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View Full Version : Exceptionally Tight Bolt in a Remington 700 SPS Varmint .308


FlyingPen
06-01-2008, 11:34 PM
I have an exceptionally tight bolt in my new rifle and I was thinking of using some lapping compound like this: http://www.midwayusa.com/eproductpage.exe/showproduct?saleitemid=498161&t=11082005

On the wear areas on the bolt and locking/unlocking it repeatedly until the action smooths out. I was wondering if there's anything I should be watchful for? I was going to spray everything down with break cleaner after.

I don't have to worry about anything funky like headspacing or anything do I?

The bolt is tight in pulling it back up from it's locked down state. It's pretty ridiculous, I was getting callouses after shooting 80 rounds and slamming the scope frequently.

It's too tight to do the open palm method.

FMJBT
06-02-2008, 12:43 AM
I would stay away from lapping compound for this. If some works its way into the locking lug area, then you probably will run into headspace issues. I'd suggest first coloring the bolt body with either layout dye or a water based marker like crayola. Insert the bolt into the rifle and cycle once, then remove. Areas where the marker has rubbed off are what you will be looking for. The Remingtons are built with enough clearance between the bolt and receiver that it should not be binding up due to a tight fit. Likely there is something protruding out of either the bolt or receiver that is causing the binding. Another possibility is that part of the cocking mechanism is binding up inside the bolt body. Remingtons cock on the opening of the bolt, like most other modern bolt action rifles. If the bolt operates smoothly while closing, but binds on opening only, it's probably something internal in the cocking mechanism.

Also, does the rifle do the same thing on an empty chamber?

FlyingPen
06-02-2008, 12:57 AM
Yup same on an empty chamber.

The only area of resistance is when I'm pulling the handle up or down once I'm fully forward.

Would i be better off sending the rifle to Remington?

I don't want them to just send it back to me without doing anything and saying it was normal.

postal
06-02-2008, 5:27 PM
I found tutorials online about savage bolt polishing- I'm sure you should be able to find the same for rem.

I went nuts on my savage with a dremel and polishing compound, and polishing compound just working the bolt...and it worked great.

Keep it away from the lugs is all you really need to be carefull about... but a little research should explain where and why you need to polish specific areas.

Sounds like you may have a similar problem as I- It's a timing issue, or just a rough cocking ramp. Timing is, spreading the camming/cocking effort over the widest range of bolt lift to lower the weight, versus having the the cocking effort focused into a small degree of bolt throw. Also the cocking ramp may be rough which will increase resistance all by itself. These are the main concerns for heavy bolt lift. Proper polishing will help a great deal.

FlyingPen
06-02-2008, 9:49 PM
Some links to the tutorial would be awesome. I'm not sure where on the locking lugs i shouldn't put polish.

FMJBT
06-02-2008, 10:43 PM
Definitely stay off of the rear surface of the lugs. The rear edge is what bears against the receiver and controls the depth of headspace. The front edge of the lugs shouldn't show any signs of wear at all, if the forward edge is scratched up, it could be causing the binding.

ar15barrels
06-02-2008, 10:49 PM
Definitely stay off of the rear surface of the lugs. The rear edge is what bears against the receiver and controls the depth of headspace. The front edge of the lugs shouldn't show any signs of wear at all, if the forward edge is scratched up, it could be causing the binding.

His forward edge does show some marks.

Apply lapping compound to the front of the bolt lugs sparingly.
Work the bolt open and closed a couple dozen times while applying forward pressure to the bolt handle.
Flush out all the lapping compound and clean the barrel/bolt/lugs really good when you are done to remove all the lapping compound.
Don't forget to re-oil after using brake cleaner because it strips ALL the protective oil off the gun and the gun will rust easily without some oil on it.

Pthfndr
06-02-2008, 10:55 PM
Did you notice if it did it before you installed the scope bases? Had a scope base screw one time that was too long and contacting the lug when the bolt was rotated.

