or on the suspenders of my web gear. Still have the lanyard, wish I had the issue 1911....

rayra
06-28-2008, 3:58 PM
yeah but Tuco didn't have a holster / pistol belt - which is where you should be attaching your lanyard. That way when you take off your gunbelt (or whatever your holster is attached to) it all comes off together.
I kept mine looped around my web belt of my deuce gear, and around my belt when dirt-biking in the high desert.

ricknadine1111
06-28-2008, 10:12 PM
And why not? It worked just fine for Tuco :p

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v652/ResDogDM/Forum%20Images/bathtub.jpg

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v652/ResDogDM/Forum%20Images/tuco1.jpg

"GREAT PICTURES"

Salty
06-29-2008, 5:06 AM
I believe Canadian Mounties use it to tether their pistol around their neck.

http://images.jupiterimages.com/common/detail/04/91/22569104.jpg

11Z50
06-29-2008, 5:34 AM
Most units that issue pistols have an SOP on lanyards. REMFs and MP's usually run the lanyard under their firing-side epaulets.

In infantry units, lanyards are often of little use. They do come in handy in certain scenarios, such as tunnel clearing and urban ops. When issued a pistol in the field, I'd attach the lanyard and place it around my neck while in my sleeping bag.

I noticed several plastic coil lanyards (like a telephone handset coiled cord) in Iraq. These were attached to the holster, so when one needed to draw the piece, the coil would stretch, but then shrink when the pistol was re-holstered. Kinda cheesy, IMHO.

The whole issue is somewhat moot, since in any serious combat environment pistols are of little use. They are issued to officers as a badge of authority, or to crew-served weapon troops who would use a pistol as a last-ditch measure.

QuarterBoreGunner
06-29-2008, 9:29 AM
I'd always heard that "if the enemy is close enough for you to use a pistol, you've lost that battle."

Then I was talking a retired Viet-Nam vet and he said not true, that there were situations where they used 1911s up close and personal. He said that the VC had a phrase about dealing with GIs up close - they said "get up close and grab his belt" meaning that they greatly feared American artillery and bombs and so knew that in battle it was better to get as close to the enemy as possible to fight, because they wouldn't call in either on their own men.

ricknadine1111
06-29-2008, 12:46 PM
"If so", who was that solder in WW-1 that took all those German's prisoner with just the pistol? "SGT Alvin C York" in case you forgot, never give up if the fight gets down to a pistol use it, He did.

dichter
06-29-2008, 1:16 PM
and they hurt my hand when i do a magnum P.I. reload

LOL. Ah yes, I know exactly what you are talking about :D

JTROKS
06-29-2008, 1:17 PM
The whole issue is somewhat moot, since in any serious combat environment pistols are of little use. They are issued to officers as a badge of authority, or to crew-served weapon troops who would use a pistol as a last-ditch measure.

Check the dude with a M9. I sure wouldn't appreciate it if I was the Marine firing the M16 over the sandbags.

http://www.liveleak.com/view?i=a11_1214737449

smle-man
06-29-2008, 5:33 PM
The lanyard serves only one purpose and that is to stop your handgun from falling out of the holster and getting lost. One might think that is pretty unlikely but when you are running at full speed and diving and rolling it is amazing what can come unattached from your equipment. I always looped the lanyard around the pistol belt near the holster or attached it to the suspenders for the ALICE gear. The main problem with a lanyard is that it gets snagged on stuff. Army regs say that you will always use a lanyard with a handgun although the reg is frequently ignored in Iraq. The old MP style lanyard is gone now, the coiled plastic telephone cord style is now in use. Having been with a friend who lost a handgun from his holster when we were running through a field of grass towards a rabbit we had just shot - the handgun was never found - made me a believe in a lanyard when in the field.

L-2
06-29-2008, 5:48 PM
I've seen the advertisements and the lanyard loops & holes on guns, but have never yet seen one used, in person, on anybody's gun.

Under $40: http://www.blackhawk.com/product1.asp?P=90TPL&C=C1398
http://www.blackhawk.com/images/catalog/90TPL_0.JPG

11Z50
06-29-2008, 10:35 PM
Yes, that's the set-up I saw in Iraq.

Even though I stated earlier that pistols have little use in combat, I always drew one when either I was authorized or could talk the supply sergeant into issuing me one.

