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WINGEDSWORD
05-31-2008, 4:03 PM
How many of you are into black powder rifles? While I own and enjoy "Black Rifles" and other military class rifles, I seem to have most fun with my "front stuffer" I currently own an M1842 Rifled Musket replica .69 caliber. That .69
caliber Minie ball really puts a hole in the target! With proper loads and concentration on my part, I can get 5 shot groups with all holes overlapping.

Mikeb
05-31-2008, 4:45 PM
I love front stuffers... though if I go to Davis street I am careful to get close to the hose....I've set the range on fire a few times. THe golden age was the high point of firearms development, I believe. There have been more effective designs, but there are none prettier. I am still left wondering how the state of CA views BP weapons. On the federal level they are non firearms... I still keep wondering if they are zipguns in CA.
take care
Mikeb

Python2
05-31-2008, 4:46 PM
Too bad no more black powder shoot (rendezvous) around the Bay area anymore. That would have been fun with buck skin attire and the works. I have a collection of black powder rifle and pistols (flint and percussion), most of them I built out of kits. Frankly, their kick are no worse than shooting a magnum 30Cal on up rifle cartridges.

Here is a 69Cal Brown Bess
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r251/Python2_photos/MVC-003S.jpg
Here is some of my front stuffer
http://i146.photobucket.com/albums/r251/Python2_photos/MVC-021S.jpg

RANGER295
05-31-2008, 4:46 PM
I have several caplock rifles. They are all either .50 or .45. I love the challenge of hitting a target with the old school fixed sites. Then the audible delay between the cap going off, the charge going off, then the longer delay between the charge going off and the sound of the ball smacking the target 100 to 200 yards away.

Army
05-31-2008, 6:11 PM
Then the audible delay between the cap going off, the charge going off, then the longer delay between the charge going off and the sound of the ball smacking the target 100 to 200 yards away.
You need to better compress your charge . Percussion rifles should fire immediately when loaded correctly. Flinters will have a very slight delay due to the priming charge needing to burn first.

Python, if you don't mind the drive, Smith River has a week long Rendezvous at the end of June.

Mikeb
05-31-2008, 6:44 PM
Smith River has a week long Rendezvous at the end of June.

I love the Smith ... do you have any details
yhanks
Mike

ptoguy2002
05-31-2008, 8:38 PM
I just ordered an Armi 1861 Springfield from Cabelas last week.
I was going to get the pedersoli, but figured that since this was my first black powder rifle, i'd get the cheaper on first.
I like shooting steel and paper and bowling pins and all, but figure i'd try the black powder route, and little more interactive.
Maybe it'll catch on, and I'll be the next nut at the range wearing a civil war keppie.

bigthaiboy
06-01-2008, 12:15 AM
I've been seriously thinking about getting my first muzzle loader, something like a .50 Cal CVA Wolf with 209 ignition, as I think it'll make a good choice for wild pig hunting.

Python2
06-01-2008, 7:18 AM
I dont know but this in-line blackpowder rifle to me defeat the essence of a true historical blackpowder rifle both for fun shooting including hunting. If going hunting with an in-line, why bother? just go with your smokeless.

ptoguy2002
06-01-2008, 8:31 AM
Question for those muzzle loaders out there:
I've always thought that the word "musket" refered to a muzzleloader that was smoothbore, and if it had a rifled barrel, it was a "rifle" not a "musket?"

School a newb on proper terminology here.

Thanks

Python2
06-01-2008, 10:12 AM
Question for those muzzle loaders out there:
I've always thought that the word "musket" refered to a muzzleloader that was smoothbore, and if it had a rifled barrel, it was a "rifle" not a "musket?"

School a newb on proper terminology here.

Thanks

That is what I thought, but I could be wrong:rolleyes:

Fjold
06-01-2008, 4:07 PM
musket




Main Entry: mus·ket
Pronunciation: \ˈməs-kət\
Function: noun
Etymology: Middle French mousquet, from Old Italian moschetto small artillery piece, sparrow hawk, from diminutive of mosca fly, from Latin musca — more at midge
Date: circa 1587
: a heavy large-caliber muzzle-loading usually smoothbore shoulder firearm; broadly : a shoulder gun carried by infantry



I have a left handed Thompson-Center renegade 54 cal rifle that I built from a kit.

