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View Full Version : Staking or Loctite?


badshot
05-25-2008, 10:01 AM
I'm moving towards using blue loctite on my castlenut but would like some input into the advantages/disadvantages of staking vs loctite.

jandmtv
05-25-2008, 10:35 AM
You could use locktite, but the proper way is to stake it. As far as advantages/disadvantages go, im not sure if there are any.

bwiese
05-25-2008, 10:36 AM
Staking is always preferable.

If you have a spare 'thinner' castlenut, though, and had enough extra thread exposed you could use the 'double-nut' method.

ByteMe72
05-25-2008, 10:40 AM
Blue Loctite
Pro: Will hold it firm (this is what I used and I write from experience). Is "undoable" if you need to take it apart.
Con: None really. It's slightly messy, but completely invisible if you apply it right.

Staking
Pro: Should also hold it firm. A little more permanent than loctite.
Con: Dings up your parts (more visible, in other words). Can be more difficult to undo. Restaking after taking it apart will ding up your gun even more.

Although there are those that will advocate for staking, most AR guys seem to go the loctite route. I did, and have had no reason to regret it. I have had to take apart my stock just once since I built it up, and it was some work to get the castle nut off. However, it did come off and once I reassembled it, everything looked EXACTLY the same as it did before. The amount of work it took to get it off makes me very sure that it won't ever work loose on it's own. At least, not without LOTS of help.

NiteQwill
05-25-2008, 11:16 AM
I use loctite simply because I may need to take it apart again.

jandmtv
05-25-2008, 11:33 AM
What makes you guys think staking is so permanent? I bet it would be harder to take off a locktited castle nut than a staked one.

1911su16b870
05-25-2008, 11:40 AM
IMO with the proper castle nut wrench, either blue locktite or staked is equally easy to remove.

ironcross
05-25-2008, 12:25 PM
IMO I would say Blue Loctite

badshot
05-25-2008, 12:49 PM
IMO I would say Blue Loctite

I thank everyone for their input. I'm going to go with the Blue Loctite for starters. If I have problems I can always stake it later.

ironcross
05-25-2008, 12:53 PM
Depends on how its staked

I would say it would be hard to remove something staked like this
http://www.m-guns.com/galimg/adt.jpg

Like this i would asume its easer
http://img398.imageshack.us/img398/6765/boltstakecrosssj6.jpg

J_Rock
05-25-2008, 1:07 PM
Depends on how its staked

I would say it would be hard to remove something staked like this
http://www.m-guns.com/galimg/adt.jpg

Like this i would asume its easer
http://img398.imageshack.us/img398/6765/boltstakecrosssj6.jpg

Thats a carrier key, not a castle nut...

Totally different beasts

ironcross
05-25-2008, 1:34 PM
Thats a carrier key, not a castle nut...

Totally different beasts

I know that, was just using them as reference to staking. (only pictures I could find that had to do with ARs and Staking) To get a point of view of staking

jandmtv
05-25-2008, 1:52 PM
A staked castle nut is very easy to remove with a car stock wrench, while a loctited castle nut is going to have resistance the whole way out. Do it the right way, and stake it.

NiteQwill
05-25-2008, 1:56 PM
Here are some staking pictures:
http://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=6994

Some look nearly impossible to loosen once staked. I'll stick with blue loctite.

jandmtv
05-25-2008, 2:03 PM
Here are some staking pictures:
http://www.m4carbine.net/showthread.php?t=6994

Some look nearly impossible to loosen once staked. I'll stick with blue loctite.

lol, you are wrong, trust me.

J_Rock
05-25-2008, 2:17 PM
lol, you are wrong, trust me.

Actually I have had a castle nut shoot loose on me at the range. Mind you this was after I had staked it myself with a screwdriver and got a little metal into the grove. After that I bit the bullet and got a proper staking tool.

jandmtv
05-25-2008, 2:19 PM
i stake mine with a good quality punch, no problems thus far.

bohoki
05-25-2008, 2:42 PM
locktite should only be used where heat wont be a factor


or do like zee germans do and use a locking screw to lock that screw but then i guess you would need a lock screw for the lock screw

like on my chinese pellet gun

http://i43.photobucket.com/albums/e366/bohoki/DCP_6151.jpg

sorry didnt feel like digging the mauser out of the safe

Addax
05-25-2008, 3:13 PM
Both.

Use a little loctite and stake it.

NRAhighpowershooter
05-25-2008, 3:17 PM
Both.

Use a little loctite and stake it.

I use both as well.. lock-tite red and staking....

NiteQwill
05-25-2008, 5:31 PM
lol, you are wrong, trust me.

get off your high horse :) trust me

ar15barrels
05-25-2008, 10:46 PM
Staking is the right way to do it.

http://ar15barrels.com/tech/castle-nut-stake.jpg

Anything else is a compromise.

motorhead
05-26-2008, 6:16 AM
blue loctite is removable. red is more permanant and usually requires heat to break loose. the important thing to note about all loctite products is that none is good above 300 deg.

-hanko
05-26-2008, 9:29 AM
Staking is always preferable.

If you have a spare 'thinner' castlenut, though, and had enough extra thread exposed you could use the 'double-nut' method.
Staking is the way to go. I've used 2 castle nuts, both staked...it's an elegant solution. A single nut, correctly staked, will not shoot loose (operative word here is "correctly")...grind a punch or chisel and use it as a dedicated staking tool. Staked nuts are easy to remove, as you only have to use a wrench to clear the stake marks.

Blue Loctite is a poor 2nd choice...degrease the nut and tube, use the recommended Loctite primer on both parts, and tighten the hell out of it. Let it sit for a day before shooting. It will be a biatch to remove, you'll need a wrench and a good vise, and a propane torch or heat gun.

the important thing to note about all loctite products is that none is good above 300 deg.

If my buffer tube got to 300 degrees, I might have other issues:rolleyes:. More important to note that Loctite can make a mess of aluminum threads...it's ok if you must on a free float tube, but staking is better on a stock nut.

-hanko