May not be your problem, but it's easy enough to check before you start lapping anything.

ar15barrels
06-02-2008, 10:59 PM
Did you notice if it did it before you installed the scope bases?
Had a scope base screw one time that was too long and contacting the lug when the bolt was rotated.

Light bulb goes on.
There WAS a slight scratch on the side of one of the lugs that was bothering me...

Good call Rob.

FlyingPen
06-02-2008, 11:03 PM
Definitely will check that first before I start using chemicals.

If it is one of base screws, how do I get a shorter one? Keep in mind, I have the bare minimum of tools except for a bunch of car tools.

It is an EGW 20moa base.

ar15barrels
06-02-2008, 11:04 PM
If it is one of base screws, how do I get a shorter one?

File or grind the screw shorter.

postal
06-02-2008, 11:25 PM
---edit---

Oh yeah, forgot that one- action screws and scope base screws can be too long and bind an action. Even with limited tools, a file, or even sandpaper can shorten the screws. (file is faster/easier) So many posts after I read the request for the polishing tutorial.... spent quite awhile finding it while the rest of the posts showed up, so I'm gonna post it ANYWAY!:detective:---end edit---


The "lugs" are the front part of the bolt face- the "wings" that engage a recess in the action that get cammed into place when you close the bolt downward and mechanically lock the bolt forward. Very minor polishing of the lugs is actually a good thing to ensure the entire surface of the lug is in contact with the lug recess instead of a small highspot, but excessive polishing of the lugs will change the position of the bolt when closed which will change headspace- possibly to a dangerous level. Serious caution is needed when polishing the lugs themselves, but everything else is fair game.

Due to the differences between the savage and rem bolts, I doubt it will help you, but here is the info for the savage.

This shows a disassembled bolt-
http://www.switchbarrel.com/BOLTHEAD.htm

Polishing the savage bolt
http://www.steyrscout.org/savscout.htm

FlyingPen
06-02-2008, 11:29 PM
Guys.

The case of the exceptionally tight bolt is solved.

It was in fact one of the screws from the EGW base. The middle screw was too long, now it's as smooth as butter. I'll be picking up a set of metal files tomorrow to grind down that screw. Damn you EGW!!

Thanks guys, hopefully I didn't damage my bolt too badly with the screw dragging on it.

Thanks for all your effort postal!

postal
06-02-2008, 11:45 PM
No Problem-

Glad you got it solved! An easy fix too. Once you're sure you have the bolt lengths right, use blue loctite on the base screws to be sure the mount doesnt move.

Spdjunkie
06-03-2008, 12:10 AM
IMHO/.02: Always backtrack to stock/config. before the problem(s) started. Most times its something you add to the mix that @&#^@* things up.

Glad you found what it was. I would have posted the base screw length as well.

Good call.

Have a great one,
F.T.K.

jandmtv
06-03-2008, 12:13 AM
Thats weird, I have a EGW base on my remmy and the screws sit nice and flush with the inside of the receiver. Glad you found the problem though.

Prc329
06-03-2008, 7:23 AM
Maybe you put the rear screw in the front hole. If I remember correctly there should be two short screws and two long screws. The longer ones go in the back.

chsk9
06-03-2008, 7:50 AM
+1 on the action screws- try backing them off a bit and I think you'll find your problem is resolved.

fairfaxjim
06-03-2008, 10:57 AM
Maybe you put the rear screw in the front hole. If I remember correctly there should be two short screws and two long screws. The longer ones go in the back.

That's what I was thinking. I have also had screws that come with mounts just be plain too long. It is a good policy when action problems happen to just remove all the attachments and start from there, if it sill happens, remove the stock too. It is amazing how a bit of a tweak or the wrong screw in a goofy place can have bad results.

FlyingPen
06-03-2008, 11:05 AM
I'll check tonight guys. I thought I used the longest screw for the rear but I'll double check.