30Cal
06-01-2008, 5:56 PM
Here's mine. .50 caliber flintlock. Douglas barrel with a roundball twist.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2163/2542745737_9f1a80c861_b.jpg

WINGEDSWORD
06-01-2008, 6:04 PM
I agree, the terminology can be confusing, but it goes back to the Ordnance
department of the 1850 period. Up until the 1850's all regular U.S. Infantry Regiments carried .69 caliber muskets. Smoothbores. Only the specialized rifle
regiments carried rifles. The Rifles were shorter, lighter and smaller caliber
(.54) and were not equipped with bayonets as they were to be used as skirmishers, not in the main line of battle. IN 1855 The Army switched over to
rifles for all regiments. And the standard caliber was .58. Not wanting to waste servicible weapons in stock, a number of 1842 Muskets were rifled and issued to state units.The regular army then re-rifled the M1841 rifles to .58
and equipped them with bayonets. The M1855 Rifle and rifled musket were both .58 but the longer weapon was called a rifled musket and ths shorter a rifle. This terminology existed until the M1873 rifle was issued and the older terminology dropped.

30Cal
06-01-2008, 6:10 PM
Flinters will have a very slight delay due to the priming charge needing to burn first.

Ideally, yes. Sometimes it's slower. Sometimes there's no bang at all. It can take a lot of tinkering to get it to fire consistently. Good flints and a hard frizen are a must, and even then, it's not a sure thing.

Python2
06-01-2008, 8:10 PM
Here's mine. .50 caliber flintlock. Douglas barrel with a roundball twist.

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2163/2542745737_9f1a80c861_b.jpg

Nice:)

bigthaiboy
06-02-2008, 11:29 PM
I dont know but this in-line blackpowder rifle to me defeat the essence of a true historical blackpowder rifle both for fun shooting including hunting. If going hunting with an in-line, why bother? just go with your smokeless.


I understand your viewpoint. There's the blackpowder smoothbore rifles of historical interest and there are modern, practical and accurate muzzle loaders with a large variety of bullet and sabot options. The two appeal to different people and serve different functions. Where else am I going to find a new rifle which can fire a .50 cal 300gr bullet for under $200? (other than a shotgun with rifled slugs). A formidable hunting tool at a great price.

CSACANNONEER
06-03-2008, 6:58 AM
I took my first buck with my first smokepole before I even got to brown it. Charcoal burners rule!

Mac Attack
06-03-2008, 8:07 PM
I enjoy shooting my BP rifle more than I enjoy shooting my centerfire rifles. I started shooting my 50 Cal Thompson Center Hawken rifle towards the end of 2007 and have shot the hell out of it. When I was living in GA I didn't have to drive more than a few miles to shoot my rifle so it is fair to say that I shot it nearly every day.

BP is big in the South and it's not uncommon to see a handful at the range shooting them. Everytime I got to the range I see people watching me load and shoot my rifle. They always comment about how long it takes to load and they ask if I enjoy shooting my rifle. I tell them to take a shot and let me know what they think. Their comments are always the same "I thought it would kick more" or "its more accurate than I thought it would be."
I consider a 2-3 hour range visit with an average of 20-30 shots each visit to be quite theraputic.

I like everything about shooting BP and had planned to use my Hawken for this years deer hunting season over my .270. At the end of hunting season I picked up 1k .490 dia Speer balls on clearance from Walmart for a 3rd of what they normall cost. Here is a picture of me and my rifle and a couple of vids.
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/DSC06793.jpg
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/MarkwithHawken1.jpg
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/LoadandMakeready.jpg

Here's me shooting at a water container at about 50 yards and then again at 100+ yards --- both are hits :D
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/th_Markat40yards.jpg (http://s6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/?action=view&current=Markat40yards.flv)
http://i6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/th_Mark100yards.jpg (http://s6.photobucket.com/albums/y208/mmacayan/TC%20Hawken%20Rifle/?action=view&current=Mark100yards.flv)

smle-man
06-03-2008, 9:59 PM
How about black powder cartridge arms? I shoot a Martini Henry 577/450 Mk4 British infantry rifle from the 1880s. Lots of smoke and thunder. I used to shoot a Parker Hale .577 Enfield muzzle loader back some 30 years ago but sold it when I went on active duty. I've throught about getting back into shooting a ML again.