I don't know that there is an actual regulation requiring use of a lanyard, but most units I was in did issue a lanyard with the pistol. I did a lot of work with armor (tank) units, and they issued quite a few pistols to the tank crews. They used issued shoulder rigs and always attached a lanyard to the holster. When I was in a TOW company, each gunner got a .45, which was carried in a hip holster on his LBE. The lanyard was attached to the LBE and the pistol. Although none of my troops ever lost a pistol, I don't know that the lanyard was the reason why. It was a matter of our SOP that lanyards would be issued, but I never busted anybody's balls if I didn't see them in use.

The way an issue lanyard is set up is there is a metal eye-clip on one end, and the lanyard itself is an adjustable loop. You stick one end of the loop into what you want to attach it to, then run the clip thru the loop. Pull it tight and attach the clip to the lanyard loop on the pistol. Like most things military, the issued lanyard is over-engineered and more complicated than it needs to be.

I have seen "dummy cords" used on weapons and other sensitive items on night patrols in jungle or wooded environments. One simply attaches a length of parachute cord, a bootlace or whatever to his weapon and himself to preclude loss while negotiating difficult terrain. This idea sounds a little off, but has been a valuable procedure for many years.

A side note; back in the day, before SINGCARS (self-scrambling radio units) the RTO was issued a lanyard to attach the SOI (Signal Operating Instructions, a code book) to his body. Frankly, I'd have rather lost a pistol than a for-real SOI.

goathead
06-30-2008, 6:01 AM
Yes, that's the set-up I saw in Iraq.

Even though I stated earlier that pistols have little use in combat, I always drew one when either I was authorized or could talk the supply sergeant into issuing me one.

I don't know that there is an actual regulation requiring use of a lanyard, but most units I was in did issue a lanyard with the pistol. I did a lot of work with armor (tank) units, and they issued quite a few pistols to the tank crews. They used issued shoulder rigs and always attached a lanyard to the holster. When I was in a TOW company, each gunner got a .45, which was carried in a hip holster on his LBE. The lanyard was attached to the LBE and the pistol. Although none of my troops ever lost a pistol, I don't know that the lanyard was the reason why. It was a matter of our SOP that lanyards would be issued, but I never busted anybody's balls if I didn't see them in use.

The way an issue lanyard is set up is there is a metal eye-clip on one end, and the lanyard itself is an adjustable loop. You stick one end of the loop into what you want to attach it to, then run the clip thru the loop. Pull it tight and attach the clip to the lanyard loop on the pistol. Like most things military, the issued lanyard is over-engineered and more complicated than it needs to be.

I have seen "dummy cords" used on weapons and other sensitive items on night patrols in jungle or wooded environments. One simply attaches a length of parachute cord, a bootlace or whatever to his weapon and himself to preclude loss while negotiating difficult terrain. This idea sounds a little off, but has been a valuable procedure for many years.

A side note; back in the day, before SINGCARS (self-scrambling radio units) the RTO was issued a lanyard to attach the SOI (Signal Operating Instructions, a code book) to his body. Frankly, I'd have rather lost a pistol than a for-real SOI.

i used mine M9 in a firefight in Iraq with a lanyard, i would have lost my m9 if i didn't have a lanyard on it.

JTROKS
06-30-2008, 8:05 AM
I'm sure Uncle Sam have heard it over and over again of lost equipment in the field and training exercises. If it's in the regs or instructions then someone not abiding by it can get a reprimand. Most of the time handguns are issued to officers and senior NCOs, unless the job or assignment dictates otherwise.

11Z50
06-30-2008, 9:19 AM
I'm sure Uncle Sam have heard it over and over again of lost equipment in the field and training exercises. If it's in the regs or instructions then someone not abiding by it can get a reprimand. Most of the time handguns are issued to officers and senior NCOs, unless the job or assignment dictates otherwise.

If a troop lost a pistol, but had a good excuse and half a lanyard still attached to him in some manner, he'd probably not get in trouble. Lost or damaged gear is accounted for by a process called a Report of Survey. If the circumstances are such that the troop was not negligent, ie "combat loss", he/she pays nothing. If, on the other hand, the loss was thru failure to follow SOP or regs, or negligence, the soldier will pay for part or all of the Gov't cost of that piece of gear.

I once had a soldier bring me a CVC (Combat Vehicle Crewman's) helmet that had been run over by his vehicle. Since one is supposed to be wearing his CVC at all times when in the vehicle, I asked him why his head had not been squished as well. He bought the helmet via a report of survey.

smle-man
06-30-2008, 7:28 PM
Yes, that's the set-up I saw in Iraq.

Even though I stated earlier that pistols have little use in combat, I always drew one when either I was authorized or could talk the supply sergeant into issuing me one.

I don't know that there is an actual regulation requiring use of a lanyard, but most units I was in did issue a lanyard with the pistol. I did a lot of work with armor (tank) units, and they issued quite a few pistols to the tank crews. They used issued shoulder rigs and always attached a lanyard to the holster. When I was in a TOW company, each gunner got a .45, which was carried in a hip holster on his LBE. The lanyard was attached to the LBE and the pistol. Although none of my troops ever lost a pistol, I don't know that the lanyard was the reason why. It was a matter of our SOP that lanyards would be issued, but I never busted anybody's balls if I didn't see them in use.

The way an issue lanyard is set up is there is a metal eye-clip on one end, and the lanyard itself is an adjustable loop. You stick one end of the loop into what you want to attach it to, then run the clip thru the loop. Pull it tight and attach the clip to the lanyard loop on the pistol. Like most things military, the issued lanyard is over-engineered and more complicated than it needs to be.

I have seen "dummy cords" used on weapons and other sensitive items on night patrols in jungle or wooded environments. One simply attaches a length of parachute cord, a bootlace or whatever to his weapon and himself to preclude loss while negotiating difficult terrain. This idea sounds a little off, but has been a valuable procedure for many years.

A side note; back in the day, before SINGCARS (self-scrambling radio units) the RTO was issued a lanyard to attach the SOI (Signal Operating Instructions, a code book) to his body. Frankly, I'd have rather lost a pistol than a for-real SOI.


The reg exists. In the old days (pre M9) aviators were issued .38 revolvers, many of which did not have lanyard loops. The lanyard was looped through the trigger guard and the clip end attached to the aviator's vest.

bear
07-01-2008, 4:30 PM
If you recall the history of the 1911 it was intended originally for CAVALRY.
Here a lanyard would be a very good idea indeed.
Look at pages 67 to 71 of this field manual, I can't distinctly make out the lanyard, but it appears to be over the shoulder, perhaps held in an epaulet.
There's no practical way it could be attached to the holster when firing from a horse. I checked almost every page, I couldn't find any mention of a lanyard, but I can easily imagine how essential it would be to mounted troops.
http://www.sightm1911.com/manual/manual.htm

rayra
07-01-2008, 6:38 PM
The whole issue is somewhat moot, since in any serious combat environment pistols are of little use. They are issued to officers as a badge of authority, or to crew-served weapon troops who would use a pistol as a last-ditch measure.


Maybe in the Army. Marine Corps still employs them effectively. ;)


http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/2583/1174085732837nx6.jpg

JTROKS
07-01-2008, 9:22 PM
Yup! I was appointed as the investigating official on a few report of surveys. CWDE training gear, body armor and M16 and M9 magazines. A body armor with plates aren't cheap. I had an Airman telling me he couldn't afford to pay for it, I told him not to worry about it, since finance will figure out a way to squeeze his paycheck. When I was issued an M9 during an exercise we were not required to use a lanyard, if it was we would've been issued one too.

11Z50
07-01-2008, 10:32 PM
Maybe in the Army. Marine Corps still employs them effectively. ;)


http://img294.imageshack.us/img294/2583/1174085732837nx6.jpg

The guy bleeding is a First Sergeant in the 5th Marines, usually a job that doesn't get you in the direct fight. According to the story I saw on TV, the 1SG and another Marine were pinned down in a building in Fallujah. He was protecting a wounded Marine and was awarded the Navy Cross.

slick_711
07-02-2008, 9:30 AM
The only important use of the lanyard loop on a 1911 is that it allows you to use your pistol as a bottle opener.

Gator Monroe
07-04-2008, 8:59 PM
i used mine M9 in a firefight in Iraq with a lanyard, i would have lost my m9 if i didn't have a lanyard on it.

Nuff said (I'm using mine ) thanx much.............................................. ......